Items tagged with (krx:000660)

High bandwidth memory (HBM) has always lived up to its name, it just has not been as widely adopted in mainstream graphics cards as GDDR memory chips. Maybe that will change when HBM3 arrives. Regardless, whatever products do end up getting the HBM3 treatment will see a big jump in bandwidth, according to some figures shared by South Korean memory make SK Hynix. What's interesting is that SK Hynix is not even aggressively pushing the promise of HBM3 memory just yet. The bandwidth claim was mentioned as an aside, on a page dedicated to extolling the benefits of the company's HBM2E memory solution, which it is claims is the industry's fastest memory at 3.6Gbps and can process 460GB of data per... Read more...
SK Hynix suddenly finds itself in the midst of damage control (both literally and figuratively) over a batch of defective DRAM products that shipped out to customers. In a statement on the matter, the South Korean chip maker confirmed that some faulty DRAM left the factory, but says early reports of the number of affected DRAM wafers are "absolutely not true." It's still not clear exactly how many DRAM wafers were found to be defective. Rumor had it that SK Hynix shipped out around 240,000 defective DRAM wafers to clients, presumably for a range of products that use its memory (graphics cards, PC RAM modules, smartphones like the ASUS ROG Phone 5, and so forth). But according to SK Hynix, that... Read more...
The future of high-end graphics cards might still belong to high bandwidth memory (HBM) technologies such as HBM2 and HBM3, but do not count out good old fashioned graphics double data rate (GDDR) DRAM. SK Hynix has not—the memory chip maker today announced what it claims is the world's fastest 20-nanometer class 8-gigabit (Gb) GDDR6 DRAM for upcoming high-performance graphics cards. GDDR6 is a next-generation graphics memory solution that Hynix expects to quickly supplant both GDDR5 and GDDR5X, at least among faster graphics card solutions. The 8Gb part announced today operates with an I/O data rate of 16 gigabits per second (Gbps) per pin, which is a DRAM industry record. According to Hynix,... Read more...
Memory chip maker Hynix continues to make impressive (and fast) strides in the field of NAND flash memory. Having launched 36-layer 128-gigabit (Gb) three-dimensional (3D) NAND flash chips in April 2016 followed by mass production of 48-layer 256Gb 3D NAND chips just seven months later, the company is now touting the industry's first 72-layer 256Gb 3D NAND flash chips. Hynix is using its own technologies to build these new NAND flash chips, which are based on triple-level cell (TLC) memory. TLC NAND chips are typically found in budget oriented solid state drives (SSDs) as they're less expensive than their multi-level cell (MLC) counterparts, but reliability and performance are not on the same... Read more...