Items tagged with DHS

Nuclear bombs and electromagnetic pulses are heard about in pop culture, but is it a real threat in the modern era? A U.S Air Force base in Texas seems to think there is at least some risk and is surveying a facility to find anything vulnerable to EMP attacks.  Officials at Joint Base San Antonio in Lackland, Texas, recently issued a bid request to survey a facility called the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubrication Complex. This survey would help identify any electronics or other equipment that could be vulnerable to an EMP before a further investigation occurs. Following both the survey and deeper investigation, the Air Force would look into protecting the equipment should an EMP attack occur.... Read more...
Earlier in the week, we reported on a dangerous exploit with Windows domain controllers called Zerologon. Now, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), under the Department of Homeland Security direction, is issuing warnings about the exploit and is pushing government agencies to patch the vulnerability over the weekend. The Zerologon exploit is a way for a nefarious person to escalate privileges within a system and gain access to other systems and files. It takes advantage of the Windows Server Netlogon Remote protocol and authentication to capture session data to escalate the exploit further. Earlier in August, Microsoft released a patch to mitigate the vulnerability for... Read more...
In late December, a major power outage killed utility services for a large swathe of people in the Western Ukraine. Shortly after the incident, a number of cyber security experts pointed the finger at hackers and claimed some nefarious digital activities took down the power grid, but nothing had been officially confirmed at the time.But now the U.S Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team, or ICS-CERT, is reporting that the outage was caused by a measured cyber-attack against Ukrainian critical infrastructure.An alert published on the ICS-CERT website says, “On December 23, 2015, Ukrainian power companies experienced unscheduled power outages... Read more...
Just because an attack is bizarre doesn’t mean it isn’t dangerous. According to security researcher Brian Krebs (pictured), the FBI and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) posted a security bulletin concerning TDoS (telephony denial-of-service) attacks on PSAPs (public safety answering points). “Information received from multiple jurisdictions indicates the possibility of attacks targeting the telephone systems of public sector entities. Dozens of such attacks have targeted the administrative PSAP lines (not the 911 emergency line),” reads the bulletin in part. “The perpetrators of the attack have launched high volume of calls against the target network, tying... Read more...
This sounds like the definition of a slippery slope: According to Reuters, the U.S. government is expanding its Internet traffic-scanning cybersecurity program to include more private sector workers, such as those at large banks, utility companies, and “key transportation” companies, and the NSA will use the Department of Homeland Security as a data-gathering middleman. The DHS will send the data on to certain telecommunication companies and cybersecurity firms for processing; those groups will aggregate certain statistics and report back to the government, which should keep some sensitive data veiled from federal eyes. This screening and data collection will be used to hunt for cybersecurity... Read more...
As if you really needed one more reason to take the car, ferry or bicycle to your next destination, the Department of Homeland Security has just issued another update to its long list of search rules that'll most certainly spark up some debate. Thankfully for those with United States passports, this one probably won't have a serious impact on you, but if a foreigner is in front of you in the line to get stamped into this nation, get ready for even more possible delays.DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano recently announced new directives that clarify oversight for searches of computers and other electronic media at U.S. ports of entry. In short, this basically means that TSA officials and the like... Read more...
You may recall the case of Sebastien Boucher?  He was stopped in 2006 while crossing the U.S. - Canadian border and charged with transporting child pornography on his laptop across the border.  Unfortunately for the prosecutors, the data on the laptop is encrypted, and he now refuses to enter the necessary password to allow access to the files.  Additionally, a judge ruled late last year that he could not be compelled to reveal the password.Based on this ruling, and the recent policies enacted by the Department of Homeland Security, might we see more interest in disk encryption? A pair of DHS policies from last month say that customs agents can routinely--as a matter of course--seize,... Read more...