Items tagged with S.E.A.

On Thursday, some people visiting a selection of major news websites were surprised by a rogue popup saying that they have been hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army. The attacks seemed to have been focused on North American and British media organizations by the hacker group that is linked to the Assad regime. According to reports from various users on Twitter, some of the affected sites include CNBC, Forbes, PCWorld, The Daily Telegraph, The Independent, and the Chicago Tribune. Visitors are being greeted by a random popup that reads, “You’ve been hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA)” which is then followed by a picture. The popup message along with the picture that follows it Despite... Read more...
Another day, another hack. This time it was the Forbes website that was compromised, and once again it’s the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) that claimed responsibility for the hack. Forbes posted a message on Facebook announcing the hack and said that anyone who’s registered with the site should change their passwords. The thieves made off with passwords, too, although those were encrypted and should be safe. However, portions of the Forbes site are down, including the blog section. (Click to enlarge) The SEA took credit for the breach on Twitter, posting both a screenshot of the admin panel and a users table with a database of some 16,000 names. “We didn't publish the user table... Read more...
Wondering why it's still a good idea to run security software on your system even if you practice safe computing habits? One reason is because even legitimate websites get hacked, and depending on the extent of the attack, visiting what you thought was a benign domain could open up a can of worms. It doesn't matter how large the site is either -- just ask Facebook, latest victim of the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA). Hackers representing the SEA tried to take control of the Facebook.com domain by hacking into the social networking site's registrar, MarkMonitor, which has a number of high profile clients and "strong security practices" in place, according to a SecurityWeek report. The hackers were... Read more...
Earlier this month the Syrian Electronic Army hacked Microsoft’s Twitter account (twice), posting messages telling users not to use Microsoft’s email systems, ostensibly because the company was “monitoring your accounts and selling the data to the governments”. The SEA is back at it, defacing Microsoft’s Office Blog by adding a “hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army” line after some articles. The newly-redesigned Office Blog was hacked just hours after its launch, but Microsoft told The Verge that everything was back under control. A Microsoft spokesperson said, "A targeted cyberattack temporarily affected the Microsoft Office blog. The account was quickly... Read more...
Just as Ricky Ricardo would often tell Lucille Ball in some manner or another, "Microsoft, you've got some explaining to do!" For the second time in less than two weeks, hackers representing the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) are taking credit for infiltrating Microsoft's Twitter account and posting messages warning people not to use the company's email services. The messages are almost exactly the same as the ones posted on New Year's Day when the SEA hijacked Microsoft's Twitter and Skype accounts, along with Skype's Facebook page. Those initial tweets stayed online for over two hours and were retweeted over 8,200 times before Microsoft took back control of its account on the holiday. Many employees... Read more...
The New York Times’ website is having a rough month. Only a couple weeks after maintenance troubles caused several hours of downtime, the iconic paper has again experienced a major disruption. This time, the outage is clearly the result of an attack. The hacker group known as SyrianElectronicArmy claimed responsibility for the attack, as well as attacks on Twitter and The Huffington Post UK. The attack took place Tuesday afternoon, knocking out the site for readers. As a precaution, The New York Times limited email use for its staff and journalists. In the case of each website, the hacker changed the DNS information to reflect its victory. The New York Times posted an article on the hack,... Read more...