Items tagged with browsers

In order to avoid erecting a paywall, webmasters who want to keep their content 'free' must walk a fine line between delivering ads to pay the bills (and writers), and not overwhelming readers, who might be tempted to enable an ad blocker. In a sense, browser makers also have a balancing act on their hands. One thing they seem to agree on, though, is that autoplaying audible video and audio is undesirable, and so Mozilla is planning to crack down on this with Firefox 66. "We know that unsolicited volume can be a great source of distraction and frustration for users of the web. So we are making changes to how Firefox handles playing media with sound. We want to make sure web developers are aware... Read more...
Microsoft may have hoped that its Edge browser for Windows 10 would come to dominate Chrome and Firefox, but that never came to be, and never will, at least not in its current form. Instead, the Redmond outfit recently announced plans to overhaul Edge and rebuild it around Chromium, the same platform that powers Chrome. Interestingly, however, Microsoft can (and does) claim a victory over its rivals in the browser space. It has nothing to do with market share, as Firefox and especially Chrome are both more widely used than Edge, according to data collected by places like Net Applications and Stat Counter. Where Microsoft claims its victory is in battery life. "The Microsoft Edge team measured... Read more...
Microsoft made somewhat of a surprise announcement last week when it detailed plans to overhaul its struggling (in terms of market share) Edge browser and rebuild it around Chromium (much to Mozilla's dismay), the exact same platform that powers Google's own customized Chrome browser. That's a big change, but will Edge support Chrome's extensive library of extensions? If all goes to plan, the answer is yes. Microsoft is rebuilding its Edge browser around Chromium That wasn't a topic Microsoft chose to address in its blog post announcing the upcoming change to Edge. However, Edge product manager Kyle Alden stated in a discussion on Reddit that his browser team has every intention of baking in... Read more...
A bug in Firefox that was first reported 12 years ago is still being exploited by malicious websites. The bug essentially allows a malicious site to ensnare a user by repeatedly showing them an "Authentication Required" pop-up login box. When the users tries to close the login box, a new one appears. The only way out is to close the browser. Users have reported this flaw in Firefox several times over the years, including yesterday (Saturday), but it's never been resolved. Here's the most recent report (edited for clarity)... "When I was browsing some site, a pop-up ad window appeared... At first I thought it is just an annoying advertising site and I went to close it," the user wrote. "However,... Read more...
Google has been catching some flak for a feature it recently introduced into its Chrome browser, one that automatically logs users into the browser whenever they visit a Google website or service, such as Gmail. Starting with Chrome 70, Google will give users the option of disabling this controversial feature if they want to. "While we think sign-in consistency will help many of our users, we’re adding a control that allows users to turn off linking web-based sign-in with browser-based sign-in—that way users have more control over their experience. For users that disable this feature, signing into a Google website will not sign them into Chrome," Google stated in a blog post. In announcing... Read more...
Despite all the effort Microsoft is expending in getting Internet users to try out and stick with its Edge browser, Chrome continues to the popular choice. Even worse for Microsoft, Chrome's popularity is growing—it now accounts for more than half of all desktop browser usage and has nearly double the market share of Edge and Internet Explorer combined. Market research firm Net Applications has Chrome sitting pretty with a 54.99 percent share of the desktop browser market, up from 31.12 percent at this moment a year ago, while Internet Explorer and Edge combine for 28.39 percent and Firefox stuck at around 11 percent. Even more interesting is that when Windows 10 launched to the public at the... Read more...
We suspect there are some high-fives flying around in Mozilla's offices this morning, as the company's Firefox browser has now caught up with and even slightly bumped ahead of both Internet Explorer and Edge combined in desktop browser market share, according to data provided by StatsCounter. It's the narrowest of victories with Firefox claiming a 15.6 percent share of the desktop browser market at the end of April, compared to 15.5 percent for Microsoft's two browsers combined. In horse racing, that would be a photo finish. Even if you want to call it a tie, which you'd be justified in doing, Microsoft can't be thrilled that more users aren't adopting its Edge browser. "Microsoft might have... Read more...
Microsoft built a brand new browser for Windows 10 called Edge, though it isn't proving as popular as the operating system it comes bundled on. One way Microsoft hopes to change that is by adding a new prompt when users install a third-party browser like Google Chrome and attempt to switch defaults.The prompt appears in a leaked preview build of Windows 10 (build 10568), so it might be only a matter of time before it's implemented in Windows 10 through a future update. If so, users who try to switch their default browser from Edge to something else will see a prompt that says "Give Microsoft Edge a shot," followed a short of list of features. It reads as follows:Before you switch defaults, see... Read more...
Microsoft is giving Internet Explorer and Project Spartan browser users a heads up that in future releases, the Do Not Track feature will no longer be enabled by default. On the surface (no pun intended), Microsoft's reasoning for the change is that enabling the privacy feature by default only encourages websites to ignore the setting and use tracking cookies anyway.It's not such an odd leap of logic, and it's one that the World Wide Web Consortium (WC3) agrees with. As WC3 explains, sending a signal to disable tracking "MUST reflect the user's preference, not the choice of some vendor, institution, site, or network-imposed mechanism outside the user's control." So when no user choice exists... Read more...
Microsoft's Internet Explorer has a huge advantage in the browser wars because it ships with every copy of Windows, which is why the European Union forced the software maker to offer a so-called browser ballot on new Windows PCs. What's interesting, however, is that even though IE is usually the default option on most workplace computers, the influx of alternative devices such as smartphones and tablets is leading to more browser diversity, according to recent research by Forrester. According to Forrester, IE claims a 40.2 percent share of the browser market, trumping Google Chrome at 27.8 percent and Mozilla Firefox at 25.4 percent, VentureBeat reports. Apple's Safari browser trails far behind... Read more...
Another month is in the books, and once again, Internet Explorer is the browser to beat, in terms of market share. IE closed out October with a majority share of 54.13 percent, well ahead of Firefox at 19.99 percent and Chrome at 18.55 percent, but a closer look at the numbers reveals some interesting trends. For one, IE increased its install base for the second consecutive month, and is up by exactly 1.5 percentage points compared to October 2011. So not only is IE still on top, but it's managed to climb higher since a year ago. That's bad news for Firefox, which dropped below 20 percent for the first time in several years, and declined 2.53 percent compared to a year ago. Chrome isn't faring... Read more...
This news story comes straight from the "We couldn't make this up" file. It's a well known fact that banks offer different interest rates to different customers depending on the applicant's credit history, credit rating, and annual income. Somewhere along the line, one's choice of browser was apparently slipped into the mix. Would-be borrowers who visit Capital One's auto loan calculator are presented with a range of rates; we've got the screenshots below to prove it. That's Firefox 3.6.12 on the upper left, Internet Explorer 8.0.6001.18943 on the upper right. Chrome 7.0.517.41 is lower left, Opera 10.63 (Build 3516) on the lower right. You might think this is a bug or a problem with the flash... Read more...
The current crop of web browsers are total crap. Let me explain...Today's web browsers seem to be still mired in the Internet of five years ago. Back then, the browser wars were in full swing, and different browsers tried to lock you into their view of the Internet universe. Today's web is a multifaceted content multiverse. Yet despite common features like tabbed browsing, today's browsers still try to lock you in. Some sites are only viewable in Internet Explorer. Firefox locks you in with the vast array of cool plugins. Google Chrome grabs you with its integration into the Googleverse, particularly Google Apps. Apple's Safari appeals to Mac and iPhone owners. It's a ridiculous, fragmented state... Read more...
The current crop of web browsers are total crap.  Let me explain...Today's web browsers seem to be still mired in the Internet of five years ago. Back then, the browser wars were in full swing, and different browsers tried to lock you into their view of the Internet universe. Today's web is a multifaceted content multiverse. Yet despite common features like tabbed browsing, today's browsers still try to lock you in. Some sites are only viewable in Internet Explorer. Firefox locks you in with the vast array of cool plugins. Google Chrome grabs you with its integration into the Googleverse, particularly Google Apps. Apple's Safari appeals to Mac and iPhone owners. It's a ridiculous, fragmented... Read more...
On the heels of the phishing attacks on Twitter and Digg, where all that immediately seemed to be at risk were logon credentials to the social sites, comes a potentially much more insidious problem.Security vendor Trusteer has found a JavaScript bug in all major browsers makes it easier for crooks to steal your login information while you're doing your online banking. It's called "in-session phishing," and what makes it more difficult to detect is that it happens when you're already logged into your banking site. The crooks can hack legitimate websites to create a pop-up window to verify your identity when you're already on the site. Security vendor Trusteer found the JavaScript bug in the biggest... Read more...
A recent discovery of an exploit of the MD5 algorithm used to check the validity of Secure Sockets Layer SSL certificates (The little lock icon on the bottom right of your browser) may put to question whether your online transaction is in fact valid and secure.CNET reports that an international team of researchers will announce this today.They plan to demonstrate how to forge security certificates used by secure Web sites, a process that would allow a sufficiently sophisticated criminal to fool the built-in verification methods used by all modern Web browsers--without the user being alerted that anything was amiss.The problem is unlikely to affect most Internet users in the near future because... Read more...
It appears as if Internet Explorer isn’t the only browser that’s been hit by bugs and security flaws lately. Mozilla and Opera have also released patches and updates for their respective browsers. In addition to updates for its popular Firefox browser, Mozilla recently released updates to its Thunderbird e-mail client and its SeaMonkey application suite. All of these updates are designed to address highly critical security flaws that could expose users' sensitive information. The vulnerabilities apply to earlier versions of Firefox 3, as well as in versions of Firefox 2. One of the most serious vulnerabilities that was repaired could enable attackers to inject malicious URLs into the session... Read more...
All of the three major browsers are given away free to anyone that will take them. But that doesn't make the the competition among them any less ferocious; just the opposite, really. Microsoft's Internet Explorer enjoys about a 75 percent share of users, Mozilla's Firefox 18 percent, and Apple's Safari has 5 percent. Mozilla and Microsoft are battling one another by offering newer versions of their browsers, out in beta now, and Apple is trying to gain market share by surreptitiously bundling Safari with automatic updates for its iTunes music player. Why fight over free stuff? Because many feel the browser will become everything to the user in the future, supplanting the importance of even the... Read more...
Using an old browser?  If you're planning to use PayPal, you might consider updating.PayPal, one of the brands most spoofed in phishing attacks, is working on a plan to block its users from making transactions from Web browsers that don't provide anti-phishing protection.The eBay-owned company, which runs a Web-based payment system that allows the transfer of funds between bank accounts and credit cards, said browsers that do not have support for blocking identity theft-related Web sites or for EV SSL (Extended Validation Secure Sockets Layer) certificates are considered "unsafe" for financial transactions.Honestly, although some may consider PayPal's "threat" draconian, it's in your own... Read more...
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