Items tagged with Ivy Bridge

Intel continues to flog the ultrabook concept for all its worth, but DigiTimes reports that thus far, sales aren't in line with what OEMs expected. Shipments from Acer and Asus are currently expected to reach 100,000 units each by the end of the year, far short of the initial target of 200-300K units apiece. Part of the problem is reputed to be price—the Taiwanese models currently open at ~$1200, and the cheaper US $1000 option isn't available The report claims that lackluster specs and economic uncertainty have further dampened customer interest, while OEMs are leery of ramping production while demand remains uncertain. None of that is stopping Intel, which currently predicts ultrabooks... Read more...
Intel's Ivy Bridge platform isn't on the market yet, but that hasn't stopped top tier motherboard makers from jumping the gun and announcing next-generation silicon promising support for the upcoming CPUs, as well as PCI Express 3.0 compliance. Now you can add Asus' name to the mix after it went and unveiled three Z68-based boards with PCI-E 3.0 connectivity. Starting at the top end and working our way down, the new boards include the P8Z68 Deluxe/Gen3, P8Z68-V Pro/Gen3, and P8Z68-V/Gen3. All three socket LGA1155 motherboards support up to 32GB of DDR3-2200 memory and are built using a 16-phase power design (12-phase for the CPU, 4-phase for the GPU). The top-end Deluxe variant comes with dual-GbE... Read more...
The second day of IDF began with Mooly Eden, Intel VP and General Manager of the PC Client Group, and his keynote discussion, detailing the current state of the company’s business and Ultrabook plans. Eden also spoke of the adaptability of the PC and the many transformations it has made over the years to meet market demand and dictate new usage models and experiences. From Ivy Bridge DX11 performance to new power saving LCD technologies, Intel's new Identity Theft Protection suite, Haswell demos and Thunderbolt IO for PCs, Mooly covered a lot of ground as usual.... Read more...
As is traditionally the case, Intel’s CEO Paul Otellini opened up the Intel Developer’s Forum with a keynote address in the theater at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The focus of Otellini’s talk was the “future of computing” and how Intel plans to capitalize on current trends and growth in the mobile device market. Otellini’s opinion is that we are still in the early stages in this evolution of computing and moving forward, no one device will be at the center of the computing experience.  But of course, Intel plans to capitalize on all of them.           To power all of the different devices, whether they be... Read more...
AMD and Intel are both preparing to launch new CPU architectures between now and the end of the year, but rumors have surfaced that suggest the two companies may delay their product introductions, albeit for different reasons. Taiwanese site DigiTimes refers to various unnamed "PC Players" who have apparently reported that Intel may push back the introduction of its Ivy Bridge processors from the end of 2011 to late Q1/early Q2 2012. Ivy Bridge is a 'tick' in Intel's tick/tock model; the 22nm die shrink of Sandy Bridge that's scheduled to incorporate an improved DX11-capable graphics core, support for PCI-Express 3.0, and will incorporate Intel's Tri-Gate 3D transistor technology. The article... Read more...
Intel has been working with its OEM partners to ensure that ultrabooks arrive below the Macbook Air's $999 price point, but DigiTimes reports that the company has drawn a line when it comes to CPU pricing. Faced with calls to cut the price of Ultrabook CPUs by 50 percent, Intel has instead given notice that it will offer 20 percent discounts to first-tier notebook vendors. Grumpy OEMs (presumably the ones who don't qualify for discounts) have pointed out that Intel's high CPU prices are the major cost behind a number of products, including those based on Oak Trail (an Oak Trail platform costs an estimated $95, compared to ~$20 for Nvidia's Tegra 2).  The comparison isn't a particularly good... Read more...
Multiple bits of CPU data have crept out from under the woodwork in the last few days; here's a roundup of what's making the rounds. On the AMD side of the equation comes a rumor that the company is about to stop producing Phenom II X2 and X4 processors in favor of moving consumers along to the Fusion-based A8 hardware. Currently, the two APU's in stock at NewEgg--the A8-3650 (2.6GHz, $119) and the A8-3850 (2.9GHz, $139) offer significantly slower CPU cores than the Phenom II X4 955 BE (3.2GHz, $119) and Phenom II X4 965 BE (3.4GHz, $134) they'd replace. TechEye, which relayed the rumor from Kitguru, claims that: "So far no one can think of a reason to restart the X2 and X4s" and implies AMD... Read more...
AMD's Llano has now debuted in both mobile and desktop flavors to generally strong approval. While CPU performance significantly lags Intel's, Llano's GPU (officially labeled as the Radeon HD 6550D) steamrolls Intel's integrated Sandy Bridge in virtually every gaming benchmark. The two chips take a markedly different approach to CPU/GPU communication; said differences have a very real impact on performance results. Over at Real World Technologies, David Kanter has compared and contrasted the differences in how Sandy Bridge and Llano manage CPU/GPU intercommunication. As he writes: "The most novel and interesting part of Llano is not the CPU or the GPU. Both of those components were re-used, specifically... Read more...
AMD has revised its purchase agreement with Global Foundries in a move that will allow the CPU design firm to recognize a $492 million non-cash gain in Q1. Instead of purchasing 45nm and 32nm wafers on a "cost-plus" basis, Sunnyvale will pay GlobalFoundries a fixed price for products through the end of the year. Reactions to the change have been mixed. The fixed-price model allows AMD to only pay for viable 32nm parts, but raises questions about GlobalFoundries' 32nm yields. AMD's ownership stake in GF has fallen considerably in the past two years, but GloFo remains Sunnyvale's premier foundry partner by a sizeable margin. According to the company's presentation, the original wafer purchase agreements... Read more...
Both TSMC and GlobalFoundries have released new information on their respective plans for the next few years. TSMC has announced its intention to double its 2011 R&D capital expenditure to $700 million, while it simultaneously spends $7.8B over the next year in order to increase its manufacturing capacity by approximately 20 percent. This is presumedly over and above what the company has spent thus far on constructing its new "gigafab" foundry, Fab 15. TSMC began work on Fab 15 last summer, but the plant isn't scheduled to come online until 2012; TSMC is most likely building out capacity at an already established plant. TSMC's production growth over the past few years. Information provided... Read more...
Today was AMD's Analyst Day and the CPU manufacturer was anxious to show its execution triumphs and discuss future plans through 2011. One of the most important announcements concerns AMD's Brazos platform, which will debut running both Ontario and Zecate processors. As of today, the first Brazos shipments have begun, with products on store shelves as early as January. We've discussed Ontario and Zecate quite a bit in previous articles; these are both 40nm parts built by TSMC with an integrated CPU. While they aren't direct competition for Atom, they'll be slugging it out in a very similar space. The slide above illustrates how AMD wants to change the current integrated GPU paradigm. In current... Read more...
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