Items tagged with COM

A new commercial PC game came out two days ago from a brand new game development and publishing company. The game is called CellZenith and the company is called Faramix Enterprises. What make this a unique story is not actually the game (full disclosure: we've not played the game, so we cannot comment intelligently about it), but the story behind the game's making and the genesis of the company... Credit: Faramix Enterprises Three young men in their twenties, from three different states, enrolled in the online bachelor's degree program for Game and Simulation Programming (GSP) with DeVry University. Their mutual interest in games development quickly clicked with each other and they not only decided... Read more...
For the last few years, vendors have been trying to convince us that computers will become our digital media hubs and we'll extend that experience to our living room TVs. Microsoft's Windows Media Center and its "ten-foot experience" is perhaps the best-known example of this idea. The recent explosion of readily available online media is starting to at least prove the part about the PC being the media hub true; but transferring the computer interface to the living room TV has proven to be rather stubbornly stagnant. So why not instead move the living room TV experience to the computer?   Credit: NeroThat is exactly what Nero is doing with its new LiquidTV | TiVo PC package--which brings... Read more...
IBM Opens Four Cloud Computing Centers to Meet Growing Demand in Emerging MarketsWorld's Largest Network of Cloud Computing Centers Brings Skills Closer to Clients and Opportunities ARMONK, NY - 24 Sep 2008: IBM (NYSE: IBM) today opened four new cloud computing centers in emerging markets. They are in Sao Paulo, Brazil; Bangalore, India; Seoul, Korea; and Hanoi, Vietnam, where there is an increasing demand for Internet-based computing models and skills to help companies compete in highly competitive environments. With previously opened centers in both emerging and mature markets, IBM now has 13 cloud computing centers, the world's largest network of expertise on cloud computing.At a time when... Read more...
The launch of the Google's first Android phone, the T-Mobile G1, was both widely anticipated and highly covered.  Of course, one big negative, one frequently pointed out as a real problem for the iPhone as well, is the associated carrier with the device.  T-Mobile has the smallest 3G footprint of any major carrier, and additionally --- well, the devil is in the details.T-Mobile's advertised data plan for the $179 phone are $25 for unlimited data and voice and 400 text messages, or $35 for unlimited everything.  Well, that's when you really, really need to take out your magnifying glass, and take a look at their 3G details page (as linked to this story).  Look at the very bottom... Read more...
Large corporations, universities, and research labs have relied on high-performance computers (HPC)--or "supercomputers"--for years to solve complex problems in science, engineering, financial modeling, and other similar uses requiring advanced, heavy-duty computations. The high cost of these systems and their complexity have often kept them out of the hands of smaller companies, institutions, and departments that don't have the budget or resources to purchase and maintain them. Cray ("The Supercomputer Company"--yes, that supercomputer company) in partnership with Microsoft, hope to rectify that with today's announcement of an "affordable" supercomputer, the Cray CX1.    Credit: Cray... Read more...
In a move that will leave many saying, "Duh! What took so long," the Internet Movie Database (IMDb.com) has just added movie and TV streaming to its site. IMDb has long been the first stop for many (IMDb.com claims 57 million users) looking to find information related to movies, TV shows, and the people associated with them, such as actors and filmmakers. Available now, the Amazon.com-owned company hosts "over 6,000 full-length feature films and TV episodes for free." This new features is currenly labeled as a "Beta." IMDb.com will feature a rotating selection of video content from providers such as "CBS, Hulu, Sony Pictures Television and over 500 independent filmmakers." Content will include... Read more...
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been collecting lots of headlines this week as it finally ramped up to full speed. It has garnered attention for the massively sized experiments it will undertake (simulating conditions of the Big Bang), the questions its experiments will seek to answer (find the "God" particle), the cost of the project ($7.9 Billion), and even the fear that the LHC itself could create a black hole that would swallow up the Earth (it didn't... at least not yet). So it's understandable that a project of this magnitude would receive lots of attention--especially one of the more public of the experiments, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment, which is "one of the four 'eyes'... Read more...
What is the most important thing to you that you can do on the Internet? Forget communicating and gathering information; according to results from a just-released study, for ten percent of all U.S. online households, entertainment is the single-most important thing that the Internet offers. In fact, the study indicates that nearly 20 percent of all U.S. households are now watching TV broadcasts online. This matches the results that came out of a similar study about a month ago that said that 20 percent of primetime TV is watched online."Most consumers are pressed for time and require flexibility in their daily schedules and TV viewing habits," says Lynn Franco, Director of The Conference Board... Read more...
You didn't seriously think Comcast would roll over without a fight, did you? It was only a matter of time after FCC's decision in early August, before Comcast took some legal action. And here we are. Last month, the FCC voted 3-2 to declare that Comcast's throttling of BitTorrent P2P traffic last year was illegal. At that time the FCC ordered Comcast to not just stop blocking P2P traffic, but also to provide more details of its network management policies within 30 days. According to the Wall Street Journal (paid subscription required), Comcast on Thursday filed suit to overturn the ruling. At the same time, despite this, Comcast indicated it will continue to abide by the earlier FCC order, including... Read more...
There is little doubt that Internet access for many of us has transmogrified from the realm of useful tool to downright obsession. In fact, about a month ago we reported on a study that showed that 46 percent of U.S. e-mail users claim to be addicted to e-mail. Now a new study coming out of the U.K. gives a name to the malady we suffer when we can't get our fix of Internet access: "Discomgoogolation." The term "discomgoogolation" is a combination of the word "discombobulate" and "Google." (As a completely unrelated thought, why isn't "combobulate" a real word?) British Psychologists created the word "discomgoogolation" to mean a "feeling of distress or anxiety when unable to gain immediate information... Read more...
A job posting spotted on ComputerJobs.com shows that Microsoft is looking for a Senior Product Manager for a project called Skymarket, a "a v1 marketplace service for Windows Mobile." With both Apple and Google either having or planning centralized stores for applications for their platforms, Microsoft's been the odd-man out. There are various stores that sell Windows Mobile software, but nothing centralized and Microsoft-backed. According to the job post: Key Responsibilities include the following: Definition of the product offering, pricing, business model and policies that will make the Windows Mobile marketplace "the place to be" for developers wishing to distribute and monetize their Windows... Read more...
On Thursday Comcast announced a 250 GB cap for their broadband service.  We applauded the fact that they finally gave some transparency to their "hidden" cap, which had always snagged a few users, without telling them exactly how much their use should be, but then we realized: where's the meter? Time-Warner Cable is currently trying out metered service in Beaumont, TX. Their caps are lower, but they do provide one thing: a page you can go to in order to check your usage. And what's interesting is the response you get if you ask Comcast about any plans for a meter: Charlie Douglas, who is Director of Corporate Communications for Comcast's Online & Voice Services, and who wrote us back... Read more...
How many of you are aware of the 5 GB cap that Frontier DSL has imposed?  Or of the trials in Beaumont, TX that Time-Warner Cable is running?  It's only a matter of time before others impose caps.  And here we are, with a big ISP imposing a cap.  But really, let's be honest: this ISP already had one, just one that was hidden.Today Comcast detailed its new "network management" policies.  Basically, they set a 250 GB cap on users, effective October first.  It should be noted that for years people have complained about a "hidden" cap that Comcast had, whereupon it would terminate a user's account without giving him or her exact numbers.  Now we have an exact number. ... Read more...
Broadcom to Acquire Digital TV Business from AMD- Acquisition Expected to Bring Broadcom Scale, a Complete Product Line to Address All Segments of the Digital TV Market and Expand Tier One Customer Base -IRVINE and SUNNYVALE, Calif. — August 25, 2008 — Broadcom Corporation (Nasdaq: BRCM), a global leader in semiconductors for wired and wireless communications, and AMD (NYSE: AMD) today announced that the companies have entered into a definitive agreement for Broadcom to acquire AMD’s digital TV (DTV) business.The acquisition of AMD’s DTV business is expected to enable Broadcom to immediately scale its DTV business, and, in conjunction with its existing products, to offer a complete product line... Read more...
You'll probably remember the portent of things to come: New York State's new sales tax on Internet retailers, which went into effect in June. Both Amazon.com and Overstock.com have sued over the tax, in fact, which was written so as to apply "physical presence" to retailers who had affiliates (generally, web sites advertising for the retailer) based in New York. Formerly, only retailers which an actual brick-and-mortar presence in a state were required to collect sales tax. New York legislators went so far as to nickname the new tax the "Amazon tax." The announcement was made to Newegg customers residing in New York in an email on Friday. The email said:Dear Valued Newegg Customer, As a result... Read more...
In the final IDF keynote address on Wednesday, Vice President and General Manager for Software and Solutions at Intel, Renee James, spoke about the "digital revolution" and what sort of opportunities the recent advances in Intel technology will enable.       Just as the Pentium processor helped shepherd in multimedia on the PC, multi-core processors are opening the door further for HD and 3D worlds on computers. James stated that all of Intel's platforms will be multi-core by 2010.    As an example of the kind of real-world, immersive environment recent processor improvements are enabling, James showed a preview of Ubisoft's FarCry 2, which is due out this November.... Read more...
Antec Enters the Mobile Computing MarketCBB Certified Components Enable System Builders to Locally Build a TrulyCustomized LaptopFremont, CA - August 19, 2008 - Antec, Inc., the leading global provider of high-performance components for the gaming, PC Upgrade and Do-It-Yourself markets, today announced that it is launching a new line of standard components for the mobile computing market. These interchangeable components-known as common building blocks and developed according to a common set of specifications initiated by Intel-continue Antec's legacy as a pioneer in standards-based computing components and extend its reach into the fast-growing portable computing market. The announcement marks... Read more...
Intel's Aaron Brezenski recently made an entry to the Intel Software Network Software Blogs entitled "Welcome to G45! Better (but still imperfect...)" in which he talks about the introduction of the new G45 chipset and the early issues facing the chipset. In the post, Aaron talks about some of the good, bad, and ugly issues Intel is dealing with in regard to the G45's IGP and its capabilities in a home theater setup. In the blog post, Aaron says, "The first couple weeks of motherboard availability on Intel's latest and greatest integrated graphics chipset have been tumultuous.First, our competition threw together a demo booth which stated baldly that HP laptops with G(M)45 did not accelerate... Read more...
Apparently, Linux kernel creator, Linus Torvalds has no problem expressing his opinion, and did so vehemently via back-and-forth e-mails with the editors of Network World this week. What got Torvalds so heated is his perception of how security vulnerabilities are so incredibly over-hyped to the extent that he calls it a "security circus." What started this whole tirade, was a post Torvalds made to the Linux kernel developer newsgroup four weeks ago where he lobbed his opinions of how the "security circus... glorifies and... encourages the wrong behavior," and where he saved his cruelest and most politically-incorrect statement for the uber-security-minded, OpenBSD developers: Linus Torvalds... Read more...
Microsoft has created a blog dedicated to Windows 7, the upcoming (in 2010, according to Microsoft) successor to Windows Vista. The first post in the blog, Microsoft said that first in-depth technical details will come at the Professional Developers Conference (PDC) and the Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC), both scheduled for October.We have two significant events for developers and the overall ecosystem around Windows this fall. The Professional Developers Conference (PDC) on October 27 and the Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) the following week both represent the first venues where we will provide in-depth technical information about Windows 7. This blog will... Read more...
Telecommuting makes a lot of sense. Having information workers gathered into cubicle farms in a central location is so 1960s. The ability to quickly exchange information from remote locations, coupled with the high cost in time and energy to commute to the old office park, makes it increasingly popular now, and probably the de facto standard in the not too distant future. There's one problem in the short term: Your ISP doesn't care if you exist. ...good luck trying to use your virtual private network, or VPN, while sending e-mail and surfing the Web. According to a Forrester Research study released Wednesday, telecommunication companies don't focus on consumers who work from home. As a result,... Read more...
Forget the quest to build the $100 computer; a group of graduate students think they can create the $12 computer--the perfect PC for developing countries. And no, this is not the $10 computer than India announced last week--which turned out to actually be a $100 computer. But India does play an important role in this story...Graduate student, Derek Lomas who lives in India, noticed inexpensive "TV Computers" being sold in India for 500 rupees (less than $12 based on today's exchange rates). Lomas was intrigued by the low price and wide availability of the TV Computers, but was skeptical as to their usefulness. Lomas finally bought one and this is his impression, which he reported on his blog... Read more...
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next ... Last