Items tagged with tdi

The finish line is in sight for Volkswagen, and more importantly, diesel owners that were innocently caught up in the German auto giant’s emissions cheating scandal. Although an official settlement offer is expected to be revealed on June 28th, sources close to Volkswagen are revealing that the company will pay $10.2 billion to settle the matter. That $10.2 billion figure includes penalties that Volkswagen will have to pay to the United States environmental agencies, and funds to buyback affected diesel vehicles that can’t be brought into compliance with EPA requirements the company has cheated for years. Customers will also be given a separate cash payment as a goodwill gesture for their inconvenience... Read more...
Volkswagen has come under immense global scrutiny for its willful negligence with regards to cheating emissions regulations with its diesel engines. In the United States alone, over 480,000 Volkswagen- and Audi-branded vehicles have “defeat devices” installed that allow the 2.0-liter TDI engine to pass Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emissions tests with flying colors under controlled testing. However, those same diesel engines emit up to 40 times the level of nitrogen oxides (NOx) that are legally permissible when operating on public roads. When the dust is settled, Volkswagen will likely have to retrofit roughly 11 million diesel vehicles worldwide with revised engine software and/or... Read more...
Well folks, here’s the first of Volkswagen’s actions to “make customers” whole with regards to #DieselGate. In case you need a refresher, Volkswagen admitted to installing a “defeat device” on 2.0-liter four-cylinder diesel engines (under the TDI brand name), allowing them to ace the EPA’s emissions tests. However, under normal driving conditions, the vehicles emitted harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx) up to 40 times greater than what’s legally permissible. In the wake of the scandal, Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn stepped down, the number of affected vehicles swelled to over 11 million worldwide, and resale value for affected TDI vehicles in the U.S. have plummeted (even gasoline-engine Volkswagens... Read more...
Owners of Volkswagen vehicles with the 2.0-liter, four-cylinder turbodiesel (TDI) engine has been in quite a pickle over these past few months. It was revealed that Volkswagen weaseled its way to top-of-the-class fuel economy by cheating EPA emissions tests, affecting nearly 500,000 vehicles sold in the United States and over 11 million worldwide. Since that time, TDI owners have had to sit on their hands as resale values have fallen amid uncertainty concerning how Volkswagen will address the problem. This week, we’re getting a little insight into how Volkswagen will eventually compensate current TDI owners. According to information leaked by dealerships that were informed about the “TDI Goodwill... Read more...
Well, that didn’t take long. Less than a week after a wide-ranging emissions cheating scandal broke involving diesel-engine cars sold in the United States, Martin Winterkorn has announced that he is stepping down from his post as Volkswagen CEO. Although we have a feeling that Winterkorn was kicked out the door with a well-shined wingtip, we’ll just follow the party line that he “resigned.” Earlier this week, Winterkorn attempted to put a brave face on the serious situation, stating, “I personally am deeply sorry that we have broken the trust of our customers and the public. We will cooperate fully with the responsible agencies, with transparency and urgency, to clearly, openly, and completely... Read more...
Things just keep getting worse for Volkswagen, but it only has itself to blame for its newfound troubles. We’ve already told you about the emissions scandal that the German automaker is currently embroiled in, but it looks as though the number of affected vehicles is way more than the 482,000 that were sold in the United States between 2008 and 2015. Volkswagen has confirmed that the software cheat that it used to game the EPA’s emissions tests with its Type EA 189 diesel engines was actually used worldwide. As a result, the United States’ EPA is the least of Volkswagen’s troubles at this point. In total, over 11 million vehicles have this software installed which makes passing emissions test... Read more...
This is just the beginning of what will no doubt be a long, public, and very expensive flogging for German automaker Volkswagen. We reported late last week that the company got caught cheating on U.S. EPA emissions tests by using a “defeat device.” To put it succinctly, VW programed the engine control units (ECU) of its vehicles equipped with 2.0-liter diesel engines to operate more cleanly when it detected that the EPA’s usual battery of emissions tests were being performed. However, under normal driving situations, the vehicles were emitting far more harmful pollutants into the air — in some cases up to 40 times the level of nitrogen oxides (NOx) than what’s permissible. Now that VW’s wide-scale... Read more...
Whoa, Nelly! Volkswagen has gotten caught with its hands in the cookie jar, and its offense is pretty egregious. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has accused the Volkswagen Group of purposefully programming its engine control units (ECU) to detect when federally-mandated emissions tests are being run on vehicle. When laboratory testing is detected, a so-called “defeat device” is triggered that allows the vehicle’s engine to run in a special mode allowing it to pass emissions tests with flying colors. There’s one big problem with this scheme, however; when the vehicle is driven under normal circumstances, it is not operating in a EPA-certified, emission-legal state. In fact, the vehicles... Read more...