Items tagged with DDoS

Just because an attack is bizarre doesn’t mean it isn’t dangerous. According to security researcher Brian Krebs (pictured), the FBI and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) posted a security bulletin concerning TDoS (telephony denial-of-service) attacks on PSAPs (public safety answering points). “Information received from multiple jurisdictions indicates the possibility of attacks targeting the telephone systems of public sector entities. Dozens of such attacks have targeted the administrative PSAP lines (not the 911 emergency line),” reads the bulletin in part. “The perpetrators of the attack have launched high volume of calls against the target network, tying... Read more...
DDoSing a Web server has become the de facto way to exact revenge on someone, or some company. Not a week, or sometimes even a day, will go by when you can't read about some ongoing DDoS attack. We've seen them spawned by Internet goofs to professional criminals. DDoSing is easy, and it's effective. That's why it's so heavily-used. Usually, though, DDoS effects are not quite like what we saw with Spamhaus earlier this week. As mentioned in that post, a record-setting 300Gbit/s was shot at Spamhaus and its host, CloudFlare, crippling a portion of the Internet to much of the UK and other regions in Europe. The first thing that might come to mind when a DDoS attack strikes is, "What could... Read more...
If you've had a difficult time connecting to select websites over the past few days, there's a very good chance that an on-going attack against spam-prevention agency Spamhaus is to blame. Spamhaus, based in London and Geneva, helps e-mail providers filter spam, and to do this, it manages a blocklist that includes any server verified to be used for the sole purpose of distributing unwanted content. You can see where this is going. Cyberbunker, a host that touts its willingness to host anything outside of child pornography and terrorism materials, recently found itself on Spamhaus' blocklist. It hasn't taken too kindly to the inclusion, and has begun working with "criminal gangs" in Eastern Europe... Read more...
A company that protects against DDoS attacks, Prolexic Technologies, released its attack report for Q3 2011. There’s a lot to the report, including that Prolexic mitigated what it claims is the largest event in 2011 (in terms of packet-per-second volume). That attack occurred between November 5-12 and, according to Prolexic, portends the increasing scale and complexity of DDoS attacks. Indeed, the report shows that DDoS attacks are increasing in terms of bandwidth (up 66% from Q3 2010) and packets-per-second, which is up nearly four-fold from the same time period a year ago. What is perhaps most notable, however, is where the attacks are coming from. The report found that China was the... Read more...
Rather than taking action against Sony that could affect end users, Anonymous is planning a public event that will target Sony stores in a 24-hour, in-store boycott around world on Saturday, April 16. The public Facebook event has more than 1,100 RSVPs at the time of this writing. The event is called Operation Sony and will begin at 12:00 AM April 16 and run until 12 AM April 17. On Monday, April 4, Anonymous launched a DDoS attack on Sony, rendering the PlayStation Network (PSN) inaccessible for much of the day. At the same time, an Anonymous offshoot group which called itself "SonyRecon" targeted individual Sony employees. However, end users complained that the attack on PSN was hurting gamers,... Read more...
A distributed denial-of-service attack on one (yes, one) person yesterday left news media in a quandary. With no Twitter, and no Facebook either, how was the news to be obtained? Seriously, however, the outage was the result of attacks across several services aimed directly at a blogger named Cyxymu from the Eastern European country of Georgia. Max Kelly, chief security officer at Facebook, told C|Net:"It was a simultaneous attack across a number of properties targeting him to keep his (Cyxymu) voice from being heard. We're actively investigating the source of the attacks, and we hope to be able to find out the individuals involved in the back end and to take action against them, if we can."Twitter... Read more...
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