AMD Radeon HD 7770 and 7750 GPU Reviews

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As we’ve mentioned, the Cape Verde GPU powering the Radeon HD 7700 series cards is based on the Graphics Core Next (GCN) architecture and has the same feature set as its higher-end counterpart found on the Radeon HD 7900 series.


AMD Cape Verde GPU Features

Like Tahiti, Cape Verde is comprised of roughly 1.5 billion transistors and is manufactured using TSMC’s advanced 28nm process node. The Cape Verde GPU, however, is outfitted with a maximum of 640 stream processors (to Tahiti’s 2,048) arranged in 10 compute units with 64 stream processors each. Cape Verde also sports 512KB of L2 R/W cache, 16 ROPs, 40 texture units, and a 128-bit GDDR5 memory interface. According to AMD, the die size of the chip is a relatively small 123 square millimeters.

Although Cape Verde is pared down to target more mainstream market segments, it doesn’t skimp on any features. With fewer stream processors, ROPs, and texture units, and a narrower memory interface, performance will be lower than Tahiti, but its features remain unchanged as you can see in the feature comparison above.



           
AMD Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition

The card you see here is the Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition. The Radeon HD 7770 is outfitted with a Cape Verde GPU with all of its functional units intact and enabled. As the full name of this card suggests, the Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition’s GPU is clocked at a cool 1GHz—a first for a reference GPU from AMD. With a 1GHz Cape Verde GPU paired to 1GB of GDDR5 memory clocked at 1.25GHz (4.5Gbps data rate), the Radeon HD 7770 offers up 1.28 TFLOPS of compute performance, with a texture fillrate of 40GT/s, a pixel fillrate of 16 GP/s, and peak memory bandwidth of 72GB/s.

The card is outfitted with a dual-slot cooler, but a relatively short 8.25” PCB. With only an 80W TDP, the Radeon HD 7770 requires only a single 6-pin PCI Express power feed, and its outputs consist of a single HDMI output, two mini-DisplayPort 1.2 outputs, and one Dual-Link DVI output.



                         
AMD Radeon HD 7750

The Radeon HD 7750 has the same output configuration as the Radeon HD 7770, but its Cape Verde GPU is pared down somewhat. The GPU at the heart of the Radeon HD 7750 has one of its compute units disabled, so “only” 512 stream processors and 32 texture units are enabled. The GPU is also clocked lower at 800MHz. The Radeon HD 7750’s differences result in 819 GFLOPS (giga vs. tera) of compute performance, with peak texture and pixel fillrates of 25.6 GT/s and 12.8 GP/s, respectively. The card’s memory, however, is clocked at the very same 1.25GHz as the Radeon HD 7770, so memory bandwidth remains unchanged.

With its pared-down, lower clocked, GPU, the Radeon HD 7750 requires less power than the Radeon HD 7770—55w vs. 80w. As such, the Radeon HD 7750 does not require and additional power feeds. The standard 75 Watt power budget provided by a PEG slot is more than enough. The Radeon HD 7750 also has a much shorter 7” PCB and a single-slot cooler design.
 

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I think that these cards will do well. The x770 cards in particular have been well received in the past and I see no reason for that to change.

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I got a Diamond HD 5770 1GB(my first GPU and still is) When i bought this baby i was just amazed with its performance and price one year ago. I've never had a problem with it since then.

The Radeon HD 7750 looks ugly!

The Radeon HD 7770 looks great + its performance and power consumption just make it a ideal graphics card---I think I'm getting this one soon.

The performance is not a surprise, I expected that from AMD YAYYYYYYYYYYY

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You can't be the prices for what is currently available at that power level. What is sad is to see a new gen product go head to head with a previous gen tech from team green. I expect more from AMD.

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Did you expect the 7770 to beat the 560?

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I'm with Omega.

This, in my opinion, was not a good launch. Right now a 6850/6870 or a GTX 560 are the much better deals in this price bracket (look for the rebates).

I figure that eventually AMD will soon EOL the 68xx series, and then the prices of these cards will drop: I think they did something similar when they launched the 6xxx, because the 5xxx series were still around and were giving much better performance for the same price. Then they will be convincing, esp for those gaming at below 1080p resolutions.

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dejasoul100:

I'm with Omega.

This, in my opinion, was not a good launch. Right now a 6850/6870 or a GTX 560 are the much better deals in this price bracket (look for the rebates).

I figure that eventually AMD will soon EOL the 68xx series, and then the prices of these cards will drop: I think they did something similar when they launched the 6xxx, because the 5xxx series were still around and were giving much better performance for the same price. Then they will be convincing, esp for those gaming at below 1080p resolutions.

 

Agreed, A lot of sites are saying that the 77x0 cards are 90% of the performance of a 6870 for 90% of the price. So technically if it weren't for better power efficiency on the 77x0 cards your best bang for the buck is with the 6850. 

 

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The stated price points are their worst enemy here. (shooting themselves in the foot)

Yes, the cards perform well, and stay fairly cool too, but they are not high end parts and shouldn't be priced that way.

These will be a consideration for me when prices come down a lot.

Until then,..................

"They want to keep them ~a lot more~ than I want to buy them."

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I don't think you can call $159 the high end of the price spectrum, seeing how 580's and 7970's are $500 cards.

I'd say this card would fall into the mid range for AMD's video cards. The x400 and x500 entry level. The x600 being kind of an odd child I'd a call mainstream class, and the x800 series filling the gap between the high end and mid range cards.

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While I thought they were nice cards; there are better deals as other members said. Granted I thought they priced it well and for what they have, it is a good deal but I'm doubting if AMD is losing it in the pricing.

Still, good cards, good review; glad to know they're filling these product tiers as quickly as possible; in case NVIDIA launches the heavily expected onslaught on them. Looks like AMD's still able to put up good GPU's.

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I'm a little confused, shouldn't the comparison be between the 6770 and 7770. The 6870 is the next step up the ladder.

Edit: After a quick look on the egg I get what the rest of you are saying. While the 7770's main competition at it's price point is the 550 TI, it is possible to find a few 6850s and even an off brand 560. Moving up just $10 places you firmly in 6850 territory, and it's hard to believe the average Joe would balk at an extra10 spot. The case for going with a 560 is a little murkier though as they don't show up with regularity until you hit about $185, and I can see some deciding to spend less.

I don't think they would have to make much of a price cut though. Somewhere around $139 - $149 would be just right.

But then again, with the 7770's  performance falling in between a 550TI and a 560, shouldn't it's price also?

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