Items tagged with Teardown

The Samsung Galaxy Note 9 officially went on sale last week (read the HotHardware review here), and it brings an incredible wealth of features to the table, along with an enormous price tag ($999+). But for those that are hip to the idea of an S Pen-equipped flagship phone, there are deals to be had. With that being said, now that the Galaxy Note 9 is out in the wild, it means that the gadget repair gurus at iFixit have given the smartphone the teardown treatment. We're now privy to a plethora of high-resolution shots and a step-by-step process on how to disassemble this mobile beast. With a bit of heat and suction applied to the back glass panel (which is glued on), it pops... Read more...
The expectation when purchasing a pricey augmented reality headset (or any augmented, virtual, or mixed realty headset, really) is that you'll never need to take it apart to troubleshoot a faulty component. Nevertheless, it is nice to know you can, should the need or desire to arise for any reason. And that is the case with the Magic Leap One, as a new teardown analysis reveals. Magic Leap's AR goggles recently launched to developers with a $2,295 starting price. That's obviously way above what consumers expect to pay for an AR headset, but considering it's a developer release (more specifically, the Creator Edition), it's not out of line with the competition—the developer version of Microsoft's... Read more...
Initial impressions of Microsoft's smaller Surface device, the Surface Go, are overwhelmingly possible with several reviews heaping on the praise. There is a lot to like about a more portable and affordable Surface. There are also compromises that come with form factor. Those compromises are highlighted in a new teardown analysis that reveals a sticky situation for DIY repairs. If you have the right tools, cracking open the Surface Go is not that difficult, though you will have to wrestle with adhesive right from the get-go. One thing that works in the Surface Go's favor, however, is its smaller size compared to other Surface products. It also has a sturdy display, so prying it off is not all... Read more...
If you have any aspirations of buying a 2018 MacBook Pro and performing repairs on your own (should the need arise) think again. As with many of Apple's products, the MacBook Pro is intentionally designed to keep users from mucking around inside. Apple is not alone in this regard, of course, but a recent teardown of the MacBook Pro highlights just how difficult it is to service one of these machines. It's not all bad—gaining access to the guts isn't terribly difficult, though you will need a special tool to remove the six pentalope screws on the bottom. Once you've done that, the bottom cover lifts off with ease, revealing a spate of electronics that make the MacBook Pro tick. And from... Read more...
The Essential Phone introduced the concept of a notched a display, which Apple later popularized with its iPhone X. After that, several notable Android Phones from various manufacturers followed suit, and so a trend was born. Not everyone is crazy about the notch, though. In fact, many people downright despise it. Enter a company called Vivo, which introduced the Nex with an all-screen display that drops the notch. In place of a notch, the front-camera cleverly pops up from the top. A recent teardown of the Nex reveals exactly how this clever solution is implemented. We'll get to that in a moment, but first here's a rundown of the specs. The Nex features a 6.59-inch 1080p+ Ultra FullView display.... Read more...
Tesla has made a big name for itself in a relatively brief time as the go-to company for high-tech and long-range electric vehicles. Tesla's cars look very good on the outside, but what about the parts under the skin that we can’t see? Engineering company Munro & Associates has taken Tesla's latest car, the Model 3, and torn the car apart to see how well it is built. According to the engineering firm, where Tesla truly excels is in the battery pack and related power electronics. Munro & Associates went so far as to say that it was "shocked" by the advanced techniques that Tesla used in integrating the battery and electronics. This sort of electronics and battery excellence... Read more...
Dell’s XPS 15 2-In-1 is a unique hybrid convertible, premium ultrabook in a couple of respects, partly because of its high quality Dell XPS series machined aluminum and hybrid carbon fiber construction, along with its beautiful 15-inch, 400 nits, near bezel-less Dell Infinity Edge display. However, the machine is also powered by a unique processor that marks the first collaboration of its kind by two archrivals in the PC processor arena, both Intel and AMD. Otherwise known as Kaby Lake G, the new Intel 8th Gen Core Series with integrated AMD Radeon RX Vega M graphics is a potent hybrid chip that offers discrete graphics horsepower and 4GB of HMB2 memory, coupled with Intel quad-core... Read more...
Growing up, if something broke, you took out some tools and fixed it. These days, however, things are different. It's not that consumers don't have a knack for fixing things, or desire (I believe there are many that still do), but we're living in a sophisticated electronics age with devices that are increasingly difficult to repair. It's refreshing, then, that HTC's Vive Pro bucks the trend, as revealed in a teardown analysis. More often than not, it seems when the folks at iFixIt get their paws on a premium electronic device, it's a scary endeavor for anyone sitting on the sidelines. Need an example? Revisit the iPad 6 teardown from earlier this month, or the Galaxy S9+ teardown that came before... Read more...
Huawei has been making waves with its flagship phones, though it has been having a tough time getting a major wireless carrier in the United States to go against the government's security warnings and sell devices stateside. That's a topic for another day. What's of interest today is a teardown of the company's newest high-end device, the P20 Pro with a whopping three camera lenses on the backside. That's right, this sucker has a tri-camera configuration on the backside, all three made from Leica. The arrangement includes a 20-megapixel monochrome shooter, 40-megapixel RGB lens, and an 8-megapixel telephoto camera. It also features a 5X hybrid zoom and AI-enhanced image stabilization, along the... Read more...
Maybe one day Apple will release an iPad that is relatively easy to crack open and service on your own, at home, in case you need to replace a critical component or swap out an aging battery. We're not holding our breath. Apple's latest 9.7-inch iPad announced last week and built around its A10 Fusion processor has now gone under the knife, and as expected, it is quite the ordeal tearing one of these suckers down. Apple is not alone here, of course. For the most part, tablets have always been difficult to tear into, regardless of whether it's an iPad (iOS) or Android model from any number of manufacturers. Many of today's thin and light laptops are the same way, as are most smartphones. That... Read more...
The iPhone 8 looks similar to the iPhone 7, which itself looks similar to the iPhone 6, and on down the line. In some respects, smartphone design finds itself in a state of stagnation. In an attempt to buck that trend, Apple launched an iPhone X model alongside its new iPhone 8 phones. It is a celebratory product in recognition of the iPhone's 10-year anniversary, and it a features a bit of a different design than the iPhone 8 and previous iterations. Putting it under the knife, however, reveals that not much is different in terms of do-it-yourself repairability. Apple's highly sought-after iPhone X found itself on the operating table at iFixIt, an experienced tech surgeon that has disassembled... Read more...
The iPhone 8 is out and that means it is time for a teardown. To ensure a timely dissection of Apple's latest generation smartphone, the technology surgeons at iFixIt hopped on a plane and headed to the Circuitwise headquarters in Sydney, Australia, where the local time is a full 14 hours ahead of the Eastern Time Zone, and 17 hours in front of the Pacific Time Zone. Talk about commitment! While the location of this latest smartphone operation may have changed, the process of tearing into an iPhone device has not, at least for the most part. It starts with the removal of pentalobe screws and then heating up the display to loosen the adhesive and free up the waterproof seals. After slicing through... Read more...
It seems like a million years ago when Samsung was known for using plastic in the construction of its Galaxy handsets, which had removable batteries to boot. But like most smartphone makers, Samsung went the premium route with tightly fused glass and metal. That is also the case with its recently introduced Galaxy Note 8, and as a teardown of the device reveals, liberal use of adhesive continues to rule the day.Unlike the phones of yesteryear, most of today's high-end handsets are designed to stay closed up and sealed tightly enough to keep the elements out. As a result, the Galaxy Note 8 is glued shut. The teardown folks at iFixIt turned to a familiar method of applying heat to melt and soften... Read more...
Andy Rubin’s Essential Phone has definitely gotten off to a rocky start. Following the flagship Android smartphone’s debut, Essential faced disappointing shipping delays, and more recently, a rather embarrassing violation of user privacy. Now, Essential Phone is being assaulted from another front thanks to a new teardown report from iFixit. Actually getting into the device proved more difficult than expected, as iFixit’s usual arsenal of sharp tools and heat guns were ineffective at [non-destructive] penetration into the Essential Phone’s frame. There are few visible seams (along with heavy-handed applications of adhesives), making it damn near impossible to get into the device using conventional... Read more...
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