3D Monitor Shoot-Out: Acer HN274H & ViewSonic V3D245 - HotHardware

3D Monitor Shoot-Out: Acer HN274H & ViewSonic V3D245

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For controls, the Acer HN274H employs touch-sensitive inputs that are built in to the lower right corner of the bezel. These controls work relatively well, though it wasn't uncommon for a loose cable or other object on our desk to bump them and open the control menu. There are five touch sensitive buttons in all. Each of these controls is illuminated with a dim backlight that makes them easy to find. The Acer HN274H has a physical power button instead of a touch-sensitive power button.

   

   

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On the Acer HN274H, you can press any of the touch-sensitive buttons to open the control menu. From here, you'll see five shortcut options: Empowering, Auto Adjust, Menu, Volume Control, and Input. The Empowering menu provides access to the Acer eColor Management OSD and access to various scenario modes. Using the auto adjustment function, the monitor will set the HPos, VPos, Clock and Focus. As you would expect, Menu opens the OSD menu and Input cycles through the different video sources and displays a message on the top right corner of the screen to let you know which input source is currently selected.


 

Like many monitors we're seeing today, the ViewSonic V3D245 also uses touch-sensitive controls that are built into the lower right bezel. The power button is among these touch-sensitive controls. We didn't have any problem with the control menu appearing accidentally when cords and other desk objects accidentally pressed against these buttons. When we pressed the buttons with our finger, the menus promptly appeared.

    

    

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There are four touch-sensitive control buttons on the ViewSonic V3D245 labeled 1, 2, down, and up. These buttons are not backlit. The rightmost button is power. Interestingly enough, these controls are not located at the extreme edge of the monitor. Rather, the power button is about three inches from the edge of the monitor. ViewSonic includes OSD and Power Lock settings using a combination of these touch sensitive controls.

By pressing the '1' button on the ViewSonic V3D245, you'll open the Main Menu. This button can also be used to exit the control screen and save adjustments. When you open the Main Menu, you'll see options for contrast/brightness, input select, audio adjustments, color adjustments, manual image adjust, setup menu, and more. To select any of the menu items, press the '2' button. Overall, we found the ViewSonic V3D245's control menu very easy to navigate.

Lagom LCD monitor tests
Menus and Options

To test the monitors, we used an EVGA GeForce GTX 570 graphics card and the Lagom LCD monitor test pages found at http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/. The Lagom LCD monitor test pages provide tests for saturation, banding, sharpness, and more.

Contrast on the Acer HN274H was excellent. The Acer HN274H was also sharp and had very good black levels. The white level performance of the Acer HN274H was slightly saturated at the high end. Banding was not an issue on the Acer HN274H. The monitor showed some signs of pixel walk when viewed up close, however. Overall though, most users should be very pleased with the performance of the HN274H.

Contrast and gamma were excellent on the ViewSonic V3D245. Both the black and the white level performance were slightly saturated at the ends of the spectrum. This monitor also had a very slight amount of gradient banding. Similar to the Acer HN274H, we experienced some pixel walk with the V3D245. Viewing angles for the V3D245 are consistent with what we would expect for a TN-based monitor, however.

Although neither the Acer HN274H nor the ViewSonic V3D245 is designed to compete with higher-end IPS panels, both monitors will provide respectable performance for most users.

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No, 3D is *NOT hot. It's garbage. It's a blatant money grab, and a desperate attempt to sell things that aren't needed to people who don't want them.

Here's the reality: Many people will not buy a monitor that's designed for 3D because they understand that they would be paying a lot of extra money for, essentially, a useless "feature."

Of course, the under-endowed (the ones who drive chrome-plated jacked-up 4x4 pickups and are afraid of mud) will buy it. But they'll buy anything, as long as they think it will help them compensate.

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Eh. I'm one of the ones who think 3D is okay, haven't tried it for games though and well... Reading up on the 3D experiences of games it just makes me want one of these things even more.

Moving on, I will say that the ViewSonic does seem better then the Acer; even though it's a smaller screen. Personally if the resolution on a 27 inch screen isn't huge (2560x1600 huge) then what's the purpose of even making a 27 inch monitor in the first place? Plus it does wake up from sleep faster then the Acer and has a somewhat better form factor.

Anyways nice review, glad to see that the Lagom tests are finally getting some mainstream love and I'm glad to see that you reviewed the real-world performance of these monitors as well, you really cover every detail us consumers want to know.

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The monitor I own was designed for 3D and I love it. Response time is impeccable, rich colors and 2D to 3D conversion. I wouldn't say it's a useless feature at all but everyone is entitled to their opinion.

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"Usually as always , in the conclusion there is a winner. I find it hard to believe that two monitors, at two different sizes, from two different companies perform on an equal level. I dont buy it. Theres too many points of differential to set apart each model. What was The Lagom test about? Its just two graphs with no info comparison of each model, what are we supposed to get out of that.? In all the test pages, it was *both monitors* this *Both Monitors* that. I would have liked Paul's take on these two models, Or Matthews. "

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Wheatley:

What was The Lagom test about? Its just two graphs with no info comparison of each model, what are we supposed to get out of that.? In all the test pages, it was *both monitors* this *Both Monitors* that. I would have liked Paul's take on these two models, Or Matthews. "

The Lagom test is like the ultimate test for LCD (and some CRT monitors as well.) and if you look at the bottom of the charts, you'll find that he did post the results from each monitor on the bottom of the images he posted that aren't supposed to be from the monitors.

Wheatley:
I find it hard to believe that two monitors, at two different sizes, from two different companies perform on an equal level. I dont buy it. Theres too many points of differential to set apart each model.

I do buy it since she did look at the monitors, she did test the monitors and well; she observed the monitors, she even judged the real-world performance of each of them... And what differences, even on the introduction pages it at least lists some of the specs and most of them are similar to each other. I just don't know why your focused on the "there can be only one" mentality, why can't they both win?

Side note: this is based on the review, I still think Acer is a piece of crap brand for monitors.

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fantastic review of the two monitors helped me to clear my mind

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