Items tagged with iFixIt

Who doesn’t love a good gadget teardown? Luckily, we have the folks over a iFixit to do all the dirty work by unscrewing and ungluing all of the latest gadget so that we can see what makes them tick inside. Today, the teardown crew set their sights on the LG G5, and thankfully, the device scores high on the repairability scale. For starters the G5 makes use of LM201 aluminum alloy, which is a step up from the polycarbonate exterior that has been employed by its predecessor. And the modular nature of the G5 presents itself right away, as a simple press of a button on the side of the phone deploys the modular bay which holds the removable battery. With most OEMs switching to integrated batteries,... Read more...
Apple's been on a mission to shrink its mobile products for consumers who prefer smaller size gadgets, hence the recent releases of the iPhone SE and 9.7-inch iPad Pro. The folks at iFixIt already took the liberty of gutting the former, and now it's the latter that's fallen on the teardown site's operating table. Folks, don't try this at home.No, seriously don't try tearing into a 9.7-inch iPad Pro, there's a good chance something will go wrong. In stark contrast to the iPhone SE, which surprisingly turned out to be somewhat easy to open up and repair (for an Apple product), the newest iPad Pro makes it clear that you're not supposed to be disassembling this thing.As Apple often likes to do,... Read more...
Even though some may cringe at the thought of the highly anticipated, $600 Oculus Rift being dissected instead of enjoyed, you have to hand it to the folks over at iFixit for giving this season’s hottest tech gadget the teardown treatment. Today, we’re give some insight into how relatively easy it is to repair the device should you manage to drop it during dizzying gaming matches and would rather take your chances with a a screwdriver and a spudger than send it off for repair. Getting inside the Rift is surprisingly easy, starting with the thick foam frame that sits against your face. It’s held in place with clips instead of screws, which aids in the quick removal process. With the padding out... Read more...
Despite its rugged exterior designed to protect it from the unforgiving clumsiness of grade school kids, the ASUS Chromebook C202 is surprisingly easy to operate on and repair at home. That's the takeaway from iFixIt's latest teardown, which noted that "opening the C202 was easier than sticking a straw in a juice box." Presumably they're talking about an actual juice box and not a Capri Sun, the latter of which is the bane of any thirsty child looking for a quick hit.The Chromebook C202's friendly serviceability isn't by accident. ASUS intentionally designed the C202 to be both "classroom-rugged" and easy to disassemble and repair, should the need arise. Both are touted as features of the C202,... Read more...
There's always that one kid who instead of playing with his toys, he takes them apart to see what makes them tick. He's the neighbor who turned his Rubik's Cube into a pile of squares, straightened out his Slinky, and disassembled his Voltron (fist bump if you get any of those references, your childhood rocked). And now? Those types of curious characters post teardown evaluations of pricey gadgets, perhaps none better than the brave folks at iFixIt, who just tore into Samsung's new Galaxy S7 handset.Android fans hold Samsung's Galaxy phones in high regard, and with good reason—they typically blend high-end hardware with desirable features, and starting with the Galaxy S6 series, premium construction... Read more...
As we can attest, it's important to maintain relationships in the tech media industry, otherwise it's a lonely and difficult road. That doesn't mean giving companies special treatment, but it does entail respecting things like non disclosure agreements (NDAs). The folks at iFixIt didn't do that with regards to the recently announced fourth generation Apple TV box and now they're paying the price. What happened is iFixIt secured an Apple TV dev kit, which is a pre-release model intended to give developers a chance to build and test their apps on the new model before it becomes publicly available. iFixIt then proceeded to disassemble the set-top box and post a teardown analysis on its blog. Cool... Read more...
The steady handed tech surgeons at iFixIt wasted no time getting their mitts on an iPhone 6s Plus model and gutting it like a Halloween pumpkin. Along with the non-Plus version, Apple released its new flagship iPhone models to retail today and the big question everyone wants to know is, will it blend? Second to our morbid curiosity of what happens to electronics when they're shoved into a high power blender is the level of difficulty involved when attempting a do-it-yourself (DIY) repair. In the case of the iPhone 6s Plus, tearing into the device to replace the battery or other parts is an attainable goal. Opening the iPhone 6s Plus is rather easy if you have the right tool. Unfortunately Apple... Read more...
If there's ever a shortage of glue, you can be pretty sure that Apple is partially to blame. When it comes to Apple products, teardown after teardown reveals that the glue-happy company isn't afraid to lather its mobile products with adhesive. We saw it recently with the iPad Air 2, and here again with the recently released iPad mini 3. It took the experienced folks at iFixIt half an hour just to pry their way through the glue that holds the glass digitizer assembly in place. "The iPad Mini continues Apple's repair-impeding practice of keeping iPads together with copious amounts of adhesive. This is one area in which the friendly-to-open Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire HD are clear winners," iFixIt notes.... Read more...
If a part goes bad in your PC, you whip off the side panel door, yank out the defective component, and replace it with a working one. But should something inside your tablet give up the ghost, you better cross your fingers it's still under warranty, because in most cases, do-it-yourself (DIY) is going to be difficult. That's true of many slates, including Apple's recently launched iPad Air 2., iFixIt's teardown analysis reveals. Taking center stage on the teardown table this time around is the gold colored iPad Air 2 (gold is best!). Like previous versions of Apple's popular tablet, the iPad Air 2 isn't held together by any screws, not even proprietary ones. Instead, the chassis is glued shut,... Read more...
Apple has a history of trying to prevent owners of its products from mucking around inside its devices, and in case you thought the company turned over a new leaf with its Mac Mini system, think again. Though the previous model was relatively easy to service at home -- it scored an 8 out of 10 on iFixIt's teardown analysis -- the recently announced late 2014 model is an entirely different story. "Sometimes we just don't understand what goes on in hardware designers' heads. Apple took one of their most-fixable, most-upgradable products and broke it," iFixIt laments. "The design didn't change at all from the outside, so we can't blame the product designers who keep making things smaller, thinner,... Read more...
Apple made a splash during its press event earlier in the week by introducing a new 27-inch iMac model with a 5K "Retina" display. That's not a typo -- at a time when PC sales are still trending in the wrong direction, Apple decided the best way to spark renewed interest into its line of all-in-one systems was by skipping over 4K with a more pixelicious 5K panel. Resolution aside, is the refreshed iMac any easier to tear into than previous models? In a word, no. However, there are some upsides to the iMac's overall design that DIY repair folk (and upgraders) will appreciate. The folks at iFixIt got their mitts on the new AIO and gave it the teardown treatment, noting that it's still incredibly... Read more...
Samsung took a page from Apple's design portfolio when it released the Galaxy Alpha, a handset that looks like a stretched out version of the iPhone 5s, complete with metal construction. Yes, the front and back are still made of plastic, but the metal frame gives the handset a premium look and feel that's not necessarily found on other Galaxy devices. Unfortunately for DIY repair types, this new design to the Galaxy line doesn't make the device any easier to tear into than, say, the Galaxy S5. We'll start with the good news. The folks at iFixIt confirmed that it's still super easy to access the battery -- just pop the rear cover off and swap out the battery as needed. There are no tools required... Read more...
You know what they say about dudes who carry around big phones, right? Indeed, they have big batteries, too! That's especially true of Apple's recently launched iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus models, both of which are bigger than any previous iPhone model. Our friends at iFixIt felt like ending the work week by slicing into these Apple devices, so we get to see just how big the batteries are in these handsets. First things first -- these are Apple devices, after all, and that means it takes some skill and patience to get inside without ruining the hardware. Once again, Apple's preference for less common pentalobe screws is in full display, though once removed, you no longer have to work your way... Read more...
As if the whole Oculus Rift movement wasn't exciting enough, there's even more reason to like the virtual reality headset. The folks at iFixIt got their hands on the Oculus Rift Development Kit 2 and did what they do best -- they tore it apart, bit by bit, to evaluate its repairability. The verdict? An impressive 9 out of 10. Since the Oculus Rift is a still a beta product, the 9 out of 10 score is a preliminary one. That said, it scored high marks for using standard Phillips #0 screws in both the headset and positional tracker, "making it a cinch to open them." It also impressed the teardown crew for its cable management being much improved from the original development kit -- the elimination... Read more...
Amazon turned the tablet market upside down with its low cost Kindle Fire family, and now it will try to do the same thing in the smartphone sector with its recently launched Fire Phone. While that plays out, the Fire Phone has already received the teardown treatment, and lucky for Amazon, passing the test with flying colors isn't a prerequisite for big sales figures. Straight to the point, the Fire Phone isn't a handset you'll have fun trying to repair on your own if something goes wrong. The folks at iFixIt found this out by doing what they always do -- busting out their tools and disassembling the device at all costs. Things started out on a positive note thanks to the use of non-proprietary... Read more...
The LG G Watch (LG-W100) is notable for at least a couple of reasons, the first of which is that it's one of not very many smartwatches rocking Google's promising Android Wear platform. Tying into that tidbit, it also happens to be the first Android Wear device to get the full teardown treatment from the folks over at iFixIt. How did it fare? Better than most tablets and smartphones. A quick glance at the watch's underbelly reveals a set of familiar T5 screws with swift access to the guts with no adhesive getting in the away. This elicited a hearty, "Thanks, LG!," from the teardown team. Removing the strap is a bit trickier than some other smartwatches like Samsung's Gear Live and Gear 2 -- instead... Read more...
As gadgets shrink in size, it brings up the question of how feasible it is to perform repairs on your own at home. So far the answer depends on the device, as well as your level of patience and expertise. Some are a bear to repair, and others, like Samsung's Gear Fit, are a bit easier, though it's not without its challenges. The folks at iFixIt recently tore into a Gear Fit and what they discovered is that, with a little work, you can replace the battery. That's always a big plus when it comes to mobile devices, otherwise you're stuck with a hunk of unresponsive electronics once the battery gives up the ghost. There is some adhesive that keeps the Gear Fit from popping open, though it's not that... Read more...
Depending on who you ask, Samsung's Galaxy S5 is the best Android smartphone (or smartphone, period) on the planet (Apple and HTC would both object). At the very least, it's in the discussion, as it should be when you consider the spec sheet. Far less impressive, however, is how difficult the Galaxy S5 is to repair on your own. Samsung's Galaxy S5 was the latest device to receive iFixIt's teardown treatment. Things started off well enough -- removing the backplate turned out to be "easier than peeling a banana," with no tools needed, just an opposable thumb. Once removed, users have easy access to the replaceable battery, which is a huge plus in Samsung's favor (are you paying attention, Apple... Read more...
If handset makers have their way, eventually we'll all be wearing smartwatches synced up to our mobile phones. The verdict is still out on whether this type of wearable has the legs to go the distance in the consumer market, but if it does, what happens when one of these pricey gadgets breaks and is out of its warranty period? Surprisingly, the DIY (do-it-yourself) repair route might not be all that difficult. The surgical sons of guns at iFixIt cleared their operating table of the standard fare -- you know, things like smartphones and tablets -- and strapped down Samsung's Gear 2 smartwatch for a thorough teardown analysis. Given the device's relatively small size compared to other mobile devices,... Read more...
In a perfect world, you'd never need to crack open any of your electronic devices because they'd work forever, dutifully doing their job and never needing repair. Here in the real world, things break, and they have a tendency to happen once that all-important warranty period expires. What then? Well, if you're handy and feeling adventurous, you can try repairing the device yourself. The level of adventure varies by device, and when it comes to Amazon's recently announced Fire TV streaming box, the odds are pretty good you'll be able to get in there without making things worse, provided you practice a bit of patience. The folks at iFixIt stuck their hands in Amazon's Fire TV for its latest teardown... Read more...
As was expected, HTC introduced its new One (M8) handset yesterday, and judging by the media coverage and user comments, there appears to be a fair amount of excitement over the company's new flagship device. Understandable, considering it features a large 5-inch Full HD 1080p display powered by a 2.3GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 processor. And unlike the original One, the new version sports a microSD card slot. Good stuff, though if you're looking for an Achilles Heel, the folks at iFixIt have found one. Like its predecessor, the HTC One M8 isn't a repair-friendly device. Getting it open requires heating up the adhesive to soften the glue, and then prying off the speaker grill with a... Read more...
There's not a gadget in the world the folks at iFixIt can't tear into, though some are definitely easier to disassemble than others. Mobile devices like tablets and smartphones tend to be difficult to surgically operate on, and even some hybrid laptops can give users fits if there's a need to service or a replace a part. On the opposite end of the spectrum are desktop PCs and iFixIt's teardown of HP's Z820 workstation reminds us why we love this category so much. Back in December, iFixIt tore into Apple's cylindrical shaped Mac Pro, which earned an 8 out of 10 "Repairability Score" for being surprisingly modular and easy to disassemble. That's a great score, though not as stellar as the one HP's... Read more...
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