AMD Radeon Vega Frontier Edition Compared Vs NVIDIA Titan Xp, Shipping Now From $999

radeon vega frontier edition
After AMD delivered some “shock and awe” with the release of its Ryzen processors earlier this year, gamers are eagerly anticipating the launch of Vega-based graphics cards. Unfortunately for those that don’t have over $1,000 to plunk down on a single card, our first exposure to Vega comes in the form of the Radeon Vega Frontier Edition.

We can now confirm today that this high-end professional-grade graphics card has a starting price of $999 for the air-cooled version, while its water-cooled sibling is priced at $1,500 (this meshes with earlier reports). As we’ve mentioned previously, the Radeon Vega Frontier Edition has 16GB of HBM2 memory, 483GB/sec of memory bandwidth, 4096 stream processors 13.1 TFLOPS single precision compute performance and 26.2 TFLOPS double precision compute performance.

Both cards are also power-hungry, with the air-cooled card being listed with TDPs of 300W and 375W respectively.

Radeon Vega Frontier Specs

Fortunately, the folks over at PCWorld were given access to a production Radeon Vega Frontier Edition to get a taste of how the card performs, and what we can expect from upcoming Radeon RX Vega gaming cards.

AMD provided an Titan Xp, NVIDIA’s top-of-the-line consumer graphics card, as the foil to its Radeon Vega Frontier Edition. Given that this is a consumer card going up against a professional card, it’s not exactly a fair comparison (the Frontier Edition will be positioned against the Quadro family).

In the limited testing that it was able to witness, the Radeon Vega Frontier Edition was able to outgun the Titan Xp by roughly 50 percent in SolidWorks, while it had a 28 percent advantage in Catia. Its Cinebench performance was also about 14 percent faster than the Titan Xp. It’s a small sample of course, but it shows much promise for Vega going forward.

As for the Radeon RX Vega, we’ll have to wait for wait until late July to get more details on that gamer-centric graphics card.


Via:  PCWorld
Show comments blog comments powered by Disqus