Facebook Encroaches On LinkedIn Turf With Job Openings Feature

Scoot your booty, LinkedIn, and make room for Facebook. The latter is encroaching on the former's territory by testing a new feature that allows administrators of business Pages to post job listings in search of new hires.  Admins can also receive applications from potential job candidates, giving business even more incentive to concentrate their social media efforts on the largest social playground on the planet.

"Based on behavior we've seen on Facebook, where many small businesses post about their job openings on their Page, we're running a test for Page admins to create job posts and receive applications from candidates," a Facebook spokesperson confirmed to TechCrunch after it noticed a new Jobs tab on its Page.

Facebook

Most of the revenue that flows through LinkedIn comes from job seekers and recruiters that pay the service a monthly fee. LinkedIn has long been known as the social network for professionals and has been able to survive in its own bubble outside of Facebook. However, Facebook has been expanding into side categories as of late, including classified ads similar to CraigsList and now job postings.

Job postings on Facebook can contain details such as the job title, how much it pays, and whether it's a full-time or part-time position. It also has distinctive formatting so that job posts stand out from regular content that populates people's News feeds.

People seeking a job can also click on the Jobs tab of a Page to see if they've posted any openings. If one is available, there will be an Apply Now button that brings up a job application that's partially filled in with the job seeker's profile information. It's a subtle convenience, but one that could be a big time saver for people applying to multiple job listings.

The obvious draw here for businesses is the level of exposure—Facebook is sitting pretty with nearly 1.8 billion users compared to 467 million members on LinkedIn.

Via:  TechCrunch
Show comments blog comments powered by Disqus