Items tagged with Raspberry Pi

We recently set out to design mini desktop computer with the wildly popular Raspberry Pi single board computer. The Raspberry Pi is a Linux-driven, ARM processor-based micro computer that is known for its low cost and small size. People use the device for a variety of projects, from micro-servers to low cost media players. Basically our goal was to turn what is currently one of the cheapest bare-bones computer boards into a fully enclosed mini desktop computer that could be taken anywhere without the need for cabling or setup. One of the high level goals of this project was also to learn about programming with Linux and get a good feel for programming in the Debian interface.  Behold, the... Read more...
If you snooze you lose, and so it goes with the $25 Model A version of the Raspberry Pi, a credit card sized Linux PC that became available to purchase in the U.S. on Easter Sunday. Despite the holiday being a time to relax, plenty of people in the U.S. saw fit to fork over their financial information and order the Model A, which is now sold out. Texas-based Allied Electronics listed both the Model A and slightly more expensive Model B ($35) yesterday morning, and both are out of stock at the time of this writing. "Due to limited supply of the Raspberry Pi Model A, we are not offering pre-orders or backorders on the product at this time," Allied Electronics states on the item's product page.... Read more...
If you’ve been itching to get your hands on the $25 Model A version of the Raspberry Pi, your wait is almost over. In fact, you can buy one today if you’re in Europe. The folks at Raspberry Pi are making the new computer available at RS Components and Premier Farnell in Europe (and only for orders in Europe) at the moment, but an announcement on the company blog assures the rest of the world that they’ll lift the Europe-only restriction “very soon.” The Raspberry Pi Model A is a tiny, $25 computer that can run a variety of Linux distributions. If you're new to the Raspberry scene, the Magpi magazine might be a good way to get some ideas. For Raspberry Pi, the Model... Read more...
The do-it-yourself Raspberry Pi boasts some pretty modest specs, but it's been proven time and time again that it's no slouch where gaming's concerned. In November, it was announced that Minecraft is being ported to the platform (it's still not here as of the time of this post), and not long after, the Raspberry Pi App Store was rolled-out offering a couple of open-source games that run just fine on the platform. OpenArena will look instantly recognizable to anyone who's ever played Quake III, as it's based on the open-source port of the id Tech 3 engine, ioquake3. Development has been on-going since 2005, though the game is still not considered "final" software. However, it's still very well-developed... Read more...
In Field of Dreams, farmer Ray Kinsella heard a voice that said, "If you build it, he will come." The Raspberry Pi Foundation must have heard a similar whisper about building a low-cost PC, and like Kinsella, the company was wise to listen, having likely sold a million Raspberry Pi boards to date. "The folks at element 14/Premier Farnell announced today that they alone have now made and sold more than half a million Raspberry Pis. They’re only one of two official distributors; we don’t have completely up-to-date figures from RS Components yet, but Farnell’s news suggests that we’re well on the way to having sold our millionth Raspberry Pi," the Raspberry Pi Foundation... Read more...
If you’ve been following the evolution of the tiny-and-inexpensive computer Raspberry Pi, you’re probably not too surprised to know that the Pi Store launched today to give budding and mature developers and chance to share and sell their programs.   The Pi Store is an X application under Raspbian and is also accessible on the Web at store.raspberrypi.com. The store is launching with a modest 23-title catalog, but that number is likely to increase pretty quickly as hobbyists and developers rush to get their projects approved. Raspberry is encouraging folks to add their own tutorials to the Pi Store to help fellow hobbyists, and it’s offering free sprite packages for game... Read more...
If you’re one to tinker with computers, you probably already know about the Raspberry Pi Model B, which is a tiny, barebones computer that consumes very little power and cost a mere $35. It really is a no-frills system – it doesn’t even have a case – which is what makes the system so appealing to many DIYers: what you do with the little computer is up to you. Now, Raspberry is offering a $25 Model A, which boasts even lower power consumption. Just because the Raspberry Pi Model A is newer doesn’t mean that it’s better, though. Raspberry designed the two Pis for different uses. Where the Model B is aimed at DIYers and educational settings,... Read more...
At long last, the ultra small and cheap Raspberry Pi Model A is now being produced, with the first samples already coming off the assembly line, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced in a blog post. The $35 Model B has been available to purchase for some time now, while the Model A is a slightly downgraded version that will sell for $25. "We’re having a very busy, very mobile couple of days," the Raspberry Pi Foundation said. "We’ve been talking to Welsh teachers, spending time at the factory in Pencoed, doing EMC testing on the camera boards, picking up engineering samples of the Model A, visiting suppliers, and generally running up and down the south of England and Wales with our... Read more...
"But does it run Minecraft?" Yes - it's the tamer version of the age-old Crysis question, but it's an important one given Minecraft's amazing success. While mobile gamers have access to Minecraft: Pocket Edition, those who own DIY Raspberry Pi boards have been out of luck. But, thanks to the hard work by the developers at Mojang, that initial question above can soon be answered with a resounding "Yes!". It's important to note the "official" distinction here. This isn't the result of someone just fooling around with the RPi who manages to get Minecraft to run in some sub-par way. Rather, it's ported over by the guys who know how to pull it off successfully. The RPi is hardly a powerhouse, but... Read more...
Want to know what we love about the concept of a beer keyboard? Absolutely everything! Sure, they make an unlikely couple, but don't tell that to the folks at Robofun who went out and actually built a working keyboard out of beer cans and other parts. "Yup, we’re talking about a keyboard that has beer cans instead of keys. All you have to do to use it is to gently touch a beer can. It behaves exactly as a regular keyboard (e.g. you can plug it in any computer or laptop)," the developers explain. Even if you haven't acquired a taste for the working man's nectar, you have to admit, the contraption is pretty awesome. It consists of 40 beer cans connected to an Arduino powered touch-capacitive... Read more...
The tiny Raspberry Pi mini PC got a major performance boost today, thanks to a RAM upgrade. The super-inexpensive computer now has 512MB of RAM instead of 256MB – at the same $35 price. And with the initial shipping hiccups behind them, the Raspberry Pi Foundation and its distributors are proving to be pretty flexible: any Model B orders that haven’t been fulfilled are being automatically upgraded from the 256MB version to the new 512MB computer.   The Raspberry Pi is a super-small computer. The Foundation gives priority to the system’s price over its performance, which means that it’s likely to remain affordable, but that upgrades are done slowly and... Read more...
Raspberry Pi is one of the biggest little names of 2012, promising a Linux-based micro PC for as little as $35. A $35 PC could obviously do wonders for the world at large, in developing nations and beyond, but there's just one problem: shipping. It's turning out to be fairly tough for a company to create a Linux-based PC en masse for as little as $35, but at least the company is keeping people informed. After missing initial shipping estimates, they've now stated that a delay is inevitable. Here's the quote: "We have spoken with BIS this morning, and they have confirmed that, given the volumes involved and the demographic mix of likely users, any development board exemption is not applicable... Read more...
Despite what you may have read or heard recently, Raspberry Pi Foundation's much anticipated $25 PC will be available to purchase by the end of this month, the company said in a statement today. There had been some confusion as to when consumers would be able to get their hands on one after snippets of an upcoming interview with Raspberry Pi's co-creator David Braben appeared online, in which he seemed to indicate to Eurogamer that a release wouldn't happen until the third quarter of this year. That's not the case. "The 'consumer release' that Eurogamer is talking about is actually the educational release, which, as you'll be aware if you've been hanging out on our forums, will come with a kid-targeted... Read more...
It's been years since Nicholas Negroponte unveiled his plans to develop a $100 laptop that would be made available to anyone in the developing world. While Negroponte's price point remains out of reach, a new, independent UK organization has released a prototype of its own computer—a $25 USB key that packs a full machine into a form factor not much larger than a traditional thumb drive. David Braben, of Rollercoaster Tycoon fame, developed the diminutive Raspberry Pi as a computer that all students could have access to, regardless of income. The system's specs are as follows: 700 MHz ARM11 128MB RAM Supports OpenGL ES 2.0 1080p30 H.264 decode Composite/HDMI video output USB 2.0 SD/MMC/SDIO... Read more...
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