Items tagged with Syrian Electronic Army

On Thursday, some people visiting a selection of major news websites were surprised by a rogue popup saying that they have been hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army. The attacks seemed to have been focused on North American and British media organizations by the hacker group that is linked to the Assad regime. According to reports from various users on Twitter, some of the affected sites include CNBC, Forbes, PCWorld, The Daily Telegraph, The Independent, and the Chicago Tribune. Visitors are being greeted by a random popup that reads, “You’ve been hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA)” which is then followed by a picture. The popup message along with the picture that follows it Despite... Read more...
Wondering why it's still a good idea to run security software on your system even if you practice safe computing habits? One reason is because even legitimate websites get hacked, and depending on the extent of the attack, visiting what you thought was a benign domain could open up a can of worms. It doesn't matter how large the site is either -- just ask Facebook, latest victim of the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA). Hackers representing the SEA tried to take control of the Facebook.com domain by hacking into the social networking site's registrar, MarkMonitor, which has a number of high profile clients and "strong security practices" in place, according to a SecurityWeek report. The hackers were... Read more...
Just as Ricky Ricardo would often tell Lucille Ball in some manner or another, "Microsoft, you've got some explaining to do!" For the second time in less than two weeks, hackers representing the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) are taking credit for infiltrating Microsoft's Twitter account and posting messages warning people not to use the company's email services. The messages are almost exactly the same as the ones posted on New Year's Day when the SEA hijacked Microsoft's Twitter and Skype accounts, along with Skype's Facebook page. Those initial tweets stayed online for over two hours and were retweeted over 8,200 times before Microsoft took back control of its account on the holiday. Many employees... Read more...