Apple To Replace MacBook Pro Screens With Defective Anti Reflective Coating

It doesn't sound like a common problem, but the latest MacBook Pro issue happens enough for Apple to begin taking action. On some recent MacBook Pros, all of which feature Retina displays, a problem could arise where the anti-reflective coating wears off, or the screen delaminates. Neither result is pretty, and if you've been unfortunate enough to encounter it, there does seem to be a bit of good news breaking here.

Reportedly, Apple is sending around an internal memo regarding a new Quality Program that will allow customers to replace their defective screens free-of-charge. In order to qualify, the notebook needs to fall within the three year mark of the original purchase date, or be claimed within one year from October 16, 2015.

Delaminated MacBook Screen

If you already ponied up the cash to fix this issue which was no fault of yours, it's noted that you may be eligible for a refund through AppleCare support. It's sure worth giving it a try, because chances are that fix wasn't cheap.

This issue has apparently been around since March, and has grown to affect thousands of customers. 6,000 of those have joined an online database called "Staingate", and ultimately, the issue has even spawned a petition.

If you have a recent MacBook Pro and don't have this issue, it's recommended that you try your best pamper it. One of the big reasons the issue arises is because of pressure built-up when the display is closed, which could likely mean that something is pressing up against the notebook. Likewise, improper cleaning agents or microfiber cloths could also lead to issues.

If your screen is not 100%, it's probably recommended that you try to get a replacement, in case the issue decides to rear its ugly head after the grace period.

Other Apple MacBook products have not exhibited this problem apparently. Check out our 12-inch MacBook review here for a look at Apple's most recent display technologies.


Via:  Mac Rumors
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