Samsung's Galaxy F Folding Phone Allegedly Includes Secondary 4-inch Display

Samsung
2018 is quickly coming to a close, and the release of flagship Android smartphones is slowing to a crawl. With the exception of the upcoming OnePlus 6T, there aren't any other major releases on the horizon. However, Samsung has a trick up its sleeve in the form of a folding smartphone, which has been called the Galaxy F.

A new report from Bloomberg is shedding some more light on the Galaxy F including the fact that Samsung is still seemingly undecided on whether the smartphone will open vertically or horizontally. However, given that Samsung has already said that the device will be unveiled before year's end, we have doubts about that statement.

galaxy f hand

With that being said, the smartphone will likely have a portrait orientation (see the image above), meaning that it will open like flip-phones of years past. The device is said to open with a "snap", which is again throwback to smartphone that ruled the roost in the early- to mid-2000s. Bloomberg says that the folding display is "coated with a film" and won't use glass. And given that flexible display technology is still in its infancy, it will not have a fingerprint sensor embedded like the upcoming Galaxy S10 family. Instead, the fingerprint sensor will likely reside on the back of the smartphone like current Galaxy devices.

galaxy f lean

There will reportedly be a secondary 4-inch display on the outside of the Galaxy F that will be used to display information when the screen is folded closed. In prototype form, the Galaxy F weighs in 7 ounces, however, it's expected that figure may be paired down for final production. For comparison, a Galaxy Note 9 weighs 6.9 ounces.

Another interesting tidbit is that Samsung is reportedly working closely with Google on a "special version" of Android that is tailored for the folding display. Finally, while Samsung may actually unveil a prototype of the Galaxy F in the coming weeks, it might not be available to the public until Q2 2019.


Via:  Bloomberg
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