Items tagged with Safari

Apple perfected a vertical market when it developed the iPhone, iOS, and the App Store, effectively walling off the garden, as it were. In fact, the only real loophole for evading the standards and practices of the App Store was the Safari Web browser, which of course flung open the doors to the Internet with a single tap. Amazon has now taken that loophole and exploited it in a major way by making its entire 22 million-song MP3 library available for purchase on iOS devices. The Amazon MP3 Store's mobile website for the aforementioned iOS devices has been optimized using HTML5, thus enabling purchases directly from Amazon with the availability of immediate playback using the Amazon Cloud Player... Read more...
Microsoft earlier this week rolled out a streamlined design for its social sidebar feature for Bing, making it easier to find contacts relevant to your search query based on what they've shared, blogged, or tweeted. That same feature has now been ported over to the Safari browser on iPad tablets, including the iPad mini. "Whether you're planning your night out or trying to decide where to vacation next, the sidebar now shows you upfront what friends and experts have shared -- making it easier for iPad users to get stuff done," the Bing Team explained in a blog post. Getting it up and running is a simple affair. You just need to head over to Bing and authenticate your Facebook profile under Sign... Read more...
The software engineers at Apple have been busy updating programs the past several days, including a bug stomping update to iOS 6 that's available to Developers (beta) and, more recently, tweaks to the Safari browser. Safari 6.0.2, available for OS X Lion v10.7.5, OS X Lion Server v10.7.5, and OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.2, addresses a handful of JavaScript vulnerabilities. "Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution," Apple disclosed in a support document regarding the security content of Safari 6.0.2. The update is primarily intended to protect Safari users from drive-by download attacks, not only by addressing JavaScript... Read more...
In an age where data is everything, the constant give-and-take over giving up a certain amount of digital privacy in exchange for free services (Facebook, Google products, etc.) can often veer into murky waters. This week, Stanford researcher Jonathan Mayer spotted Google neck deep in it, and the Wall Street Journal broke the story wide open. Lots of companies all over use cookies to track our Web habits so they can target ads at us. There are ways to block cookies, but Apple’s Safari browser blocks most third-party cookies by default, so users don’t have to mess with it. Google apparently developed a way to secretly get around the blocks: It found a loophole in Safari’s privacy... Read more...
Last week, Mozilla released Firefox 5--just three months after launching Firefox 4. While the company had previously indicated it was moving to a faster release schedule and a whole-number versioning system, the launch caught many users, particularly corporations, off guard. Mozilla claimed that a rapid release schedule would allow it to deliver "new features, performance enhancements, security updates and stability improvements to users faster." In the eight days since FF5 debuted, some 55 percent of FF4 users auto-updated to the new edition. Web tracking data indicates that the number of Firefox 4 users dropped from 16 percent to 7.2 percent, while Firefox 5's market share increased from 0.5... Read more...
The past 18 months have seen a significant evolution in browser graphics. Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Opera have all added support for such standards as OpenCL, HTML5, and Direct2D acceleration. (HTML5 isn't a graphics standard, strictly speaking, but it allows the browser to handle certain activities that once required Flash plugins). Support for WebGL, a browser-friendly derivative of OpenGL, has been added to Firefox and Safari (with Chrome and Opera versions under development). Microsoft, however, has announced it won't be including WebGL support, claiming that the standard is far too insecure to be safely deployed. As it turns out, the software giant has good reason to be concerned. Ever... Read more...
Online data tracker Net Applications published data yesterday that shows IE9 coming on strong, but not necessarily the way Microsoft would like. Adoption trends show that much of IE9's gain was offset by fewer people using Internet Explorer 8. This implies that while customers see the advantages of IE9, they're not turning to Microsoft to provide them with a high-end product.  Microsoft has seen the same reports as everyone else, but prefers a different focus. The company claims that Windows 7 and IE9 fit together like peanut butter and chocolate. A recent blog post by Ryan Gavin repeatedly emphasizes how the IE9 development team "built IE9 to help developers unleash faster and richer web... Read more...
Reducing mobile power consumption has been a top priority of the PC industry for years. Much of the work in this area has focused on hardware, but a recent post from Microsoft's IE blog raises the question of whether or not browser choice can make a difference in battery life*. It's not a question people would've considered for most of the past decade, but the advent of smartphones, hardware-accelerated browsers, and even netbooks have changed the way people prioritize battery life as a must-have feature. Microsoft tested Chrome 10, Firefox 4, IE9, Opera 11, and Safari 5 in the following scenarios: Windows 7 without any browsers running (provides baseline). Browsers navigated to about:blank (power... Read more...
Google launched the latest version of Chrome late last week with support for multiple new features. While Google no longer labels Chrome with a version number or admits such a thing exists, information under the "Stats For Nerds" link in the browser's task manager confirms that this is Chrome 9.0.597.84. There are no default UI changes, at least not when updating from Chrome 8.2. One of the new features Google is introducing with Chrome 9 is disabled by default. It's called Chrome Instant and it extends Google Instant functionality across the entire browser. For those of you who aren't familiar with it, Google Instant refers to the search engine's relatively new ability to return search results... Read more...
A few years ago, a lot of iPhone users were frustrated by Apple's refusal to allow apps into the App Store that duplicated the efforts of apps that were built into iOS. Thankfully, Apple has bent a bit on that over the years, and while there's still no good way to remove the Stocks app from your device, and still no great third-party solution to the Mail app, at least the browsing arena has some competition. The version of Mobile Safari on Apple's iPad is easily one of the most robust mobile browsers in existence. The original Mobile Safari really set the bar for smartphone browsers when introduced on the iPhone. But times have changed, and Mobile Safari doesn't have the commanding lead that... Read more...
Listen up ladies and gents, if you aren't in the habit of changing up your passwords every once in awhile, consider doing so. Not only is it good practice in general, but as it turns out, your browser does a pretty piss-poor job of covering your tracks. Enter Russian software maker ElcomSoft, which just announced a password recovery tool called Internet Password Breaker that purportedly works with Firefox, Safari, Opera, and Chrome. "ElcomSoft Internet Password Breaker instantly retrieves login and password information stored in a variety of applications, including popular email clients and Web browsers," ElcomSoft says. "In addition, cached logins and passwords, pre-filled forms, and AutoComplete... Read more...
One of our primary problems with Safari when we took an in-depth look at it last year was this: no wide-ranging plug-in support as there is with Firefox. For power users who love to browse the Web their own way, using third-party plug-ins to enhance their experience, Safari just never has lived up to Firefox. It's fast, passes the ACID test without issue and is available for both Mac and PC, but the inability to install extensions kept it from becoming one of the best browsers out. This week, Apple has finally updated Safari to a point where it may actually compete with Firefox in the eyes of power users, with version 5.0.1 enabling the Safari Extensions Gallery. The idea here was to give developers... Read more...
According to figures from StatCounter, Google's Chrome Internet browser has unseated Apple Safari for the first time and has become the third most used Internet browser in the United States. Considering the Chrome browser is less than two years old, this is quite the feat. As StatCounter CEO Aodhan Cullen said, "This is quite a coup for Google as they have gone from zero to almost 10 percent of the US market in under two years." In the U.S., Chrome now holds 8.97 percent market share compared to Safari's 8.88 percent. Microsoft's ever-popular Internet Explorer still dominates the Internet browser market in the U.S. with 52%. Firefox follows with 28.5% market share. Worldwide, Chrome passed Safari... Read more...
Last summer, we took a deep dive into Apple's (then) newest Web browser, Safari 4. One of the major problems we had with it was the lack of Extensions support that makes Firefox such a great alternative. It seemed to be a fine browser overall, but it lacked that "extra" that Firefox had and has. This week, Apple introduced something other than the iPhone 4 when they took the wraps off of Safari 5. It's a pretty monumental release for the browser, with the major new addition being Safari Reader. In keeping with Apple's newfound success in the reading/ebook business, this new feature allows users to "read articles on the Web without distraction," mostly by automatically popping the article out... Read more...
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