Items tagged with Nehalem

For years, Intel's integrated GPUs were the laughing stock of gaming and a thorn in the side of everyone who purchased what they thought was a high-end laptop or desktop only to find its video solution suffered from a deep delusion of competence. Faced with lacerating low-end graphics competition from the likes of both AMD and NVIDIA, Intel responded with the surprisingly adequate 45nm GPU fused into its Arrandale and Clarkdale processors. Having proven its ability to wheeze once around the track, Intel has set its eyes on a loftier goal. According to industry sources, the GPU partnered with the upcoming Sandy Bridge processor will be capable of smoothly playing Blu-ray 3D. Sandy Bridge will... Read more...
Yesterday, we chided AMD for its decision not to reveal more details about Bulldozer and Bobcat, but it turns out we didn't have all the facts. AMD was planning on disclosing more information later in the day at Hot Chips—but the company failed to disclose that tid-bit before we went live with our previous coverage. We're going to take a look at the new information about Bobcat and Bulldozer that's subsequently been revealed; if you want more general backround data you can get it here... Next-Gen AMD Bobcat and Bulldozer CPU Deep Dive... Read more...
Yesterday, we chided AMD for its decision not to reveal more details about Bulldozer and Bobcat, but it turns out we didn't have all the facts. AMD was planning on disclosing more information later in the day at Hot Chips—but the company failed to disclose that before we went live with our previous coverage. We're going to take a look at the new information about Bobcat and Bulldozer that's subsequently been revealed; if you want more general background data, check the links above. Bully For Bobcat We'll start with the high-level block diagram of Bobcat's architecture, then step through some of the pertinent details. Bobcat shares certain characteristics with Atom but AMD's new... Read more...
At Hot Chips 22 today, AMD will be discussing new details of its Bobcat and Bulldozer processors—but don't be surprised if some of the new information sounds familiar. With the exception of a few tidbits on Bobcat's architecture and a new Bulldozer block diagram, much of what the company discussed with us recently was revealed last November at the company's Analyst Day. For those of you who might not keep up with the company's roadmap, here's the current situation. Llano, the 32nm Phenom II-derived APU (read: CPU+GPU) that AMD was hoping to launch at the end of Q4 this year won't tip up until Q1. Normally this means "March 31st," but AMD implied that it might launch... Read more...
We first laid our hands on the Classified SR-2 at CES 2010 and were recently given the opportunity to take one for a spin around the lab. While preparing to test the board, however, a couple of important points led us in a somewhat different direction than a straight-up motherboard review. The EVGA Classified SR-2’s requirements are unlike any other desktop motherboard you’ve seen to date. And to meet those requirements meant reeling in some other exciting hardware in its own right. On the pages ahead, not only will we be checking out the EVGA Classified SR-2, but we’ll be showcasing a pair of the most powerful processors currently on the market, along with the only 6-Channel... Read more...
Every once in a while a product comes along that really gets us worked into a frenzy. Typically, the latest and greatest processors and graphics cards generate a lot of buzz around here, but some other components aren’t always as enticing for one reason or another, like motherboards for example. Don’t get us wrong, we love a great enthusiast-class motherboard with a ton of features as much as the next guy, but the majority of them just don’t have the appeal of new CPU or GPU. There are exceptions, of course. Most recently, a number of Asus’ RoG, Gigabyte’s Ultra Durable, and MSI’s Big Bang boards come to mind. And looking back boards like the legendary Abit... Read more...
AMD announced its second-quarter earnings yesterday and the company's results, while not perfect, imply continued strong execution. The company's revenue was up 40 percent year-on-year on strong demand for server and mobile parts. Total revenue was $1.65B, up five percent from the first quarter. "Robust demand for our latest mobile platforms and solid execution drove record second quarter revenue and a healthy gross margin," said Dirk Meyer, AMD President and CEO. "Our unmatched combination of microprocessor and graphics capabilities resulted in customers launching a record number of new mobile and desktop platforms. We added Sony as a microprocessor customer and continue to see our existing... Read more...
Amazon has long touted its ECS (Elastic Compute Cloud) as a flexible service for companies that need a certain amount of server time to test programs or features, but don't want to invest the time and effort themselves. Now, the company has added additional HPC (High Performance Computing) capabilities that are typically targeted towards large-scale enterprise or university buildouts. These are precisely the sorts of organizations that typically can afford to invest time/money, but Amazon is targeting potential customers that might be restrained either by a lack of available CPU time or those that are physically unable to install new/different hardware. According to Amazon's CTO Werner Vogels,... Read more...
IDC's latest report on CPU revenue and market share for Q1 2010 confirms results we saw when Intel reported its record first quarter earnings. According to the research firm, the CPU market fell just 5.6 percent from Q4 2009 to Q1 2010. Historically, CPU sales fall 8-10 percent over the same period; IDC's figures lend credence to the idea that the IT recession is beginning to break. "PC processor shipments typically decline around 7 to 8 percent going from fourth quarter to first quarter," said Shane Rau director of Semiconductors: Personal Computing research at IDC. "A decline of 5.6% is modest and wouldn't mean much by itself. However, after the huge rise in shipments we saw in the fourth quarter,... Read more...
Intel reported its sales figures for the first quarter of 2010 yesterday, and the company's market position could scarcely be better. Revenue in Q1 was $10.3 billion—a record for the quarter—while sales declined just three percent between Q4 2009 and Q1 2010. Processor shipments typically fall about nine percent during this period; Intel didn't just beat the odds, it trounced them. "The investments we're making in leading edge technology are delivering the most compelling product line-up in our history," said Paul Otellini, Intel president and CEO. "These leadership products combined with growing worldwide demand and continued outstanding execution resulted in Intel's best first quarter ever.... Read more...
Intel launched its much-anticipated Nehalem-EX processor today; the new chip could redefine performance at 4P and above. Nehalem-EX, aka Beckton, aka Xeon 6500/7500 is Nehalem at full throttle; Beckton is an eight-core/16-thread processor with up to 24MB of L3 cache or ~3MB per core compared to Nehalem's 2MB/core design. It supports up to four QPI links for glueless design implementations and features a quad-channel memory controller capable of controlling up to 16 DIMMs per socket. Intel has released a number of SKUs with different core counts, one without Hyper-Threading, varying amounts of L3 cache, and clockspeeds ranging from 1.73GHz-2.26GHz for the Hyper-Threaded CPUs and 2.66GHz one model... Read more...
It's been just over a year since AMD completed its spinoff of GlobalFoundries in an attempt to radically change its own financial trajectory. The gamble appears to have paid off for both companies; we recently sat down with GlobalFoundries executives to talk about the company's first year and plans for the future. GlobalFoundries current roadmap is as follows: The company will ship 40nm LP (low power) silicon starting this quarter and 32nm SOI in the back half of 2010. The left edge of each box denotes 'risk production,' aka early commercial production. One of the reasons we originally contacted GF was to clear up some confusion around the 32nm/28nm process nodes. When GlobalFoundries first... Read more...
Intel announced its new Xeon 5600 series today in a move the company claims is great for server admins, businesses concerned about security, world peace, and puppies. (We made those last two up). The new chips (codenamed Gulftown) are basically identical to the ultra-high-end Core i7-980X that Intel launched recently, with the exception that Xeons are MP capable. Intel claims that the new six-core processors are up to 50 percent faster than their quad-core, 45nm counterparts while remaining within the same 130W TDP envelope. Although, low-power 60W variants are also coming, as are 40W quad-cores."The Intel Xeon Processor 5600 series will be the backbone of mainstream computing environments,"... Read more...
If current rumors are to be believed, AMD's hexa-core Thuban processors are headed for desktops in the near future. First we'll see the new 890GX chipsets launching in March, with three Thuban models following on April 26. The new desktop processors will reportedly come in three flavors: Phenom II X6 1035T, 1055T, and the 1075T. We've got no idea what the numbers are supposed to represent in this case; drop a comment below if you've got a theory. Thuban, like Phenom II, will be backwards-compatible and can drop into AM3/AM2+/AM2 boards if your motherboard manufacturer provides an appropriate BIOS update. This last has proven a bit sketchy in my own personal experience. Some motherboard manufacturers... Read more...
In a blog post yesterday, AMD's director of product marketing John Fruehe announced that the company is now shipping its eight and 12-core "Magny-Cours" processors to OEMs and select manufacturers. Magny-Cours, you may recall, is AMD's next-generation server CPU and consists of two Istanbul cores side-by-side on the same package. Since AMD has no native octal-core design, it's implied that the eight-core version of Magny-Cours consists of two Istanbul processors with two cores on each disabled. If Magny-Cours is more-or-less an Istanbulx2, however, the upcoming Maranello platform is something altogether different. Maranello, which uses an LGA-style pinout, supports 16-48 cores, and provides each... Read more...
The x86 architecture has increasingly dominated the server market over the past decade but there's still a market for mainframe, big-iron servers. At present, Intel has challenged old guards Sun and IBM with a mixture of Nehalem-based Xeons and Itanium processors with the octal-core Nehalem-EX waiting in the wings. IBM isn't waiting for Nehalem-EX or Intel's new Itanium processor to hit the market before taking action of its own; Big Blue launched its POWER7 architecture on Monday. At 567mm2 and 32MB of on-die L3 cache, the new CPU is something of a beast. Each POWER7 chip is divided into eight cores each with its own L2 cache. Each core is capable of handling four threads for a total of 32 threads... Read more...
AMD revealed more information on its first Fusion-class product at ISSCC this week. The new chip will combine both a CPU and GPU on a single package, but don't use either nickname—AMD is  calling the new chip an "APU" or Application Processor Unit as part of its bid to shift product focus from the core components in a system to the tasks and workloads a system is capable of handling. Done properly, this could solve certain nomenclature confusions that have plagued the computer market from the very beginning, but we aren't holding our breath. Both AMD and Intel have tackled this type of rebranding before (think AMD Live! and Intel ViiV), with minimal success. For now, however, we'll roll... Read more...
With the International Solid-State Circuits Conference less than a week away, Intel has released additional details on its hexa-core desktop, next generation mobile and dual-core Westmere processors. Much of the dual-core data was revealed last month when the CPU manufacturer launched Clarkdale (our review is here if you want additional information on the CPU and its integrated graphics core). When Intel set its internal goals for what its calling Westmere 6C, the company aimed to boost both core and cache count by 50 percent without increasing the processor's thermal envelope. Towards this end, the new Westmere chips will incorporate additional technologies to reduce the CPU's power consumption... Read more...
The last few months have been a whirlwind of activity for AMD. Since the beginning of the fourth quarter, the manufacturer has launched new ATI HD 5000 series parts in the high-end, enthusiast, and mainstream market segments, settled its antitrust lawsuit with Intel, renegotiated its x86 licensing agreement and charted a new course that will establish GlobalFoundries as a completely independent entity. Last week, the company announced its Q4 financial results and gave additional details on what it expects for 2010. This is the last time AMD will consolidate GlobalFoundries results into its own numbers; the company's renegotiated licensing agreement with Intel has allowed it to significantly accelerate... Read more...
It's only been two weeks since Intel debuted its 32nm, Nehalem-based Clarkdale processor, but the CPU manufacturer is already planning to introduce Westmere-derived Xeon processors in the first quarter of 2010. Intel revealed its plans during its quarterly conference call last week and hinted that Nehalem-EX processors will soon see the light of day as well, but neglected to mention exactly when it'll launch the new series of parts. Intel's new CPU+GPU technology; dies shown to scale. The two refreshes, when they drop, will significantly overhaul Intel's current series of server chips. At present, Intel's offerings are a mixture of 45nm Nehalem and Penryn-based parts; the new 32nm Westmere chips... Read more...
Back when Intel reported its third quarter results for 2009, analysts expressed some concern that the company's strong numbers might not be fully supported by later market analysis. Research firm IDC has recently released data indicating that such concerns were unnecessary—sales in Q3 were up dramatically compared to earlier this year and stronger than is seasonally typical. Sales in Q3 were up 23 percent over Q2, while PC processor revenue grew by 14 percent quarter-on-quarter. Intel was the primary beneficiary of the growth, with an estimated 81.1 percent of world PC processor sales, while AMD took second place at 18.7 percent (down two percent) and VIA held 0.2 percent. IDC broke out numbers... Read more...
At a time when economists and TV pundits are still more likely to characterise the economy as "coasting along the bottom" rather than "recovering," Intel's Q3 results have rocketed past the predictions of even the most optimistic Wall Street analysts. The company's Q4 predictions are similarly rosy—if there's ever been a time when it's been good to be king, the company clearly feels it's now. The very strength of Santa Clara's announcement fueled analyst worries that meteoric results in Q3 could quickly fall to earth in Q4, a worry Intel has been quick to assuade. First, let's do the numbers. For the third quarter of 2009, Intel reported total revenue of $9.4 billion (up $1.4 billion from Q2)... Read more...
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