Items tagged with google chrome

Google Chrome 56 is finally here. The latest web browser update addresses 51 bugs (over 20 of which were identified by external contributors) and introduces a slew of new features. This update is a welcome addition for Chrome’s 1 billion users on Windows, macOS, and Linux. Google Chrome now issues a warning when websites that collect passwords or credit card numbers but do not utilize HTTPS. In the past, Chrome used a green label for secure websites, and a neutral icon for websites that did not use HTTPS. A red triangle will now serve as a warning. Firefox 51 did something similar earlier this week. Page reloads are also now quite a bit faster. Users usually hit the reload button if their page... Read more...
“Make a America Great Again”? Apparently, ain’t nobody got time for that. We all know that what this world actually needs is more furry creatures — more specifically, cuddly kittens. That where a Google Chrome extension comes into play, which is simply called “Make America Kitten Again”. The extension, which can be added to Chrome here, will simply replace all images of Donald Trump found on a website with adorable pictures of kittens. The pictures offer a humorous lightening of the atmosphere for what can at times be serious issues. Take for example the image below on a Reuters article about Trump’s plan to “drain the swamp” and instill a cabinet full of business titans and retired generals:... Read more...
There’s no question that Google Chrome is by far the most dominant player in the desktop browser market. As we reported in early November, Chrome has more market share than both Internet Explorer and Edge combined. And over the past year, Chrome has seen its market share climb from 35 percent to 55 percent. During its meteoric rise, Microsoft has done its best to assail Chrome and promote its Edge browser as the faster and more efficient choice for Windows 10 users. But with Chrome 53, Google gave Windows 10 users a 15 percent speed boost by using Microsoft Profile Guided Optimization (PGO) technology. Now, with Chrome 55, Google is putting the browser’s insane memory usage in check. Chrome 55,... Read more...
Google's Chrome is the most used internet browser on the planet, but it is not without its faults. Chrome has been routinely criticized for its excessive memory usage and battery consumption over the years, and Google is taking steps to combat both problems. After taking repeated blows to the head from Microsoft over Chrome’s impact on battery life compared to Edge, Google publicized its efforts to give mobile users longer runtimes. While it is still unlikely to match Edge’s battery performance in Windows 10 (for now), the improvements are definitely noteworthy. Now, Google is exorcizing another Chrome demon: memory usage. More specifically, Google has optimized Chrome’s V8 JavaScript engine... Read more...
Over the past few months, Microsoft has attacked Google Chrome for its propensity to chew through notebook batteries at a rapid pace. Any enthusiast that uses Chrome on a regular basis (and that includes the majority of the computing populace) knows that the browser is a resource hog, but Microsoft has been looking to spread the word around in an effort to prop up its competing Edge browser in Windows 10. After sitting on the sidelines while Microsoft pummeled Chrome in benchmark after benchmark, Google finally responded with the release of Chrome 53. Using Microsoft’s Surface Books as benchmark machines, Google proclaimed that in the past year it has made a 15 percent gain in performance with... Read more...
It’s safe to say that Adobe Flash is one of the most disliked pieces of software in the modern computing era. What started off as an innovative way for users to experience interactive content and simple online games has transformed into a resource hog and significant security risk. Software vendors have taken extreme measures to scale back support for the plugin and Adobe itself has announced that Flash will soon be on the chopping block. This week, we’re learning that Google is taking further steps to ensure Flash’s demise. Starting in the fourth quarter, Google Chrome will default to HTML5 instead of Flash. What this means is that if a website provides a choice of displaying either HTML5 or... Read more...
There was once a time when Google Chrome was the fast, fresh-faced browser on the market. Now, seven years after it was first introduced in beta, Chrome has become a lot more bloated and not as lithe as it used to be. Google hopes to change that with its new Brotli compression algorithm, which will take the place of its current Zopfli counterpart. Brotli was first discussed back in September 2015, and uses a “new data format” to allow for 20 to 26 percent higher compression ratios than what’s possible with Zopfli. “We show that Brotli is roughly as fast as zlib’s Deflate implementation,” said Google software engineer Zoltan Szabadka in September. “At the same time, it compresses slightly more... Read more...
Star Wars: The Force Awakens is poised to become the biggest movie of 2015; and perhaps even the biggest movie of all time. With years of hype surrounding its release along with a big name director helming the project, J.J. Abrahams, there’s no question that fans are eager to get get a taste of what Disney has to offer with the newest Star Wars trilogy. However, with all the hype comes the possibility for spoilers. And with our lives these days revolving around the Internet, it’s almost impossibly to avoid spoilers for movies that we have yet to see. If details of a film aren’t spoiled by our Twitter accounts or Facebook News Feeds, perhaps just visiting one of our favorite websites could be... Read more...
Can I get an “Amen” from the congregation? The planets are aligning and it appears that more heavy-hitters are throwing support behind taking down one the Internet’s greatest villains: Adobe Flash. Back in June, we brought you news that Google would be introducing a new “Intelligent Pause” function to Chrome that would disable all Flash content by default (or give Chrome the option to choose what Flash content is deemed worthy). If for some reason you actually need to access a blocked Flash element on a site, you will have the option to click on the element to re-enable it. Google favors HTML5 over Flash Google today confirmed that Chrome will block Flash elements by default starting on September... Read more...
If you perform a clean install of Windows 10, you shouldn’t be too surprised that Microsoft Edge is chosen as your default web browser. After all, it’s the only browser installed by default (well, I guess you could also count the old and decrepit Internet Explorer, which still lingers around for compatibility purposes). But when performing an upgrade from Windows 7 or Windows 8 to Windows 10, you would expect for the installer to retain your preferences for the default web browser. Unfortunately, expectations don’t often match reality. If you have a competing browser like Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome set as your default browser before upgrading to Window 10, this selection will be overridden... Read more...
For fans of J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle-Earth, Google released “A Journey through Middle-Earth.” It is an interactive map of the Middle-Earth where everyone can explore all 27 locations that were shown in the Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit film trilogies. But now the map has been updated to include a peer-to-peer battle game. “Completely new for this year’s version is a peer-to-peer battle game where you can challenge your friends to a test of skill,” says Google Chrome product manager Ellison-Taylor. “The peer-to-peer gameplay experience was built primarily using the latest web technologies, including WebRTC and WebGL. It’s touch optimized for laptops, phones and tablets, bringing you a stunning... Read more...
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