Items tagged with Internet Explorer

If you've noticed that Internet Explorer seems to be a little (or a lot) slower as of late, it's not you. Well, it could be; try clearing your cache, make sure no nefarious add-ons slipped through, and scan for viruses. Assuming everything checks out, the issue could related to a pair of security updates that, over time, bog IE down. The good news here is Microsoft made relief just a few clicks away in the form for a hotfix. "After you apply the MS14-037 or MS14-051 cumulative security update for Internet Explorer, web applications that implement consecutive modal dialog boxes may cause Internet Explorer to become slow and unresponsive over time. This issue occurs in Internet Explorer versions... Read more...
During an "Ask Me Anything" chat session at Reddit yesterday, Internet Explorer's developers took to answering a bunch of questions from their adoring fans. Well - "adoring" might not be the best word. Judging by the thread's title, "We build Internet Explorer. I know, right?", it's almost like the developers knew that a can of worms was about to be opened. While the Reddit thread contained its expected share of haters and trolls, a couple of great questions were asked, such as the one from user asianorange, "How you ever consider rebranding and changing the name of Internet Explorer?" The response might strike some as a little surprising: "It's been suggested internally; I remember a particularly... Read more...
In case you missed it, Microsoft recently announced that its Internet Explorer browser will begin blocking out-of-date ActiveX controls starting September 9, 2014. This was originally supposed to go into effect tomorrow (August 12), though Microsoft decided to push things back a month to clear up customer confusion, and to give IT departments additional time to prepare. Microsoft wants to create a more secure browser, and since ActiveX controls are a popular means of entry for malware, blocking outdated ones altogether seems to be the safest bet in Redmond's mind. That might not be the case if ActiveX controls were regularly updated, but that doesn't always happen, making out-of-date ActiveX... Read more...
It's been a mini-roller coaster ride for Google's Chrome browser, which flirted with surpassing the 20 percent market share threshold around this time two years ago. Fast forward to today and Chrome has finally managed to leap over the hurdle, landing at 20.37 percent to close out the month of July, according to the latest data from Net Applications. That's enough to maintain a second place finish ahead of Mozilla's Firefox browser, which has been on a slow and steady decline for more than a year. The last time Firefox enjoyed a 20 percent share of the market was in May of 2013 -- it now sits at 15.08 percent, down from 15.54 percent in June and 16.81 percent in May. Source: Net Applications... Read more...
There's a right way to do things and a wrong way to do things, and while sometimes there exists a gray area, offering to pay bloggers for positives reviews of a product or service falls on the wrong side, plain and simple. That said, Microsoft needs to be a little more careful in which marketing firms it hires, because one of them made the mistake of mass mailing bloggers an email offering to compensate them for writing sponsored posts about Internet Explorer and splashing links across their social channels. "In this program, we are looking to spread the word about the new Internet Explorer web experience in a cool, visual way, which is where you come in!," the letter reads. "Internet Explorer... Read more...
Rather than wait around another couple of weeks until this month's scheduled Patch Tuesday to address a security flaw in virtually all versions of its Internet Explorer browser, Microsoft decided the situation was serious enough to warrant an out-of-band security update. The fix has been fully tested and is ready to deploy on affected versions of the browser, which span from from IE6 and later. "The majority of customers have automatic updates enabled and will not need to take any action because protections will be downloaded and installed automatically. If you’re unsure if you have automatic updates, or you haven’t enabled Automatic Update, now is the time," Microsoft stated in a... Read more...
If you haven't already, you should consider dropping Internet Explorer and using a browser like Chrome or Firefox, at least until Microsoft rolls out a fix for a zero day vulnerability that reportedly affects nearly every version of IE. Worse yet, if you're still stubbornly rocking Windows XP for whatever reason, this is potentially a permanent vulnerability -- Microsoft dropped support for the legacy operating system earlier this month. The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) is one of several governments that suggests employing an alternate browser. "US-CERT is aware of active exploitation of a use-after-free vulnerability in Microsoft Internet Explorer. This vulnerability... Read more...
Microsoft is scrambling to fix a security flaw in its Internet Explorer (IE) browser that could allow a hacker to remotely execute malicious code if users visit an infected website. Unfortunately, the security bug is present on just about every version of IE, and if you're a Windows XP user, be advised that no security fix is coming your way now that you're using an unsupported operating system. There have already been what Microsoft claims are "limited, targeted attacks." What's most often the case is that hackers taking advantage of the exploit for nefarious purposes will try to convince a user to click on a link in an email or instant message directing them to the malicious website. "Our initial... Read more...
This shouldn't come as a complete shock to anyone who's been around the online block a time or two, but no web browser is 100 percent secure. That much was once again proven at the annual Pwn2Own hacking event held at the CanSecWest security conference. By the second day of the event, every major browser had fallen -- Firefox (Mozilla), Chrome (Google), Internet Explorer (Microsoft), and Safari (Apple). Not all browsers are created equal, however, and out of the bunch, Firefox had the unwanted distinction of being the most exploited. Security researchers participating in the event were able to exploit vulnerabilities in Firefox three separate times on the first day of the event, plus one more... Read more...
The presence of a zero day security flaw in Internet Explorer 10 and Internet Explorer 9 has caught the attention of Microsoft, which decided to release a temporary patch rather than let it loom until next month's Patch Tuesday. According to Microsoft, the vulnerability doesn't exist in Internet Explorer 11, nor does it affect IE versions prior to 9. "The vulnerability is a remote code execution vulnerability. The vulnerability exists in the way that Internet Explorer accesses an object in memory that has been deleted or has not been properly allocated," Microsoft explained in a security advisory. "The vulnerability may corrupt memory in a way that could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary... Read more...
As much as Microsoft would prefer that you upgrade to Windows 8, it can’t ignore the legions of Windows 7 users who aren’t budging. Today, it officially released Internet Explorer 11 for Windows 7, bringing IE 11’s speed and (most of its) functionality to the aging OS. See what you’ve been missing by downloading it here. Want to get a feel for what 11 is like? Check out EtchMark on Microsoft's test drive site. Say what you will about past iterations of Internet Explorer, but critics have largely agreed that IE 11 is a big improvement in Microsoft’s browser. The latest version is much faster and supports WebGL and apps. Support for touch is missing, which isn’t... Read more...
Another month is in the books, thereby giving us another opportunity to examine the state of the browser wars as summer winds down and the back-to-school season comes within sight. The story that unfolds when looking at browser statistics depends on which research firm's numbers you examine, as Net Market Share and StatCounter paint very different pictures of the browser market. Starting with the former, Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser still dominates the competition with a commanding 56.61 percent share of the desktop browser market, up from 56.15 percent in June. Year-on-year, IE has increased its share by 2.68 percentage points. document.getElementById("na635112116175676391").src="https://www.netmarketshare.com/report.aspx?qprid=1"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"qpcustomb=0"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"qpsp=162"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"qpnp=13"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"qptimeframe=M"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"qpf=16"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"qpwidth=600"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"qpdisplay=1011"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"qpmr=10"+String.fromCharCode(38)+"site="+window.location.hostname... Read more...
Microsoft's Internet Explorer has a huge advantage in the browser wars because it ships with every copy of Windows, which is why the European Union forced the software maker to offer a so-called browser ballot on new Windows PCs. What's interesting, however, is that even though IE is usually the default option on most workplace computers, the influx of alternative devices such as smartphones and tablets is leading to more browser diversity, according to recent research by Forrester. According to Forrester, IE claims a 40.2 percent share of the browser market, trumping Google Chrome at 27.8 percent and Mozilla Firefox at 25.4 percent, VentureBeat reports. Apple's Safari browser trails far behind... Read more...
Staunch Chrome and Firefox users aren't going to like this statement, but Internet Explorer has won the browser war, or so it seems. It wasn't always a foregone conclusion that IE would win. After the demise of Netscape, Firefox emerged as the first legitimate threat to IE's throne, and then Chrome came along and started gaining market share as if destined to finish the job. Now nearly five years later (from Chrome's debut), browser shares seemed to have plateaued. According to tracking information provided by NetMarketShare, IE commands a 55.83 percent share of the browser market, followed by Firefox at 20.21 percent and Chrome at 16.45 percent. If we dig deeper, we see that the end of March... Read more...
As we covered just yesterday, a leaked build of Microsoft's upcoming Windows Blue (aka: Windows "8.1") is floating around the net "somewhere", and as it appears, there's quite a bit that has changed. No, we didn't get rid of the Start screen, but many further enhancements have been added, along with other niceties around the OS. Neowin wasted no time in exploring the latest build, and in doing so discovered a subtle but extremely notable tweak that Microsoft has conducted with Internet Explorer 11. It's no secret to anyone by this point that coding a website to support older IE versions is a pain - even Microsoft itself acknowledges this. However, things still are not perfect, and for that reason,... Read more...
In the Web browser world, WebKit is a force to be reckoned with. It began life as a couple of KDE libraries (KHTML and KJS), but was then forked and further developed by a bevvy of companies including Apple, Nokia, Google and RIM. While KHTML's initial focus was to support the popular Linux Web browser Konquerer, the fork, which then became known as WebKit, was cross-platform - Mac, Linux, Windows and even mobile. Suffice to say, WebKit has proven to be one of the most successful software forks ever created. Today, WebKit is used by a great number of browsers, with Google Chrome and Apple Safari leading the pack. Other browsers backed by the Web engine include those bundled with BlackBerry devices,... Read more...
Microsoft is currently investigating reports of a zero day bug affecting Internet Explorer 6, Internet Explorer 7, and Internet Explorer 8, the company announced in a Security Advisory. At issue is a remote code execution vulnerability that would allow attackers to seize control of a Windows PC. How it works is IE attempts to reference and use an object that had previously been freed. The components of an exploit for such a vulnerability are typically: Javascript to trigger the Internet Explorer vulnerability Heap spray or similar memory preparation to ensure the memory being accessed after it has been freed is useful A way around the ASLR platform-level mitigation A way around the DEP platform-level... Read more...
Another month is in the books, and once again, Internet Explorer is the browser to beat, in terms of market share. IE closed out October with a majority share of 54.13 percent, well ahead of Firefox at 19.99 percent and Chrome at 18.55 percent, but a closer look at the numbers reveals some interesting trends. For one, IE increased its install base for the second consecutive month, and is up by exactly 1.5 percentage points compared to October 2011. So not only is IE still on top, but it's managed to climb higher since a year ago. That's bad news for Firefox, which dropped below 20 percent for the first time in several years, and declined 2.53 percent compared to a year ago. Chrome isn't faring... Read more...
Still clinging to Internet Explorer? If so, be aware of a recently posted security advisory (2757760) alerting IE users of a vulnerability that could allow attackers to execute malicious code from a remote location. According to Microsoft, the the vulnerability affects affects IE6, IE7, IE8, and IE9 (IE10 is excluded). "A remote code execution vulnerability exists in the way that Internet Explorer accesses an object that has been deleted or has not been properly allocated," Microsoft explains. "The vulnerability may corrupt memory in a way that could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code in the context of the current user within Internet Explorer. An attacker could host a specially crafted... Read more...
If you have a hard time picturing what your childhood would have been like without blasting asteroids to smithereens or battling your friends in Pong, you’re in for a treat. If you have no idea what we’re talking about, you’re still in for a lot of fun, thanks to Atari. The venerable game maker is partnering with Internet Explorer to launch Atari Arcade, complete with a ton of Atari’s best-loved games. Atari’s 40-year anniversary and Internet Explorer’s upcoming version 10 are the reasons for the new, HTML5-based online game platform. Multiple browsers are supported, but Internet Explorer gets the ad-free version. Microsoft is using the platform to showcase... Read more...
Another month is in the books, and as usual, Internet Explorer remains the most used browser on the planet with a 54.02 percent share of the market, according to NetMarketShare. That's down only slightly from one month prior, when IE's share totaled 54.05 percent. After sliding consistently for the past couple of years, when IE's share was above 60 percent, Microsoft's browser seems destined to cling to more than half of the market. The lowest it's been in in the past year is 51.87 percent, and that was back in December 2011. Once 2012 rolled around, IE began to climb at a slow but steady pace to a high of 54.09 percent in April of this year. Google's Chrome browser, meanwhile, declined for only... Read more...
Something strange is happening the world of browsers. It wasn't all that long ago when it was conceivable to think that Internet Explorer would no longer be the most used browser on the planet in 2012, and certainly not by the second quarter. But lo and behold, not only is IE in command of the browser wars with a majority share of the market, but it's been increasing its usage numbers in recent months. According to Net Applications, Internet Explorer inched above 54 percent by the end of April 2012 (54.09 percent, to be exact), up from 53.83 percent in March and 52.84 percent in Europe. Over the long haul, IE's market share numbers are down, but it's anything but a free fall. In April of last... Read more...
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