Items tagged with Core-M

When Intel gave us an early deep-dive look at their new 14nm Broadwell Core M series processor back in August, we were hopeful that great things would be coming to ultra-light notebooks and premium 2-in-1 tablet devices. Intel's low power 14nm Tri-Gate architecture coupled with an enhanced integrated graphics core, offered the promise of "fanless" devices as thin as tablets that could offer true notebook-class performance. Then, once we got a sneak peek at some performance numbers at IDF 2014, we came away even more impressed with Broadwell, at least in its early stages. However, without quality time spent in hands-on testing, we were left with only a view colored admittedly so often by... Read more...
While making our rounds at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, we made sure to stop by to see ASUS, and we're glad we did. The company had on display its Transformer Book T300 Chi, purportedly the world's thinnest 12.5-inch detachable 2-in-1 laptop, and also its Zenbook UX305, supposedly the slimmest 13-inch QHD+ Ultrabook the world has ever seen. In case you missed our previous coverage, the Zenbook UX305 is powered by an Intel Core M (Broadwell) processor. Intel built the 14nm Core M specifically for fanless form factors such as tablets and 2-in-1 hybrid systems. It's much smaller than Haswell, and it's a big reason why Asus can lay claim to having the thinnest 13-inch QHD+ Ultrabook... Read more...
Intel's next-generation Broadwell Y (now known as the Core M processor) is set to ship on schedule for the end of the year. The company, occasionally flagged with criticism of its repeated delays and with its IDF show ramping up next week, is sharing more detail on the upcoming hardware, features and performance characteristics of its new 14nm mobile platform.  We've previously offered up a 14nm deep-dive on how Broadwell Y came to be from a design, process and manufacturing standpoint.  Today, we'll look more closely at how the new Core M processor's feature list, how it will be productized and some high level performance expectations as well. The Core M is a dual-core processor with... Read more...
Intel's next-generation Broadwell Y (now known as the Core M processor) is set to ship on schedule for the end of the year. The company, occasionally flagged with criticism of its repeated delays and with its IDF show ramping up next week, is sharing more detail on the upcoming hardware, features and performance characteristics of its new 14nm mobile platform. We've previously offered up a 14nm deep-dive on how Broadwell Y came to be from a design, process and manufacturing standpoint. Today, we'll look more closely at how the new Core M processor's feature list, how it will be productized and some high level performance expectations as well... Intel Core M Broadwell Speeds, Feeds And Performance... Read more...
Intel's latest processor design and manufacturing effort marks a first for the semiconductor industry. No other semiconductor manufacturer in the world is building chips at the level of Intel's 14nm (nanometer) process node; even large memory manufacturers like Toshiba and Samsung are just now hitting 19nm. As we've reported previously, the processor Intel is rolling out for its first volume production vehicle at 14nm is code named "Broadwell." And, as we learned in a recent meeting at the Intel's Hillsboro, Oregon development and fab center, the first processor family based on Intel's Broadwell microarchitecture, will be known as Core M. Broadwell and the Intel Core M family is what Intel refers... Read more...
Competing with Intel's desktop or notebook processors is like taking on the proverbial 800 pound gorilla, but when it comes to resources, the company is more like an 800 pound gorilla on steroids, with advanced weaponry and a big budget.  Intel is a manufacturing and process technology juggernaut.  There was a time when the company would use that prowess to simply enable chips at higher clock speeds with larger memory resources. Since then, market demands have shifted to efficient computing, based on performance-per-watt metrics. With a strong X86 architecture in place, Intel is now using their process and manufacturing advantages to leave competitors in the rear view,... Read more...