Items tagged with pirate

MediaDefender, on the of major players in the anti-piracy software industry, apparently had their source code heisted and BitTorrented to the far corners of the planet.  Who would do such a thing?Was it clever hackers using some super-secret back-door hack into MD's server(s)?   Perhaps some sort of virus disguised as an e-mail selling discount medication?   Maybe, but it seems more likely that this was an inside job:“It appears that this leak was not collected from the e-mails. The MD-Defenders themselves claim that a MD employee handed over the files to them, but this hasn’t be verified by other sources at this point.This leak contains a wealth of information and seriously harm MediaDefender’s... Read more...
A former BitTorrent server administrator has been given a harsh sentence - at least for a diehard Linux user.  Because the monitoring software required by his plea agreement won't run on Linux (surprise!), he is been ordered to switch to Windows, or go without a computer. Scott McCausland, who used to be an administrator of the EliteTorrents BitTorrent server before it was shut down by the FBI, pleaded guilty in 2006 to two copyright-related charges over the uploading of Star Wars: Episode III to the internet. As a result, he was sentenced to five months in jail and five months' home confinement. McCausland — who also goes by the name "sk0t" — has since been released from jail, but on... Read more...
Sweden has convicted its first 'pirate' since the country made the downloading of music and movie files illegal in 2005.  45-year-old Jimmy Sjostrom was charged last October with infringing upon intellectual property rights when he allowed four music files to be shared from his computer. The penalty, a fine of a whopping 20,000 Swedish crowns ($2,843), is being seen by the International Federation for the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) as a victory in their war against file-sharing. The verdict only concerns four songs and it costs the one sentenced about 20,000 crowns in fines -- that is 5,000 crowns per song," IFPI said in a statement. "Illegal file-sharing... Read more...
For years people have used the internet to pirate all kinds of things, and until fairly recently the pirates rarely got in any serious trouble despite all the new anti-piracy laws passed in dozens of countries.  It seems like all of that is starting to change and it's hard to go a week without hearing about some new high profile case against online pirates like this: "We recently published an article that reported the U.S. FBI busted a Chicago resident who allegedly uploaded four episodes of "24" to the Internet.  Working under the online alias of ECOtotal, Romero uploaded the four episodes to LiveDigital.com, which made them available more than a week before the TV premiere.  Jorge Romero... Read more...
Now that Apple is offering some of its content DRM free users are finding that their names and email addresses are being added to the file details!  Here's a snippet from Wired: "Earlier this week, Apple iTunes 7.2 brought the new ability to download tracks from EMI Records without copy protection. But the unprotected files are labeled with the buyer's details, leading some to wonder if Apple is appending the information as an anti-piracy measure.But Apple is remaining mum about its reasoning." The article goes on to quote Jupiter Research analyst Michael Gartenberg, who seems to be a little confused about the difference between the words may and can, about the reasoning behind the change.... Read more...
For those of you who remember our school teacher friend Mr. Ponosov it may make you happy to know that recently a Russian court in the city of Perm threw out the charges of piracy brought against him. Ponosov's lawyers claimed that the twelve PCs that arrived at his school came with the pirated Microsoft software pre-installed and therefore he could not be held responsible. The case, probably a response to international pressure on Russia to crack down on piracy, may have been triggered by the fact that Russia has been ranked by industry experts as second in the world for illegal use of software and media only after China.  ... Read more...
While we may not see him playing a character opposite Jack Sparrow any time soon, Mikhail Gorbachev is doing his part to save a Russian teacher accused of piracy, Alexander Ponosov. The teacher, accused of using pirated software at his school, is seen by many Russians as the unfortunate sap who Microsoft has chosen to go after in order to set a precedent when it comes to piracy in the region. Gorbachev asked Bill Gates himself to personally intervene in the case and show mercy to Mr. Ponosov, since he only meant to help his students. In a response Gates said that Microsoft did not initiate the prosecution and that due to the small scale of the event, criminal proceedings would not be necessary.... Read more...
Traian Basescu, President of Romania, during a joint news conference with Microsoft's Bill Gates told press members that he thought piracy had done quite a deal of good for the nation's developing IT industry over the last decade. This comes as no surprise to Romanian President Traian Basescu. It is estimated that 70% of the software used in Romania is pirated -- and President Basecu is proud of it. In a recent joint news conference with Microsoft chairman and founder Bill Gates, Basecu had this to say about piracy; "Piracy helped the young generation discover computers. It set off the development of the IT industry in Romania."... Read more...
In a interesting twist, a New York boy accused by the Record Industry for being a 'pirate' is fighting back. Claiming he was downloading songs that he already owned on CD and that his accusers have no real way of proving he illegally downloaded, the now man and his attorney are demanding a trial by jury intended to seek among other things compensation for damage to his reputation, distracting him from school, and his family's legal fees. A New York teen, dubbed a pirate by the Record Industry, is counter suing them for defamation, violating anti-trust laws, conspiring to defraud the courts and making extortionate threats. In papers responding to a lawsuit filed... Read more...
YouTube has been a marvelous success. That's why Google paid 1.65 billion dollars to get their hands on it. Well, Google has decided to try to identify copyrighted material on their shiny new toy, and in a very serious way: A technology designed to detect copyright material could give YouTube a needed dose of legal legitimacy and calm any concerns Google Inc. has about spending $1.65 billion on the Internet video site. But that same technology could hurt YouTube's edgy appeal. While YouTube is known as the place to find almost any kind of video clip, recent agreements with high-profile content creators require YouTube to deploy an audio-signature technology that can spot a low-quality copy... Read more...
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