SATA III SSD Round-Up: OCZ, Corsair, Patriot, Crucial - HotHardware

SATA III SSD Round-Up: OCZ, Corsair, Patriot, Crucial

63 thumbs up

Performance Summary: Three of the drives featured here consistently offered ‘best of class’ performance throughout our testing, the OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS, the Corsair Force GT, and the Patriot Wildfire. Not surprisingly, all three of these drives feature the same SandForce-built controller and synchronous NAND flash memory. These drives offered the highest transfer rates in the majority of tests, and while performance does drop off as the data being used gets more incompressible, performance still remained very high overall.

That is not to say the other drives didn’t perform well. It’s quite the contrary, in fact. All of the drives we tested here offered excellent performance and would be huge upgrade over any standard hard drive. It’s just that some of the drives—namely the three we mentioned--offer higher transfer speeds in most test cases. With that said, users would be hard pressed to “feel” or a see a perceptible difference between any of these drives in typical day-to-day use. We should also point out that the Crucial M4 offered the lowest access times and most consistent performance with highly compressible or incompressible data.

 
So Nice, We Used This Pic Twice...

 Now that we have the performance results covered, it’s time to see how all of these drives stack up in terms of price. The chart posted below lists all of the drives featured here, along with their current street price as of press time, and completely capacity details. Please note, cost per GB was calculated using actual formatted / usable capacities.


* Prices Current As Of 3PM EST, July 12, 2011 

As you can see, the Crucial M4 was by far the least expensive drive looking at its cost per GB. If you want a high capacity drive and work with lots of incompressible data, the M4 is a fine choice. For all out performance, the Corsair Force GT offers a good balance; its cost per GB is lower than the OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS drive despite offering similar performance. For best all out performance, price be damned though, the OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS and Patriot Wildfire drives are the ones to beat. They’re the most expensive, but it shows in the numbers they put up throughout our testing.


Corsair Force GT
OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS
Patriot Wildfire


Crucial M4
OCZ Agility 3
Corsair Force 3 Series

Article Index:

1 2 Next
0
+ -

"Nice round up, good to see Corsair coming out on top, their product investment and development is paying off, RAM, Cases, Power supplies, Coolers now very positive SSD's reviews, how long until they start going in the Motherboard business, maybe partner up with Nvidia and AMD for GPUs?"

-Optimus

0
+ -

I'm always impressed by the numbers put up by SSD's. That increase in speed can really save time over the long run as well as increase productivity. Thanks for the comparisons Marco :)

0
+ -

Thanks for the great review :) The OCZ vertex drives have seemed to come out on top in most reviews of course they are also the most expensive drives in this review. It is pretty impressive how close in performance all these drives were.

0
+ -

Great review, it's nice to see all of these SSD's even though they perform similarly to every other and OCZ really comes out on top...

Still, it's nice you took the time to do this.

0
+ -

Thanks for the look at SSD's again. You guys make it easy for us to keep up with the newest innovations with these timely reviews. (you should send them to us for field testing though)

OCZ seems to be the most affordable when I go to Newegg and shop around there. I just bought a 60GB OCZ Solid III drive that is supposed to do 500 read and 450 write. Plenty fast enough for the i7-2500K Z68 system that it's going into. I should get it on Thursday or Friday and that means that I get to build two systems this weekend,......(dig-it!) One of them is an AMD F1 socket, A8-3850 system.

At $114.00 ($94.99 after the rebate) and free shipping, I had to jump on the deal for that SSD.

While some of these drives put forth better performance numbers than the others, all of them are smokin' fast in my book.


0
+ -

I have been saying since the first review on that OCZ 3 drive came out I will be looking for new drives come Black Friday. I am glad to see so many performing at around the same area with 4/5 being roughly the same, and 1 the crucial not near those number for read or write, but still close enough to see it as a performance part the companies have two options. The first is to lower price, and the second is to make faster ones quickly. In the end we the consumer's win all the way around.

Yes; I have an SSD, but it is only big enough to run as an OS drive. I would love to have games etc on an SSD as well. I do have two SATA 3.0 6MBS plug ins on my board, and 4 SATA 2 ones which my big mechanical drives run on 2 of. I would love to have both an OS, and a Game drive added to those two 750Gb data drives, so I am hoping we see a OCZ Solid 4 or it's like from one if not all of them by November, which would of course tank the prices on these series 3 drives. Then I could grab either a couple 120Gb ones or a 60 Gb OS drive (with performance numbers like these) and either another one or a 120Gb one for games as well as other software which would make good use of a performance drive.

Of course I still remember when I got my 80Gb WD screamer (or what was one back then at it's lofty 7200 rpm data speed's), and at that time thought it was one of the most awesome things period along with my PII 400, and ATI all in wonder pro!

0
+ -

Great review here. I've been contemplating going with a SSD but am concerned about the catastrophic failure rate (supposedly on par with 1-2TB HDD) and more so seen with the SandForce controllers vs. an Intel solution. Is it true that there seems to be a tradeoff between very high speeds and reliability?

As a side note and for those of you interested in ridiculous transfer rates, I needed a quick solution for my 5400rpm that I was trying to do uncompressed video capture with.  Since it was too slow & stuttering, I used the free RAMdisk solution from Dataram to assign a drive letter to a portion of my RAM.  Below are the results including data transfer rates of 2433 MB/s read & 4132 MB/s write!  Of course, it is volatile storage but from a transfer speed perspective and a quantifiable comparison, the numbers are pretty cool.  The numbers compare the RAMdisk solution with my WD VelociRaptor.

0
+ -

I wouldn't say there's a tradeoff between the higher performance drives and reliability. I would say, however, that drives from companies with more resources for qualification and testing (i.e. Intel) do seem to be more reliable according to some reports.

0
+ -

In the news:

Intel Bug Causes Failed SSDs Turn 600GB to 8MB

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-bug-ssd-320-series,13076.html#xtor=RSS-181

I guess it goes back to backup, backup, backup but that downtime w/o the SSD would really stink.

0
+ -

mados123:
I guess it goes back to backup, backup, backup

It always WAS,................and it always will be too.

A failure can occur anywhere with any hardware. I suffered a lightening strike that  knocked out one of my three desktops and didn't phase the other two at all. The one that was hit was utterly destroyed with nothing salvageable in the entire system. It was the brand new wazoo one that I had just built a month before. Insurance paid for the parts and I ended up with better hardware when all was said and done,.....but I lost very little data because of my backup drives.

1 2 Next
Login or Register to Comment
Post a Comment
Username:   Password: