Microsoft Enables Windows 10 On ARM 64-bit Support For Qualcomm Snapdragon Always Connected PCs

novago 1
When Microsoft and Qualcomm announced that convertible devices powered by Snapdragon 835 processors running Windows 10 would be available to the public, it was a shock to the system. The devices, which features integrated LTE modems, promise runtimes in excess of 20 hours along with good overall performance for your everyday tasks.

However, one of the big downsides to Windows on ARM up to this point is that developers have only had access to the ARM32 SDK. 64-bit apps, which current Snapdragon processors are capable tackling, weren’t supported. That's changing now with the arrival of the ARM64 SDK for Windows 10. Microsoft and Qualcomm made the announcement today at Build 2018.

qualcomm windows 10 3

Developers are now able to create 64-bit ARM apps using Visual Studio 15.8 Preview 1. Developers can create 64-bit apps that are standalone desktop packages or available as Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps in the Windows Store.

"ARM32 packages can currently be submitted to the Store today and 64-bit ARM packages will be accepted to the Store coming soon," writes Qualcomm. "You can also post the Win32 ARM64 version to your web site. 64-bit support should make the Always Connected platform even more powerful for users, but it still doesn’t address other limitations like 

For those looking to purchase a Windows 10 on ARM device, Hewlett-Packard makes available the ENVY x2, which has 4GB of RAM, 128GB of onboard storage a 12.3-inch WUXGA+ display and the requisite Snapdragon 835 processor. HP says that the machine can last up to 22 hours on a charge, which should be good enough for a few days of productivity work for most users. The machine is priced at $999, which is par for the course for a Windows 10 convertible with onboard LTE. 

HP Envy Front

For comparison, a Microsoft Surface Pro with 4GB of RAM, a 128GB SSD and LTE is currently selling for $1,024.


Via:  Qualcomm
Show comments blog comments powered by Disqus