Items tagged with nook

If you need any further validation that e-books have finally made it big, here it is. The New York Times plans to launch a bestseller list for e-books in early 2011. The New York Times bestseller lists are the gold standard for defining a book's success. The print version of the bestseller lists are divided into several categories. For e-books, things will start "small." The New York Times will have only two lists covering fiction and non-fiction when it launches. Rankings will be independently verified by third party company RoyaltyShare. You can read the full press release below. The New York Times to Launch eBook Best-Seller Lists Independent Third Party, RoyaltyShare, Inc., Will Help Validate... Read more...
Yesterday, Barnes & Noble announced its new color-screen Nook e-reader known as the NOOKcolor. Recognizing that parents often use electronic devices to entertain their kids as well as themselves, Barnes & Noble also announced NOOK kids, which will make its debut on the new NOOKcolor. NOOK kids will offer nearly 12,000 popular children’s picture and chapter books in a digital format. Initially, NOOK kids will launch with more than 130 digital picture books. Barnes & Noble plans to double that number by the end of the year. Thanks to Barnes & Noble’s AliveTouch technology, kids can interact with words and pictures on the page. The technology can also read some stories... Read more...
Barnes & Noble announced last week that they would be holding a special event in the middle of New York City this week, and all eyes were situated on a potential color version of the NOOK e-reader. The event is underway today, and a color-screen NOOK is exactly what we have. B&N is simply calling this the Nook Color. The Nook Color offers a compelling feature set, but it shies away from the E-paper technology that B&N relied on in the past. In fact, we're beginning to wonder if the end isn't near for E Ink. The Kindle continues to use it, but with consumers demanding fast motion video playback, it looks like the LCD may once again rise. E Ink was at first used for its battery saving... Read more...
If it's true that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then Barnes and Noble should be blushing all kinds of red. That's because Amazon has made the decision to let Kindle users lend books to other Kindle device and Kindle app users, a feature Barnes and Noble's Nook had since Day 1. "Later this year, we will be introducing lending for Kindle, a new feature that lets you loan your Kindle books to other Kindle device or Kindle app users," Amazon announced in a blog post. "Each book can be lent once for a loan period of 14-days and the lender cannot read the book during the loan period. Additionally, not all e-books will be lendable - this is solely up to the publisher or rights holder,... Read more...
Barnes & Noble is planning an event in New York City shortly, and many are expecting a revised NOOK to be the highlight of the show. And if true, what better time than now to strike a deal with Walmart? The NOOK has been sold in a variety of places since being introduced last year, but Walmart wasn't one of them. Amazon's Kindle has slowly rolled out to various retailers as well, leaving B&N in a position of finding more retail outlets to stock it. The NOOK and Kindle are battling for e-reader supremacy right now, and with holiday shopping dollars on the line, it's vital to get your product in front of eyes at Walmart. This week, Barnes & Noble reached an agreement with Walmart to... Read more...
Interested in writing a novel? A children's book? Something else? What was once a pipe dream for many is now a reality: the publishing tools you need to get your creations out to the world are here courtesy of Barnes & Noble. Rather than having to hunt down a publisher and hope they like your work enough to put their name on it, B&N is doing for writing what the App Store did for software. PubIt! is a newly launched service that essentially acts as an App Store, but for book. Independent writers can create work, submit it for free, and have B&N convert their titles to ePUB format and then make them available for sale as an eBook. The best part is that PubIt! titles can be downloaded... Read more...
If you thought that the Kindle had everything wrapped up tight with a bow on top, think again. The Barnes & Noble NOOK has really taken off of late, particularly the platform. In other words, the NOOK has infiltrated a number of areas aside from the physical e-reader itself, with B&N this week announcing a new NOOK iPhone app, an overhauled iPad version and a PC version. The whole lot has been retooled with an updated user interface, and the iPad version even packs one extra special surprise: a rating systme. B&N calls the iPhone version the most personalized and easy-to-use eReading experience for iPhone and iPod touch owners, which is big talking considering that Amazon's Kindle... Read more...
It's dead, Jim. We seem to be repeating that a lot, lately. Another ill-received, or in this case, not received at all, product has bit the dust. The Plastic Logic QUE ProReader has been cancelled, to probably no one's surprise (the company's cancellation of pre-orders in June was a huge sign). Plastic Logic CEO Richard Archuleta said the following in a statement: "We recognize the market has dramatically changed, and with the product delays we have experienced, it no longer makes sense for us to move forward with our first-generation electronic reading product. This was a hard decision, but (it) is the best one for our company, our investors and our customers." The reasons behind this are many,... Read more...
Do you own a NOOK e-reader from Barnes & Noble? Do you wish you did? If you're in that second camp, and you own an Android phone using v1.6 or above, your dream has come true. For those who own smartphones and aren't interested in buying an actual e-reader in order to read digital books on, both Amazon and B&N are vying for business from e-book sales. In order to expand that portion of their businesses to as many consumers as possible, both companies have established apps on Android that allow consumers to access titles just like would if you owned the e-reader itself. B&N is follwing Amazon's app from a few weeks back, this week introducing NOOK for Android. The app can now be downloaded... Read more...
If there's one area where companies have flocked to play catch up, it's the tablet PC market. There's no doubt that the race to catch the iPad is on, but there's one other area where companies have also been flocking, albeit with less commotion. That's the e-reader market, where Amazon's Kindle still dominates and the Barnes & Noble NOOK is the next closest competitor. But a lot of smaller companies are attempting to undercut the big players with cheaper, less featured devices. Only time will tell if people really are willing to pay less for e-readers without 3G or Wi-Fi, but we suspect that Sharp won't be one of those companies who just strips their e-reader down in hopes of competing. According... Read more...
Color e-ink. It's a fairly tale, of sorts. It's a technology that we know exists, and we know that many companies are working on making it into something that can be produced commercially. But today, the only e-paper that exists in the consumer realm is the black/white kind that's found on the NOOK and Kindle. For well over five years, certain companies have attempted to produce a backlight-free color version of the e-ink displays that are used today on e-readers, but it's obviously a difficult task. It's always hard to have your cake and it too (so to speak), and color e-ink is a dramatic case of exactly that. But Hewlett-Packard, a company that isn't often associated with cutting-edge display... Read more...
Barnes & Noble's NOOK started as just an e-reader. It was the primary rival to Amazon's Kindle, and it offered something major that Amazon couldn't: another screen. But the lower color LCD that enables users to wade through book titles isn't the only thing. B&N can also showcase their device in their wide array of stores, and getting the device in front of faces is also a huge plus. But one thing that B&N has done that's more interesting than any of that is turn NOOK into more than a product; today, it's a brand. NOOK now stands for all-things-ebook with relation to Barnes & Noble, and if you thought that the bookseller was content just moving titles to regular consumers, think... Read more...
Last week, Amazon trimmed the price and improved the features of its flagship Kindle DX product and now it's apparently Sony's turn. As of today, the Reader Pocket Edition is $149 (down from $169), the Touch Edition is $169 (down from $199) and the Sony Daily Edition (the DX's primary competitor) is now $299, down from $349. That's quite a bit cheaper than even the Kindle DX's new pricetag of $379, and it tells us everything we need to know about Sony's position in the e-reader market:  It's losing. Look! It's the E-reader from that...from that other company! The price cuts on the Pocket Edition and the Touch Edition should keep them competitive against hardware from Barnes and Nobles' Nook... Read more...
It's hard to argue that more competition is better for consumers, and that's proving true once again in the growing e-reader market. For awhile, Amazon's Kindle dominated the entire space, and they pretty much ran the show. The Kindle (and subsequent revisions) were always priced rather fairly in the eyes of critics, but there's nothing like a surprise price drop to really get interest growing. In the hours following Barnes & Noble's announcement of the Wi-Fi only NOOK (and the price drop on the 3G + Wi-Fi NOOK to just $199), Amazon decided to cut the price of their Kindle (with global 3G wireless + Wi-Fi) in order to better compete. Before B&N's reveal, the Kindle was priced at $259.... Read more...
Who says Amazon will always rule the e-reader market? Barnes & Noble has been playing hardball ever since the company released the original NOOK, and now things have been stepped up a notch further. Today, the world's largest bookseller (who just so happens to sell their own e-reader) has introduced a new Wi-Fi only NOOK, and beyond that, also lowered the price on the existing Wi-Fi + 3G NOOK. Starting now, the existing NOOK (Wi-Fi + 3G) is available for just $199, which is a good bit less than what Amazon is currently charging for the Kindle. Also, the new Wi-Fi only NOOK, which is useful for those who generally only download new material when at home or in a coffee shop with free Wi-Fi... Read more...
Many could argue that the last thing the world needs is another e-book reader, but we aren't yet in that camp. Amazon's Kindle and the Barnes & Noble Nook could use the competition, and Acer is a solid name in the industry with what appears to be a solid idea of how they plan to change it up (with "it" being the e-reader market). The company has recently announced their 6" LumiRead, which is half-typical e-reader, and half-all new. The entire devices measures only a few millimeters thick, and it's outfitted with 2GB of memory for storing books and other materials. Of course, it uses a no-backlight e-ink display (rather than an LCD, like many of the cheaper e-readers that are emerging these... Read more...
The e-reader market is a questionable one right now. Some say that it's fine, and that true bookworms will continue to support E-Ink based devices. But some say that tablets and multi-use devices such as the iPad pose a great threat to e-readers, which are generally limited in what all they can do. One thing that is very clear, though, is that the Barnes & Noble Nook is just about the only e-reader in America to seriously rival the Kindle, and while other options are out there, few are as well thought-out, well-connected and well-designed as the two of these. Amazon has been letting blossoming authors self-publish titles onto the Kindle e-Bookstore for months, and while B&N is a bit behind... Read more...
The NOOK gets a serious update, the Kindle gets a serious partner in sales. Just another rosy day in the crowded e-book reader market. Up until now, Amazon's record-breaking Kindle has been sold in just one primary place: online. A virtual store with no real shelves, no real boxes and nothing for consumers to touch, see and experience. Amazon has had to rely on videos, text-based reviews and word-of-mouth in order to market their Kindle, and somehow, they've done an astounding job. Being "first to market" with a legitimate, 3G-enabled e-reader was a huge help, but still, it's sort of amazing to think about how many Kindles have been sold when it's impossible to just waltz into a Walmart and touch... Read more...
Anyone who ever told you that a single company owning the market was a good thing had their head in the clouds. In the latest edition of "why competition works," the Barnes & Noble NOOK e-reader is seeing one of the most impressive updates in a long time, and we have to believe that this update wouldn't be nearly as robust without Amazon's Kindle, Spring Design's Alex and Apple's iPad sitting beside it on the virtual shelves. These days, consumers have lots of choices when it comes to buying an e-book reader and/or tablet, so without a nice feature set, it's easy to overlook one and head right for another. It's clear that B&N doesn't want their recently launched NOOK to become the one... Read more...
Barnes & Noble plans to sell its Nook eBook reader at Best Buy starting April 18th. The specialty bookstore chain is expanding the distribution of the $259.99 Nook as it faces growing competition from Apple's iPad. The deal between Best Buy and Barnes & Noble will put the Nook in 1,070 Best Buy stores and will also place Barnes & Noble's BN eReader software on some of the personal computers and smartphones the electronics retailer sells. The deal with Best Buy will not only increase the Nook's availability (previously it was only available through Barnes & Noble's website and in 723 of its bookstores), but it will also improve the eBook reader's ability to compete with the recently... Read more...
We're just around two weeks out from seeing a deluge of iPad news (given that it ships on April 3rd), and already companies are racing one another to get iPad-specific apps out on the App Store. A New York Ties report on the sprint has a few notable entries, and if companies really do put in the time and effort needed to create iPad apps that are more than just pixel-doubled versions of the same apps already on the iPhone, the product might just have a chance at being more "than just a big iPod touch."Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble have both announced that they'll be working on apps for buying and reading e-books, which is certainly interesting considering that Apple will also be installed... Read more...
Barnes & Noble plans to offer a version of its eReader software designed for the iPad. The eReader will enable users to access more than one million eBooks, magazines, and newspapers in the Barnes & Noble eBookstore as well as content in a user's own Barnes & Noble digital library. Even though the iPad will compete against Barnes & Noble's own device, the Nook, the bookseller is sticking with its commitment to provide the eReader software for as many screens as possible. Barnes & Noble's free eReader software is currently available for most computing and mobile devices such as the PC, Mac, iPhone, iPod touch, and BlackBerry. With Apple entering the e-reader space, some book... Read more...
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