Google Fiber Is Now A San Francisco Treat

GoogleFiberNetworkBox
It looks as though Google Fiber’s next destination is hitting quite close to home, as it was announced today that the high-speed Internet service is coming to San Francisco. Like its announcement for the city of Huntsville, Alabama, Google won’t be using its considerable resources to lay down fiber throughout the city (which is quite a daunting task given the city’s topography) and will instead rely in existing infrastructure to get the job done.

Unfortunately, that will limit the scope of Google Fiber in San Francisco, with Director of Business Operations Michael Slinger writing that the service will come “to some apartments, condos, and affordable housing properties.”

“To date, we’ve focused mostly on building fiber-optic networks from scratch,” Slinger adds. “Now, as Google Fiber grows, we’re looking for more ways to serve cities of different shapes and sizes.

google fiber san francisco

“By using existing fiber to connect some apartments and condos, as we’ve done before, we can bring service to residents more quickly. This approach will allow us to serve a portion of San Francisco, complementing the City’s ongoing efforts to bring abundant, high-speed Internet to the City by the Bay.”

Google Fiber will also provide free gigabit Internet service to "some public and affordable housing properties" within San Francisco and will work in conjunction with Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN) to help bridge the “digital divide” between the haves and the have-nots when it comes to applying for jobs and access content over the Internet. Google has embarked on a similar initiative in Kansas City public housing developments.

To see if you’re one of the lucky few that will be able to sign up for Google Fiber, you can check out the San Francisco landing page right here. As always, Google Fiber charges $70/month for gigabit Internet service alone or $130/month for gigabit Internet and TV service.


Via:  Google Fiber
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