Lenovo ThinkPad T410 Review

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Lenovo proved at the Consumer Electronics Show in January that it wasn't messing around when it comes to latest generation of notebook technologies. The company has a vast array of options, from tiny to huge, and they span the gamut from casual road warriors to hardcore business users. There's also a machine or two in there for the gaming and multimedia crowd, though you probably wouldn't guess that the ThinkPad T410 was in that category at first glance. This machine, along with the T410s, T510 and W510, received notable upgrades just last month, with Intel's latest Core i5 and Core i7 processors hopping on board to give the classically tough and plain ThinkPad line a much-needed breath of life.



The T410 that we're reviewing today is a ThinkPad through and through. From top to bottom, side to side, there's no mistaking that this is a member of the iconic ThinkPad family. It's matte black, has somewhat bland stylings and is built like a tank. Sounds like a ThinkPad, right? It's the same exterior that loyal Lenovo users have come to know and love, but the choice internal component selection is what really has our interest. Can the ThinkPad T410 maintain its all-business stature while performing at a level acceptable to the multi-media enthusiasts out there?

Those expecting vast changes on the T410 compared to the T400 and T400s that we reviewed will be sorely disappointed. From the external enclosure to the keyboard to the trackpad, almost everything here is stereotypical ThinkPad gear, but the Core i5 CPU (Core i5-540M to be specific) is a definite departure from last year's ThinkPad options. New insides, old outsides--will it be enough to sway existing ThinkPad users to upgrade? And more importantly, will it bring in any new customers to the fold who have thus far resisted the urge to pick up a machine with a blue "Enter" key?  Read on for our entire review to find out.

Lenovo ThinkPad T410 Notebook
Specifications and Features (as tested)
  • Intel Core i5-540M  @ 2.53GHz, 1066MHz FSB; 3MB Cache
  • 4GB of DDR3 RAM (1066MHz)
  • 14.1" LCD (1440x900); LED backlight
  • NVIDIA NVS 3100m (512MB) graphics
  • 320GB (7200RPM) Seagate Momentus 7200.4 Hard Drive
  • 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi
  • 8x DVD dual-layer Optical Drive (CD-R Combo)
  • 2.0 megapixel webcam
  • VGA and DisplayPort
  • USB 2.0 x 4 and eSATA
  • 56k Modem
  • Mini FireWire
  • 34mm ExpressCard Slot
  • Bluetooth 2.1
  • Integrated Gobi 2000 3G with GPS (VZW or AT&T)
  • RJ-45 (Ethernet 10/100/1000)
  • Headphone / Mic Input Jacks
  • SD / MMC / MSPro Multimedia Card Reader
  • Stereo Speakers
  • Gesture-Enabled Multi-Touch Trackpad
  • 5.0 Pounds (with 6-cell battery installed)
  • Removable 6-Cell or 9-Cell Li-ion Battery (Up To 7.8 Claimed Hours of Computing)
  • 13.13" x 9.41" x 1.09"-1.26" (Dimensions)
  • Windows 7 Professional (64-bit)
  • Price (as tested): $1464
  • Price (starting): $999

 




For under $1500, this is one souped-up business machine. The 14.1" form factor keeps it nimble enough for coach class warriors, while the 1440x900 resolution is perfect for playing back movies. It's not exactly the thinnest machine on the block, but the body armor that ThinkPads are known for has to be stuffed somewhere, right?

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Comments

Comments
rapid1 4 years ago

Nice outside strong inside exactly what I would expect from IBM/Lenovo. I like the components especially the GSM/CDMA receiver inside I was wondering when we'd see those hit the market.

InfinityzeN 4 years ago

I've always liked ThinkPads since the IBM days.  Actually owned a couple back before I joined the military.  I think Lenovo is on to something with this design, since it gives the biz user more functionality out of his machine. 

Anything that helps with keeping me enterained while I travel is a plus.  The ability for your work computer to fill that role as well as a multimedia computer is a big plus.

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