Items tagged with supercomputer

A game show with two award winners, a famed host, and a supercomputer as a contestant. What is Jeopardy? That's actually correct. Next month, Jeopardy will air a series of episodes with just two human contestants, and one human host. Brad Rutter, Alex Trebek and Ken Jennings will be joined by a rather unusual opponent and guest, an IBM-built supercomputer named Watson. Jennings and Rutter are two of Jeopardy's most winning players ever, while Watson has never actually played on-air before. How will the machine do? Will it embarrass itself? Or will it dominate the humans much like supercomputers have dominated chess champions of this world? It's hard to say for sure, but IBM has been perfecting... Read more...
NVIDIA isn't just a graphics company. Many only think of the company's GPU line, which is certainly their most forward segment in the industry. But they're also a software company, and they also make all sorts of other hardware (like the 3D Vision kit for example). They also operate in the high performance computing space.  Recently, the Tesla Personal Supercomputer made its debut, and clearly the company has a mind to create even more robust supercomputer systems. DARPA, the U.S. Defense Department's research and development arm, just granted NVIDIA with a huge gift, and a huge responsibility. $25 million is headed the company's way, and it will be working with Cray, Inc., Oak Ridge National... Read more...
Supercomputers are everywhere, but they hardly get the attention that they deserve. Hundreds of these huge machines churn out all sorts of data and analysis that many humans use in their everyday life, but most take it for granted. By and large, supercomputers have been "stale" and "boring" to average consumers. After all, you can't exactly buy and use your own supercomputer (at least not without tons of cash and a really good application), but Virginia Tech's new supercomputer is different. As the worlds of the CPU and GPU have collided over the years, the same thing now seems to be happening in the supercomputer realm. The university has acquired a $2 million grant that will allow them to build... Read more...
Supercomputers and mainframes can get somewhat overwhelming to the average consumer, but IBM's latest at least have a video to go along with them. The new contraption is called the zEnterprise mainframe server, which is a new systems design that allows workloads on mainframe, POWER7 and System x servers to share resources and be managed as a single, virtualized system. It's not only the most powerful and energy-efficient mainframe ever, but it could lead to interesting new usage models for consumer PCs. The new systems design combines IBM's new zEnterprise mainframe server with new technology--the IBM zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension and the IBM zEnterprise Unified Resource Manager--that enable... Read more...
Wow, it's actually happening. If you'll recall, reports were flying last year that IBM's supercomputer, a guy by the name of Watson, would one day appear on one of the most famed game shows in the history of television: Jeopardy!. After two years of development and another year of tweaking, Watson is now starring in a Jeopardy! competition video on the world's most famous video viewing portal. What is YouTube? IBM has pit their supercomputers against humans before. Deep Blue has been known to play chess against some of the world's greatest players, but playing a game with a finite number of moves and possibilities is entirely different than playing a trivia game with any number of questions from... Read more...
We're sensing a trend here, and Maingear is helping to substantiate our assumptions. Right after NVIDIA announced their new GeForce GTX 470 and 480 GPUs, Maingear has arrived with new high performance gaming PCs that have none other than NVIDIA's Fermi graphics cards in them. Of course, the SHIFT "personal supercomputer" is the first to arrive on the scene, with "a dedicated 3D engine designed from the ground up for DX11 tesselation, 2 times the CUDA cores for raw computing power, a dedicated 3D engine that supports realtime ray tracing for dynamic realism, and enhanced depth of field and image quality." Not bad, yeah? The machines are up for order now on the company's website. MAINGEAR High... Read more...
IBM and supercomputers go together like beans and rice (or CPUs and motherboards, for the non-chefs out there), but the company's latest is one of its most impressive to date. Hailed as the most powerful computing system in all of Rhode Island, the multimillion-dollar supercomputer at Brown's Center for Computation and Visualization is a real token of pride for both the institution and IBM as a company. It was built to be used by researchers statewide to tackle "grand challenges" affecting Ocean State residents in climate change, education, energy and health. Both entities will be working with government, universities, hospitals, nonprofit organizations, businesses and other entities in Rhode... Read more...
Another one bites the dust, as they say. Though we can only imagine the demand for supercomputers is on the rise as more and more companies, institutions and universities look to crunch massive quantities of data, there's apparently no room for SiCortex. The company, which angled itself as a different kind of supercomputer creator, has reportedly halted operations over the weekend according to an executive at the company. Further details aren't being provided right now, but it's widely assumed that the company simply ran out of cash.Unlike most of its rivals, SiCortex was in the business of making "green" supercomputers that were generally much more energy-efficient than available alternatives.... Read more...
We know it's cliché, but really, what will they think up next? Just last month, researchers at IBM developed a supercomputer that could track some of the oldest English words to ever be uttered, and now another powerful machine will be tasked with taking on some of the quickest minds this planet has to offer... on one of America's most adored game shows.Yep, sometime in the future an IBM machine will be competing with valedictorians and Quiz Bowl champions of yesteryear on Jeopardy! The system, which has been coined 'Watson,' has taken some two years to develop, with the sophisticated Question Answering (QA) system hoping to beat out quick minds and understand some of life's most complex inquiries.... Read more...
Who said supercomputers were only good for powering governmental facilities and handling the dirty work for NASA? At the University of Reading in the UK, scientists have been able to utilize an immensely powerful IBM ThamesBlue supercomputer in order to find the oldest words in the English language. According to a release pushed out by IBM on the subject, it took "an average of six weeks to perform a computational task such as comparing two sets of words in different languages," and once its brawny machine stepped in, that time was cut down to "a few hours." Evolutionary language scientists at the institution long believed that they would be unable to track words back in time for more than 5,000... Read more...
AMD Supercomputer To Deliver Next-Generation Games and Applications Entirely Through the Cloud(CES) - Today at CES, AMD President and Chief Executive Officer Dirk Meyer and OTOY Chief Executive Officer Jules Urbach unveiled a plan to revolutionize the deployment, development and delivery of HD content through the “AMD Fusion Render Cloud”, a massively-parallel supercomputer.  The announcement took place during AMD’s Industry Insider Series keynote at the Las Vegas Hilton Theater, where AMD was joined on stage by industry luminaries such as Lucasfilm, Dell, HP and Electronic Arts. “AMD has a long track record in the supercomputing world. Seven out of 10 of the world’s fastest machines,... Read more...
Large corporations, universities, and research labs have relied on high-performance computers (HPC)--or "supercomputers"--for years to solve complex problems in science, engineering, financial modeling, and other similar uses requiring advanced, heavy-duty computations. The high cost of these systems and their complexity have often kept them out of the hands of smaller companies, institutions, and departments that don't have the budget or resources to purchase and maintain them. Cray ("The Supercomputer Company"--yes, that supercomputer company) in partnership with Microsoft, hope to rectify that with today's announcement of an "affordable" supercomputer, the Cray CX1.    Credit: Cray... Read more...
T2K Open Supercomputer Systems with Quad-Core AMD Opteron Processors Now in Operation — Computing power, scalability and energy-efficiency of the Quad-Core AMD Opteron processor contributes to supercomputers with specifications developed by University of Tsukuba, University of Tokyo, and Kyoto University — TOKYO — June 2, 2008 — AMD Japan (NYSE: AMD) today announced the official start of operation of the T2K supercomputer systems featuring Quad-Core AMD Opteron processors and with specifications developed jointly by the University of Tsukuba, the University of Tokyo, and Kyoto University. These T2K systems were delivered to the University of Tsukuba by Cray Japan Inc. and Sumisho Computer Systems,... Read more...
If you thought that quad-core rig of yours was fast, wait until you see what the folks at the University of Edinburgh's Advanced Computer Facility have just unveiled..."Hector -- or the High-End Computing Terascale Resource -- can handle 63 trillion calculations per second, which is the equivalent processing power of 12,000 desktop systems and four times faster than its predecessor. The amount of calculations the system can handle is equivalent to every person on earth simultaneously carrying out 10,000 calculations per second. The supercomputer is based at the University of Edinburgh's Advanced Computer Facility near the Scottish capital and will cost $221.3 million (113 million pounds)... Read more...
Researchers at MIT have developed chip architecture that runs on 70 percent less voltage than a conventional processor. The savings in power consumption would have profound effects on the battery life you could expect from portable devices. They may even require only movement and body heat to power chip-enabled sensors and communication devices. "It will extend the battery lifetime of portable devices in areas like medical electronics," said Anantha Chandrakasan, a professor of electrical engineering at MIT. "When you look at the digital processor, the fact is that we may be able to reduce the energy needed by 10 times."Better circuit design and batteries have already led to smaller, more-mobile... Read more...
When you think of supercomputers, you usually imagine a bunch of IBM looking fellows and ladies wearing white lab coats and clutching clipboards in a clean room next to a big  rack of silicon. But that's old-fashioned thinking;  New Zealand computer scientist Peter Gutman did some calculations, and the most powerful supercomputer in the world right now just might be the Storm Worm botnet. And criminals didn't put it together to play chess with Gary Kasparov. Malware researchers tracking the threat are privately awed by the sheer volume of spam with social engineering lures to malicious executables. “It’s nonstop, never-ending,” said a virus analyst at a major computer security firm.... Read more...
The National Science Foundation is prepared to award IBM with a contract to construct the world’s fastest supercomputer the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. The machine cost $200 million to construct and could cost over $400 million during its five-year lifespan. Designated as the “super” supercomputer, it will be the first to break the petaflop barrier, capable of one thousand trillion mathematical calculations per second. It’s intended use will be for Grand Challenge science projects, such as simulating the effects of global warming. What’s interesting is that processing power was once used mostly for military design and research. For instance, the fastest computers in the U.S.... Read more...
It looks like the trend of making more energy efficient PCs has spread from common laptops, desktops and servers, all the way up to supercomputers.  The system is designed for defense and scientific research. "Called Maxwell, the computer has been built at the University of Edinburgh and uses field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) in place of conventional processors. Its Scottish developers believe Maxwell represents a new generation of compact and energy-efficient computers. Unlike ordinary general-purpose processors, FPGA chips can be programmed to perform very specific tasks. Once that programming is accomplished, FPGA chips can be much faster than performing the same tasks in software... Read more...
If you've ever wondered what some of today's top supercomputers are up to, this article on CNN explains many of the more common applications.  Some of them are used for tasks like forecasting weather, designing safer more fuel-efficient cars, mapping DNA, exploring the cosmos and even calculating the curvature of Pringles potato chips. "Supercomputers allow researchers to do in real time -- meaning days, weeks or months -- what could not be done during a lifetime with a single personal computer. "The amount of data that some of these supercomputers [produce] would be, maybe as much as 100,000 times more data than what you can put... Read more...
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