Items tagged with Carbon footprint

Google has kept information on its energy use a secret for years, but now the search giant is going public with the details. In a couple of blog posts, Google talks about its energy approach and links to a new “The Big Picture” page where you can learn all about it. The biggest claim the company makes is that it has zero carbon footprint, which is no small feat for a tech giant like Google whose entire company is based on online tools and services. How is this possible? Google says it uses half the electricity of a typical data center, although most of those savings come from the actual facilities and not so much the servers themselves. Additionally, 30% of the energy the company... Read more...
Through a project known as Aquasar, IBM researchers are working on new technologies that could drastically reduce the power consumption and carbon footprint of data centers. Aquasar involves a water-cooled supercomputer that uses 40% less energy than comparable systems that use today's air-conditioned methods.In addition to saving energy, Aquasar takes the waste heat it pulls from servers and uses the heat to help warm nearby offices. By combining these energy savings, a company's carbon footprint can be reduced by as much as 85%. The Aquasar project began one year ago as part of IBM's First-Of-A-Kind (FOAK) program. Recently, IBM delivered its first-of-a-kind hot water-cooled supercomputer to... Read more...
ASUS Produces World's First Notebook Computer to Receive Carbon Footprint Certificate Taipei, Taiwan, October 16, 2009 – ASUS, the global IT industry leader in green innovation, today announced that its N51V notebook computer is the world's first notebook to receive both Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) and carbon footprint (PAS 2050:2008) certificates. The awarding of both certificates demonstrates ASUS' keen awareness of, and commitment to, enhancing energy savings and reducing carbon footprints—thus lessening the impact of computer manufacturing on the environment. ASUS is the first Taiwanese IT manufacturer to participate in EPEAT and to have its products registered at the Gold level.... Read more...
We knew that spam e-mails drained our time, resources, and productivity, but apparently spam is also contributing to global warming. Security-technology company, McAfee, and the technology-research company, ICF International, have just released a joint study that claims that the 62 trillion spam e-mails sent in 2008 generated approximately 33 terawatt hours (TWh) of energy per year. To put that in perspective, the study states that is the "equivalent to the electricity used in 2.4 million homes in the United States, with the same GHG [greenhouse gas] emissions as 3.1 million passenger cars using two billion United States gallons of gasoline." ICF claims that this adds up to the equivalent of... Read more...