Items tagged with graphene

A team of researchers have done something pretty remarkable with graphene, and it has nothing to do with battery technology or next-generation semiconductors. Instead, they developed a graphene-based adaptive thermal camouflage film that can effectively mask hot objects, such as a human soldier, from infrared cameras that scan the surroundings and detect different heat profiles. Had this existed before, the creature in Predator would have had a much tougher time hunting his human prey. This isn't science fiction, though. The material is a thin, lightweight, and ultra-flexible film that can reconfigure its thermal appearance and blend in with the varying thermal background within a matter a seconds.... Read more...
Mobile device makers have been using lithium-ion batteries for close to three decades now, and at some point, something better will come along. Samsung hopes to be the one to introduce it. Researchers at the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) have developed a unique battery material that is capable of charging mobile devices five times faster than standard lithium-ion batteries, while also enabling a 45 percent increase in capacity. As with many promising battery technologies we have heard about over the years, this one involves graphene. Samsung's approach has been a little different, though, in that it discovered a mechanism to mass synthesize graphene into a 3D form like popcorn... Read more...
Remember when a 1TB hard drive seemed enormous? There was also a time when the idea of having even 8GB of memory in our personal computers seemed like extreme overkill. Today, that's basically the starting point for most PCs. As time goes on, and tech improves, even today's storage types and sizes are bound to seem hilariously lacking. For storage and memory companies, the challenge is to shrink dies ever smaller, or increase the amount of data that can be crammed into mechanical storage. Both methods need to continue progressing at a smooth enough rate so as to not bottleneck the other. Just as mechanical storage used to be the biggest bottleneck in our desktops, today's solutions are proving... Read more...
Three atoms thick. According to a paper published this week in the science journal Nature by a group of researchers from Cornell University, that is the breadth of the transistors that can now be produced using an experimental — and highly conductive — material called transition metal dichalcogenide (also called a TMD). We aren't talking five atoms thick, or even four (because any schmoe with a hobbyist chemistry set can do that), but transistors rendered at a thickness of just three atoms. As it applies to theoretical science and human achievement, the harnessing of TMD for practical use is quite remarkable. It is the prospective leaps that could potentially be made in technological hardware... Read more...
Graphene is a sort of super material for electronics; it’s thin, durable, light, transparent, and flexible, and Samsung says that it’s developed a way to synthesize the substance so it can speed of the commercial development of graphene and thereby usher in a new era of electronics development. Samsung noted that graphene has “one hundred times greater electron mobility than silicon” and is ideal for flexible displays and wearable computing devices. Maybe someday soon? The breakthrough came from the company’s Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) partnership with Sungkyunkwan University. “The new method developed by SAIT and Sungkyunkwan University... Read more...
Made in IBM Labs: IBM Scientists Demonstrate World's Fastest Graphene Transistor Holds Promise for Improving Performance of Transistors YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, N.Y. - 05 Feb 2010: In a just-published paper in the magazine Science, IBM (NYSE: IBM) researchers demonstrated a radio-frequency graphene transistor with the highest cut-off frequency achieved so far for any graphene device - 100 billion cycles/second (100 GigaHertz). This accomplishment is a key milestone for the Carbon Electronics for RF Applications (CERA) program funded by DARPA, in an effort to develop next-generation communication devices. The high frequency record was achieved using wafer-scale, epitaxially grown graphene using processing... Read more...
It has been predicted that existing manufacturing materials used in microchips will eventually hit a wall that no amount of R & D can overcome. As a result researchers are looking into several other technologies such as Graphene."When current silicon transistor technology goes below 10 nanometers in size, it's predicted it will run into the laws of physics and will no longer be able to create reliable transistors.??Graphene, on the other hand, is already seeing working transistors in the sub-10 nanometer range.  The researchers say their latest, unpublished work has used graphene to make transistors a single nanometer across."To understand just how amazing this is, consider the amazing amount... Read more...
Companies have been trying to find a way around Moore's Law for quite some time now, and a large part of that search involves new materials.  One such material is called Graphene, and can be made into flexible sheets only a single atom thin."Graphene is mechanical tough, flexible, transparent, and a great conductor of heat.  The new research shows that it would make an ideal double both in transistors and in interconnects, replacing silicon and copper to form ultra-high frequency circuits.  Further, it could be ideally applied to vast amount of applications including photovoltaics, lcd panels, and sensors, all of which rely on optimal conductivity/electrical behavior."Currently... Read more...