Items tagged with Teardown

At long last, the Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 is here and available to order, provided you have $880 to spend on a smartphone (subsidized pricing and monthly installment plans are available too). One thing you might want to consider if picking up Samsung's latest phablet is warranty coverage, as based on the results of a recent teardown, you should probably avoid trying any DIY repairs. The nimble fingered folks at iFixIt snagged a Galaxy Note 7 and promptly gutted the device until all that remained were the individual parts, disassembled and naked for all the world to see. The process was met with several challenges along the way starting with the adhesive that holds the rear glass in place. Patience... Read more...
The technology teardown specialists at iFixIt wasted no times getting their eager mitts on Microsoft's brand spanking new Xbox One S console, a slimmed down version of the original with a few notable upgrades, including a GPU that's clocked around 7 percent higher. So what's it like playing a real life game of Operation on the Xbox One S? It's similar to tearing into a Day One Edition Xbox One released three years ago, though not entirely the same. Things have been rejiggered in downsizing the Xbox One's physical dimensions. However, before getting inside, you'll need to remove/destroy the tampering sticker that lets Microsoft know you've been mucking around with the console's internal bits.... Read more...
A new teardown and piece by piece analysis of the bits involved in making the Oculus Rift VR headset reveals a "complex mechanical design" and relatively low cost of parts adding up to just over $206, hundreds less than the $599 the assembled package sells for to consumers, IHS Markit Technology stated in a recent blog post. Isn't it fun to be an early adopter? To be fair, the total bill-of-materials (BOM), as it's called, doesn't factor in expenses beyond just the individual hardware, such as marketing, design and engineering, and everything else involved in bringing a new product to market. And in this case, the Rift isn't just a new product, it's a groundbreaking item that finally taps into... Read more...
It's game-on between the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift, both of which are battling for supremacy in the virtual reality space, but is one better than the other? That's a point of debate—both have their pluses and minuses, and while you're putting check marks underneath each one for various categories, go ahead and give one to the Vive in the teardown section. The Vive proved slightly easier to operate on than the Rift, according to the experts at iFixIt who don't get a bit wobbly in the knees when tearing down expensive hardware. Just as they did with the Rift last month, the fearless crew made quick work of disassembling the many parts that make up the Vive, starting with the interchangeable foam... Read more...
Apple's been on a mission to shrink its mobile products for consumers who prefer smaller size gadgets, hence the recent releases of the iPhone SE and 9.7-inch iPad Pro. The folks at iFixIt already took the liberty of gutting the former, and now it's the latter that's fallen on the teardown site's operating table. Folks, don't try this at home.No, seriously don't try tearing into a 9.7-inch iPad Pro, there's a good chance something will go wrong. In stark contrast to the iPhone SE, which surprisingly turned out to be somewhat easy to open up and repair (for an Apple product), the newest iPad Pro makes it clear that you're not supposed to be disassembling this thing.As Apple often likes to do,... Read more...
Following months of rumors and speculation, Apple two weeks ago did what everyone pretty much expected it would, which was announce a smaller size iPhone model with modern guts. Dubbed the iPhone SE, it's not so much a new iPhone as it is a shrinkage of the iPhone 6s. Lest there be any doubt about this, a teardown analysis of the iPhone SE shows parts from multiple generation iPhones stuffed into a 4-inch body.We're not saying there's anything wrong with that, we're just calling a spade a spade (or calling a fig a fig, as the Greeks used to say). In this case, the iPhone SE is a mash-up of iPhone 5, iPhone 6, and iPhone 6s parts, all neatly assembled underneath a 4-inch display for people who... Read more...
Even though some may cringe at the thought of the highly anticipated, $600 Oculus Rift being dissected instead of enjoyed, you have to hand it to the folks over at iFixit for giving this season’s hottest tech gadget the teardown treatment. Today, we’re give some insight into how relatively easy it is to repair the device should you manage to drop it during dizzying gaming matches and would rather take your chances with a a screwdriver and a spudger than send it off for repair. Getting inside the Rift is surprisingly easy, starting with the thick foam frame that sits against your face. It’s held in place with clips instead of screws, which aids in the quick removal process. With the padding out... Read more...
Despite its rugged exterior designed to protect it from the unforgiving clumsiness of grade school kids, the ASUS Chromebook C202 is surprisingly easy to operate on and repair at home. That's the takeaway from iFixIt's latest teardown, which noted that "opening the C202 was easier than sticking a straw in a juice box." Presumably they're talking about an actual juice box and not a Capri Sun, the latter of which is the bane of any thirsty child looking for a quick hit.The Chromebook C202's friendly serviceability isn't by accident. ASUS intentionally designed the C202 to be both "classroom-rugged" and easy to disassemble and repair, should the need arise. Both are touted as features of the C202,... Read more...
There's always that one kid who instead of playing with his toys, he takes them apart to see what makes them tick. He's the neighbor who turned his Rubik's Cube into a pile of squares, straightened out his Slinky, and disassembled his Voltron (fist bump if you get any of those references, your childhood rocked). And now? Those types of curious characters post teardown evaluations of pricey gadgets, perhaps none better than the brave folks at iFixIt, who just tore into Samsung's new Galaxy S7 handset.Android fans hold Samsung's Galaxy phones in high regard, and with good reason—they typically blend high-end hardware with desirable features, and starting with the Galaxy S6 series, premium construction... Read more...
Show of hands, how many of you are reading this from an iPad Pro? Anyone? Well that's weird, we were under the impression (provided by Apple CEO Tim Cook) that the iPad Pro was going to kill off the market for traditional PCs and "deluded" devices like Microsoft's Surface Book. Should Cook's prediction eventually prove accurate (it won't), a teardown analysis of the iPad Pro could be the most important thing ever (it isn't, but it's interesting, so keep reading).As is often the case, the steady handed folks at iFixIt played the part of tech surgeon, this time with the iPad Pro as its patient. Right off the bat, they ran into adhesive -- a lot of it, which required applying heat to the tablet's... Read more...
It's hard to tell if today's increasingly thin and light laptops pose engineering challenges that cause them to be built in a way that diminish opportunities for do-it-yourself repair, or if the companies making these things purposely make it difficult. Either way, a teardown analysis of Microsoft's new Surface Book laptop shows why an extended warranty might be a good idea. We'll come back to the topic of warranties, but first, let's discuss the Surface Book's teardown. As usual, it was the fearless folks at iFixIt who tore into the Surface Book like a kid on Christmas, only imagine one of those toys that come taped and wired to the box in such a way that it takes an inordinately long time to... Read more...
Google is prepping a new flagship phone for pre-order sale, the Nexus 6P, and it looks every bit a top-end device. Naturally the only logical thing to do with a high-tech handset loaded to the brim with cutting edge components is tear into the sucker and get a close-up look at its guts. Ah, but save yourself the cost and stress and disassembling a $500 device, it's already been done.Fresh off a teardown analysis of the Surface Pro 4, the gutty geeks at iFixIt turned their attention from tablets to smartphones by prying open the Nexus 6P. The teardown actually represents a first for the website -- yes, they've taken apart scores of phones and Android products in the past, but this is the first... Read more...
Microsoft is fond of referring to the Surface Pro as a tablet that can replace your laptop, and based on our experience with them, it's not an incorrect statement, at least from a performance and usability standpoint. But as a teardown of the Surface Pro 4 reminds us, there is in fact a difference between tablet PCs and laptops at large.The folks at iFixIt put Microsoft's new Surface Pro 4 tablet on the operating table and carved into it like a pumpkin being prepped for Halloween. Well, eventually they did -- like the Surface Pro  3, the new model proved difficult to disassemble right from the get-go due to a liberal use of adhesive holding it together.It took some specialty tools to pry... Read more...
As we can attest, it's important to maintain relationships in the tech media industry, otherwise it's a lonely and difficult road. That doesn't mean giving companies special treatment, but it does entail respecting things like non disclosure agreements (NDAs). The folks at iFixIt didn't do that with regards to the recently announced fourth generation Apple TV box and now they're paying the price. What happened is iFixIt secured an Apple TV dev kit, which is a pre-release model intended to give developers a chance to build and test their apps on the new model before it becomes publicly available. iFixIt then proceeded to disassemble the set-top box and post a teardown analysis on its blog. Cool... Read more...
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