Items tagged with Kabini

AMD’s socketed “Kabini” Athlon and Sempron APUs, designed for the new AM1 platform, have arrived in the form of the AMD Athlon 5150/5350 and the AMD Sempron 2650/3850. These chips are designed for the mainstream market and promise superb affordability and the kind of performance most users will be happy to have, with Graphics Core Next (GCN) architecture and Jaguar CPU cores. “With quad-core performance and AMD Radeon graphics the AM1 platform is an affordable solution that provides great flexibility due to an infrastructure built to deliver a multitude of options to our end users and system builders,” said AMD corporate VP and general manager, Client Business Unit,... Read more...
AMD announced its new AM1 platform, which consists of dual- and quad-core Kabini APUs that slot into motherboards using the FS1b socket. The idea is that AM1 gives users a powerful but compact and affordable--not to mention upgradable--system. Designed for the mainstream market, Kabini APUs come equipped with Jaguar core architecture and Graphics Core Next (GCN), as well as support for USB 3.0 and SATA 6Gbps, and are destined to land on microATX and miniITX motherboards from all the usual manufacturers, including ASRock, ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, and more. MSI AM1 motherboard “AMD continues our APU technology leadership by introducing the AM1 platform with ‘Socketed Kabini’, an APU... Read more...
Of all the rumors that swirled around Kaveri before the APU debuted last week, one of the more interesting bits was that AMD might debut GDDR5 as a desktop option. GDDR5 isn't bonded in sticks for easy motherboard socketing, and motherboard OEMs were unlikely to be interested in paying to solder 4-8GB of RAM directly on to their own motherboards to support AMD's chip. Such a move would shift the RMA responsibilities for RAM failures back to the board manufacturer. Given the limited upselling capabilities and low market share AMD currently enjoys, it seemed unlikely that Sunnyvale would consider such an option. A deep dive into Kaveri's technical documentation, however, shows that AMD did indeed... Read more...
The story around AMD's upcoming Kaveri continues to evolve, but it's increasingly clear that the chip won't be available for retail purchase this year. If you recall, AMD initially promised that Kaveri would be available during 2013 and even published roadmaps earlier in May that show the chip shipping in the beginning of the fourth quarter. This was always surprising, but AMD adamantly stuck to the published roadmap and the Q4 2013 availability. Or at least, they did. What the company is saying now, in the wake of a rather confused DigiTimes story (more on that in a moment) is that while Kaveri will ship to customers (read: OEMs) in late 2013, it won't actually hit shelves until 2014. Whether... Read more...
Although AMD said in January that it was diving in strong with Windows 8 and was not interested in making chips for Android devices, senior vice president and general manager of global business units at AMD Lisa Su told PCWorld that the company may shift some of its focus to building chips for Google’s two operating systems and is in fact working with developers on Android apps for AMD processors. "We are very committed to Windows 8; we think it's a great operating system, but we also see a market for Android and Chrome developing as well," she said. Kabini-based AMD A6-Series APU It’s not hard to imagine why AMD would consider making chips for Android and Chrome OS devices. For one... Read more...
AMD has been pretty open about discussing certain product in the roadmap. In fact, we've disclosed a number of details regarding the main products we'll be talking about in this article, Kabini, Temash, and Richland over the last few months. It was all the way back at CES that we first showed you Kabini, Temash, and Richland-based products in action in a number of prototype notebooks at tablets from Vizio, HP, Asus and others. And AMD actually talked about the foundation of two these products (Kabini and Temash)-its Jaguar CPU core microarchitecture-at Hot Chips in April of last year. If you're unfamiliar with Kabini and Temash, they are the codenames given to AMD's next-gen, low-power APUs targeted... Read more...
AMD has been pretty open about discussing certain products in the roadmap. In fact, we’ve disclosed a number of details regarding the main products we’ll be talking about in this article--Kabini, Temash, and Richland--over the last few months. It was all the way back at CES that we first showed you Kabini, Temash, and Richland-based products in action in a number of prototype notebooks and tablets from Vizio, HP, Asus and others. And AMD actually talked about the foundation of two of these products (Kabini and Temash)—its Jaguar CPU core microarchitecture—at Hot Chips in April of last year. If you’re unfamiliar with Kabini and Temash, they are the codenames... Read more...
This news has been a long time coming. It's been six years since Intel first began talking about Atom. When it was initially announced, the 45nm, in-order core, based on the Bonnell microarchitecture, was a new product from the ground up. It drew on Intel's expertise in other areas and shared some design elements with the original Pentium, but Atom was its own unique design. And for more than half a decade, Intel has kept that same design. Let's put that in perspective. In the desktop world, we were talking about Windows Vista, Core 2 Duo, and AMD's original Phenom. The Phenom II "Shanghai" refresh was still nine months away, Hector Ruiz was still CEO of AMD. In smartphones, the Cortex-A8 --... Read more...
For the past five years -- and it'll have been nearly six years by the time these new Atom CPUs come to market -- Intel has focused on improving power consumption, improving power consumption, and improving power consumption. Dual-core variants appeared on the desktop in fairly short order, and clock speed nudges have only bumped performance slightly higher. On the one hand, this has paid off tremendously. As someone who spent several weeks with an Intel-powered Gingerbread phone, I can honestly say that yes, you can put an Intel smartphone in your pocket, it works just fine, and battery life is decent. But there's no hiding the fact that Intel's Atom architecture is getting long in the tooth.... Read more...
AMD's upcoming Kabini SoC sits at the heart of the PlayStation 4, the next-generation Xbox 720 (unofficially), and is central to the company's tablet and laptop plans for 2013. It's also a key component of Sunnyvale's new embedded strategy, which is part of what makes the new crop of embedded products AMD announced today rather interesting. The new SoCs run the gamut from 9W - 25W and the majority are quad core. The new embedded chips are as follows: GX-420CA (quad-core, 2.0GHz, Radeon 8400E @ 600MHz, 25W TDP) GX-415GA (quad-core, 1.5GHz, Radeon 8330E @ 500MHz, 15W TDP) GX-217GA (dual-core, 1.65GHz, Radeon 8280E @ 450MHz, 15W TDP) GX-210HA (dual-core, 1.0GHz, Radeon 8210E @ 300MHz, 9W TDP) GX-416RA... Read more...
AMD announced its earnings today, with figures that generally reflected to poor state of the entire PC industry. Normally, this is where I'd delve into those figures and run the numbers. Not this time. AMD's conference call and Q&A session were interesting enough that the company's Q1 performance can be dealt with relatively quickly. The PC market was awful. AMD lost money. The company has enough cash on hand (thanks to selling its HQ in a lease-back arrangement) to make it through the second quarter. Computing solutions revenue really did take a hammering this quarter, falling to $751M (down nearly 40% year-on-year. The company didn't dwell on that fact, but  it's not a sustainable... Read more...
For the past few months, there's been a persistent rumor that AMD would sell its Austin property and lease the building back in a long-term deal that'll net the company some short-term capital. Initially, the transaction was expected to bring in between $180-$200M, but the final value is a bit below that. The company released a statement today stating that the deal will bring it an additional $164 million, which will be included in its first quarter results. AMD has spun the move as in keeping with Sunnyvale's desire to "reduce investments and capital in non-core parts of the business. In 1998, the company sold and currently leases-back its headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif. In 2008, it sold and... Read more...
Fitch, the debt rating agency, evidently wasn't pleased with what it heard during AMD's last conference call. The agency has cut AMD's debt rating from a B to a CCC-. That's the last step above default, and it echoes the agency's skepticism over whether or not AMD can continue as a going concern. The agency writes: The ratings reflect Fitch's expectations that negative free cash flow (FCF) in 2013 will drive cash below AMD's target level and potentially approach the company's minimum operating level. Beyond the near-term, Fitch believes a strong end market recovery and adoption of AMD's new products will be required to preserve cash during the company's multi-year transformation... Fitch believes... Read more...
AMD's fourth quarter results for 2012 are in, and they're as bad as everyone has been expecting. The only good news is that since everyone has been expecting it, the company's stock shouldn't take too hard a hammering. Total revenue for the year was $5.42B, down 17.5% year-on-year. Gross margins fell from 45% to 23% thanks to a much higher cost of sales. AMD ended 2012 with a $1.1B net loss, compared to a $486M income in 2011. Computing Solutions (CPU sales) revenue fell to $4B for the year, down from $5B in 2011. Graphics revenue was down 10% year-on-year, to $1.41B in sales, as opposed to $1.565B for 2011. There are a few glimmers of positive news. Computing solutions revenue was down sharply,... Read more...
The last thing Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) needs right now is to have to deal with continued supplier issues as the year reboots. It's been a tumultuous year for the Sunnyvale chip designer, and to ensure things on the supply side run smoothly, AMD has reportedly tapped Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) to build its upcoming 28nm Temash and Kabini APUs that were unveiled at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) earlier this week. It's another big win for TSMC, which reportedly scored a contract to build A6X chips for Apple just last week. AMD will still lean on Globalfoundries as well, but will no longer put all its chips in one bag, so to speak. According to Fudzilla, Globalfoundries... Read more...
It has been a rough few years for AMD. The company has found itself increasingly behind the eight ball and outmaneuvered, thanks to strong competition from Intel and less-than-stellar performance with recent releases of their A series integrated APUs. At a press event yesterday at CES 2013,  the Sunnyvale-based company focused on demonstrating new product wins and continued execution of its own APU roadmap. New devices shipping soon are courtesy of partnerships Asus, HP, and Vizio. AMD and Vizio announced an expansive partnership, with multiple Vizio systems on display including a new AIO (all-in-one) and ultra-thin notebook design. AMD also showcased their Kabini APU performance against... Read more...
It has been a rough few years for AMD. The company has found itself increasingly behind the eight ball and outmaneuvered, thanks to strong competition from Intel and less-than-stellar performance with recent releases of their A series integrated APUs. At a press event yesterday at CES 2013,  the Sunnyvale-based company focused on demonstrating new product wins and continued execution of its own APU roadmap. New devices shipping soon are courtesy of partnerships Asus, HP, and Vizio. Vizio's hardware was big news at the show, though AMD did talk up partnerships with other companies. The first two companies are familiar names, but Vizio has focused on HDTVs and other consumer electronics up... Read more...
New leaked slides from Intel have shed additional light on how the company's 2014 platforms will challenge ARM products in the netbook/nettop space. At present, the company's efforts in the segment are anchored by Cedar Trail, the 32nm dual-core platform that launched a year ago. To date, all of Intel's platform updates for Atom have focused on lowering power consumption and ramping SoC integration rather than focusing on performance -- but Bay Trail will change that. Bay Trail moves Atom to a quad-core, 22nm, out-of-order design. It significantly accelerates the CPU core with burst modes of up to 2.7GHz, and it'll be the first Atom to feature Intel's own graphics processor instead of a licensed... Read more...
AMD announced late today that it's reached a new wafer supply agreement (WSA) with GlobalFoundries. This is the second time AMD has renegotiated the agreement this year, and while the new arrangement offers Sunnyvale some needed flexibility, it carries further penalties as well. First, a few quick explanations. The WSA governs the purchase and manufacture of microprocessors. AMD agrees to buy a certain number of wafers from GF per quarter and it negotiates payment for those wafers in several different ways. In 2011, AMD and GF agreed that Sunnyvale only had to pay GlobalFoundries for fully functional chips. At the time, GlobalFoundries was having problems ramping Llano. This agreement heavily... Read more...
There's a bit of quoted wisdom that's been making the rounds in tech news, recently. Up until now, I've ignored it, in the hopes that it would die out and go away. Instead, it seems to be showing up with greater frequency. It looks something like this: "Like Intel, AMD was caught flat-footed in recent years with the emergence and fast growth of mobile devices..." This is the sort of sound byte analysis that's often spread by analysts who really ought to know better. The rationale behind it, we'll assume, is the following: Smartphones and tablets are really popular Intel and AMD don't dominate those markets Intel and AMD aren't going to dominate those markets in the next 12 months Therefore, Intel... Read more...
Trusted sources we've spoken to in the semiconductor industry have implied that TSMC is considering a partnership with Apple that would realign the manufacturer's technology roadmap and fundamentally alter the balance of power between the foundry and its other customers. Morris Chang, TSMC's CEO, spoke about the possibility of closer collaboration with its customers in general terms last Friday, but at the time we thought the likelihood of an Apple alliance was unlikely. We've since been given reason to think otherwise. A dedicated alliance with Apple that gives the company first access to 20nm production and/or a dedicated fab could fundamentally redefine the foundry-customer relationship and... Read more...
Trusted sources we've spoken to in the semiconductor industry have implied that TSMC is considering a partnership with Apple that would realign the manufacturer's technology roadmap and fundamentally alter the balance of power between the foundry and its other customers. Morris Chang, TSMC's CEO, spoke about the possibility of closer collaboration with its customers in general terms last Friday, but at the time we thought the likelihood of an Apple alliance was unlikely. We've since been given reason to think otherwise. A dedicated alliance with Apple that gives the company first access to 20nm production and/or a dedicated fab could fundamentally redefine the foundry-customer relationship... Read more...
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