Intel Developer Forum 2010 Day 2 Keynote Coverage - HotHardware

Intel Developer Forum 2010 Day 2 Keynote Coverage

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When Renee James completed her segment of the early morning keynote on Day 2, Intel's Doug Davis took the stage to talk more about Atom and its ecosystem.

   

   

   

Doug announced the new Atom CE 4200 series of products and showed off a number of devices that were powered by the chips, including the WePad we showed you on the previous page, along with the Cicso Cius, which is a portable tablet that can be docked to convert it into a video phone. A hand-held gaming device from a Korean manufacturer was shown off as well, but not many details were given.


   

   

Perhaps the most exciting moment from the morning keynote was the unveiling of a Dell 10.1” convertible tablet built around Atom running Windows 7. During the initial part of the demo, the Dell rep held the device like any other tablet PC and showed off a number of touch-centric applications, but later revealed that the screen could be flipped up, and turned completely around in its bezel, uncovering a keyboard beneath. No details about naming or pricing of the convertible tablet were given, but Dell did say the device is slated for release towards the end of the year.

   

To conclude the keynote, Doug then talked about the types of other devices being worked on that feature Atom and unveiled the Atom E600 series SoC for embedded applications. He showed off a racing motorcycle with an Atom-based monitoring system that sent data back to the pit crew, some digital signage for taxi cabs, and a prototype multi-screen car computer system that handled everything from navigation to media playback; it could even be controlled by a smartphone.

That about wraps it up for our Day 2 coverage.  There is more to come, so stay tuned!

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Lots of cool new toys for us to play with.

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Man what a bunch of smoke and mirrors! they would never be able to get away with that at Siggraph!
 
They really make the animations impressive when they have all the secondary dynamics already calculated and rendered out! If that guy was actually in front of the computer and doing that in real time then I would have been impressed.  At best he was in front of it just compositing multiple animated layers together of the troll. The cloth and Fur dynamics on the Troll and the dress still have to be run through the simulation process even during playback. I can tend to believe that it will be super fast playing back in the view ports. But they make it seem like you are going to be able to create that within the computer with a push of the button?
 
The cloth on the dress just seems like they have the Tension Bias up to high. They could have easily used a denim modifier on the left and a silk setting on the right. That is exactly what it looks like. Doesn't have much to do with the processors, one just may calculate the simulation faster than the other. But when scrolled through and played back they will be the same. Also if you use segment sectioning instead of the now common delaunay tessellation on the mesh, that would be the very noticeable difference to anyone who uses cloth.
 
At least the ridged dynamics makes more sense! With that you can see that one script can run with reaction to the impacts on the bridge. That kind of engine is built into most games, and if it doesn't use sectional animations pre-stored, then it can still use particle effectors built into the grenades. Yet cloth which has multiple directions and forces pushing and pulling in all directions, it is to tricky to do in real time. When we change a leg or arm and move the character around, we always have to update the calculations before we can play it back like that.
 
So I am sure they had a wizard behind the curtain:P
 
I like the Dell Tabletop though!

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