Game Modder Mizumi Hacks Nintendo Switch To Run Gloriously Retro N64 And GameCube Games

The gang from Failoverflow guaranteed that the Nintendo Switch would be hacked to run all sorts of content not originally targeted for Nintendo's latest console, once the elite hacker group figured out how to get Linux to run on the device. That hack takes advantage of an unpatchable exploit as it turns out. And now, fans of retro GameCube games can now run some titles on their Switch using an emulator and Linux.

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The hack was shown off by a YouTube user called Mizumi using a Dolphin GameCube emulator program running on Lakka. Lakka is a Linux distribution specifically made for game consoles that happens to look a lot like the PS4 interface. The front-end for the emulator is called RetroArch. The process is similar to what you can do with running an NES Classic console on Raspberry Pi, only you obviously have much more potent hardware in the Switch. In the video, the Switch console is seen playing Super Smash Bros Melee and Paper Mario at frame rates of around 30 fps.

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While the hack is working, Mizumi notes that it is only a proof-of-concept and that some core features are missing. Those missing features include multiplayer and wireless controller support. This hack requires a lot of work to get going and some are hoping that Nintendo might see the desire for these retro games on the Switch and begin to roll out more retro titles. There are some retro games on the Switch already, including the SNK 40th anniversary game pack recently announced.

It's also worth noting that while Nintendo can’t patch the vulnerability that allows users to install Linux and pirated software on their Switch consoles, the gaming giant certainly isn't powerless. Nintendo has taken to banning Switch consoles that are running pirated software. So far, this mostly applies to pirated games downloaded from the Switch online store and Switch game cartridges that have been published online. That doesn’t mean Nintendo can’t figure out how to ban consoles that have been hacked in the future.


Via:  Techradar
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