Items tagged with Internet Explorer

It seemed inevitable, but last week, we received confirmation that Microsoft would in fact be killing off Internet Explorer at some point. The death won't happen with Windows 10, however, as the browser is still relied-upon in the enterprise market. Given that, we might not even see it be retired in Windows 11 -- the enterprise world can move at a snail's pace when it comes to software upgrades. Regardless of all that, what's been certain for a while is that Project Spartan would become the primary browser in Windows 10, sporting a brand-new Trident engine fork called EdgeHTML. While it was once believed that both browsers in Windows 10 would bundle in both the EdgeHTML and IE-based Trident... Read more...
It's always fun to see which security flaws get exploited at Pwn2Own, and this year's event has proven to be no exception. In fact, it could be considered to be one of the most exciting events to date, with JungHoon Lee exploiting three major browsers, and securing a record $110,000 payout for one of the flaws. Starting the day off, JungHoon (aka: lokihardt) breached a time-of-check to time-of-use vulnerability in the 64-bit version of Internet Explorer, breaking out of the sandbox via a privileged JavaScript injection, allowing him to execute medium-integrity code. This flaw netted JungHoon $65,000. His second proof-of-concept was the big one, worth $110,000. It affects both the stable and beta... Read more...
You can't look back and examine the history of Windows without also taking into account Internet Explorer, the browser that first debuted as a part of the "Plus! for Windows 95" add-on package nearly 20 years ago. By some counts, it's still the most used browser today, though beginning with Windows 10, Microsoft will introduce Windows users to a brand new browser.We've already seen IE's successor in action under its codename Project Spartan. It's not yet finished, nor will Project Spartan be the final name when Windows 10 ships to consumers later this year -- Microsoft is still trying to figure out what to call it.Internet Explorer prepares to walk the plank."We're now researching what the new... Read more...
There's been a lot of talk about Project Spartan, the new browser that will replace Internet Explorer in Windows 10. That's also true for the version of Windows 10 that runs on smartphones, and for the first time, Microsoft is providing a glimpse of how Project Spartan's rendering engine (also called Project Spartan) runs on mobile handsets. It's available in the Windows 10 Technical Preview for phones. As currently implemented, the Project Spartan rendering engine is baked into Internet Explorer -- Microsoft is saving a full-fledged browser replacement for a later preview. Essentially what that means is you can test drive the new rendering engine, just in a different... Read more...
When we reported on the release of Microsoft's latest preview build last week, we mentioned that while Cortana made an entrance, the much-anticipated Spartan browser did not. But little did we realize that some of Spartan made the cut, in the form of an experimental rendering engine hidden under IE's hood. As we learned in late December, Microsoft has separated its Trident engine into two separate versions: one is for Spartan, now called EdgeHTML, while the other remains with Internet Explorer. The reason Microsoft doesn't simply forego the lesser version is due to compatibility, which is hugely important in the enterprise sector. If you're running the Windows 10 9926 build, chances... Read more...
After having its name besmirched following the release of Windows Vista, Microsoft hit it out of the park with its follow-up: Windows 7. Microsoft then developed Windows 8 to appease two distinct markets — PCs and tablets — with one operating system, resulting in significant backlash from critics and consumers. Microsoft hopes to distance itself from Windows 8.x not just in name (notice how they skipped Windows 9), but by also ensuring that PC users are not left in the cold to accommodate tablet users (and vice versa). Windows 10 will bring with it a wealth of new functionality to users, including the lightweight ‘Spartan’ Internet browser that we first told you about in late December. Spartan... Read more...
The next version of Internet Explorer might look more like the competition rather than a retooled version of itself. Scheduled to debut in Windows 9 (codenamed Threshold), Internet Explorer 12 (IE12) is said to look like a "cross between Chrome and Firefox" as part of a massive overhaul to the user interface that will give it a flatter appearance. According to Neowin, the tabs for each page are rectangles at the top and start at the left of the Windows, similar to both Chrome and Firefox. They also appear above the URL bar, unlike in Internet Explorer 11, in which tabs populate the area to the right of the URL bar. "It really looks a lot like Chrome but with Microsoft's flat lipstick applied,"... Read more...
Last month, we covered a new research project from Microsoft, dubbed Project DeLorean, that seeks to dramatically improve the subjective experience of cloud gaming by cutting perceived latency between the player and the server. Today, in a potentially related announcement, comes news that Microsoft is also working on a system that would allow games to stream at 60 fps directly in-browser. The two projects, which are almost certainly related, would supposedly allow for in-browser play of both Xbox 360 and Xbox One games at up to 60 FPS with the "full" Xbox 360 experience -- meaning that the Xbox 360 dashboard would also run in-browser. According to the Neowin report, the project has Xbox branding... Read more...
If you've noticed that Internet Explorer seems to be a little (or a lot) slower as of late, it's not you. Well, it could be; try clearing your cache, make sure no nefarious add-ons slipped through, and scan for viruses. Assuming everything checks out, the issue could related to a pair of security updates that, over time, bog IE down. The good news here is Microsoft made relief just a few clicks away in the form for a hotfix. "After you apply the MS14-037 or MS14-051 cumulative security update for Internet Explorer, web applications that implement consecutive modal dialog boxes may cause Internet Explorer to become slow and unresponsive over time. This issue occurs in Internet Explorer versions... Read more...
During an "Ask Me Anything" chat session at Reddit yesterday, Internet Explorer's developers took to answering a bunch of questions from their adoring fans. Well - "adoring" might not be the best word. Judging by the thread's title, "We build Internet Explorer. I know, right?", it's almost like the developers knew that a can of worms was about to be opened. While the Reddit thread contained its expected share of haters and trolls, a couple of great questions were asked, such as the one from user asianorange, "How you ever consider rebranding and changing the name of Internet Explorer?" The response might strike some as a little surprising: "It's been suggested internally; I remember a particularly... Read more...
In case you missed it, Microsoft recently announced that its Internet Explorer browser will begin blocking out-of-date ActiveX controls starting September 9, 2014. This was originally supposed to go into effect tomorrow (August 12), though Microsoft decided to push things back a month to clear up customer confusion, and to give IT departments additional time to prepare. Microsoft wants to create a more secure browser, and since ActiveX controls are a popular means of entry for malware, blocking outdated ones altogether seems to be the safest bet in Redmond's mind. That might not be the case if ActiveX controls were regularly updated, but that doesn't always happen, making out-of-date ActiveX... Read more...
It's been a mini-roller coaster ride for Google's Chrome browser, which flirted with surpassing the 20 percent market share threshold around this time two years ago. Fast forward to today and Chrome has finally managed to leap over the hurdle, landing at 20.37 percent to close out the month of July, according to the latest data from Net Applications. That's enough to maintain a second place finish ahead of Mozilla's Firefox browser, which has been on a slow and steady decline for more than a year. The last time Firefox enjoyed a 20 percent share of the market was in May of 2013 -- it now sits at 15.08 percent, down from 15.54 percent in June and 16.81 percent in May. Source: Net Applications... Read more...
There's a right way to do things and a wrong way to do things, and while sometimes there exists a gray area, offering to pay bloggers for positives reviews of a product or service falls on the wrong side, plain and simple. That said, Microsoft needs to be a little more careful in which marketing firms it hires, because one of them made the mistake of mass mailing bloggers an email offering to compensate them for writing sponsored posts about Internet Explorer and splashing links across their social channels. "In this program, we are looking to spread the word about the new Internet Explorer web experience in a cool, visual way, which is where you come in!," the letter reads. "Internet Explorer... Read more...
Rather than wait around another couple of weeks until this month's scheduled Patch Tuesday to address a security flaw in virtually all versions of its Internet Explorer browser, Microsoft decided the situation was serious enough to warrant an out-of-band security update. The fix has been fully tested and is ready to deploy on affected versions of the browser, which span from from IE6 and later. "The majority of customers have automatic updates enabled and will not need to take any action because protections will be downloaded and installed automatically. If you’re unsure if you have automatic updates, or you haven’t enabled Automatic Update, now is the time," Microsoft stated in a... Read more...
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