Items tagged with security

Apple would have you believe that it's iPhone devices are locked down tighter than Fort Knox, that its encryption and security schemes are so well implemented that even its own engineers would have trouble hacking a handset. But is that really the case? In a murder investigation involving an actor from The Shield, the Los Angeles Police Department made quick work of hacking an iPhone 5s model that belonged to the victim.Ironically enough, murder suspect Michael Jace is best known for playing a member of the LAPD in the popular FX drama The Shield. He stands accused of killing his wife April Jace... Read more...
Buying into the Internet of Things (IoT) movement that's emerging means putting a great deal of trust into the cloud. It's a double-edged sword, because on the one hand the cloud is key to smart conveniences offered by IoT devices, but it also introduces risk. In case we need reminding of the latter, cybersecurity researchers at the University of Michigan showcased a series of proof-of-concept attacks targeting Samsung's popular SmartThings platform. One of their creations is a lock-pick malware app. What it does is eavesdrop on someone setting up a new PIN code for a door lock and then sends the... Read more...
It's beginning to look a lot like no website on Earth can be trusted with our important data, as attackers are attracted to any service that has a huge number of users. They're even attracted to websites that seek out attractiveness, apparently, as BeautifulPeople.com has had its mammoth user database stolen. Are you unsightly and want revenge? Good news! The database is for sale. As its name implies, BeautifulPeople.com is a site dedicated to hooking up good-looking blokes and gals. That makes it quite an exclusive site, especially thanks to the fact that you have to be approved by the community... Read more...
Someone posted a list to Pastebin containing compromised account credentials belonging to a relatively small number of Spotify users. The list, which is few hundred names deep, contains usernames, passwords, emails, account type, and other details, seemingly suggesting the site has been hacked. The accounts appear to all have been compromised within the past few days, though Spotify contends that it wasn't hacked. Assuming that's true, it would point to a collection of names gathered by other means, such as phishing attempts and poor computing habits, including the use of a single password for... Read more...
In an attempt to kill Saddam Hussein and intimidate the enemy, United States military forces conducted a shock and awe campaign that saw a barrage of bombs dropped on Baghdad and other parts of Iraq over a decade ago. Fast forward to today and the U.S. is still dropping bombs on enemies, albeit instead of explosives they're now of cyber variety.It's not that the U.S. military lacks explosives, but the landscape is different now, and so is the target. The Islamic jihadist militant group known as ISIS conducts much of its effort online, and that's where they're perhaps most vulnerable. So in addition... Read more...
Sometimes you wake up not feeling real confident in yourself or your abilities and it seems as though Google might have been in that sort of mood yesterday. Had you used Google's own Safe Browsing Tool on Tuesday morning to check Google.com, as one reddit user did, you'd have discovered Google reporting its search site as "partially dangerous." Google's tool combs through billions of URLs each day in search of unsafe websites that might be serving up malware. And each day it discovers thousands of new online land mines, "many of which are legitimate websites that have been compromised," Google... Read more...
When Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the NSA's comprehensive spying efforts a few years ago, some might have thought that the agency (along with others) would cool their jets. After all, they were caught red-handed prying into our lives without our knowledge. As recent months have shown, however, the government, and especially the FBI, has no qualm about prying into our mobile devices if the desire is there. The FBI apparently even found a way into iPhones without Apple's help (which Apple has chosen to ignore). Fortunately for us, many software solution providers are capitalizing on consumer... Read more...
If you've ever tried to link someone to a Google Maps URL, you'll undoubtedly understand the benefit of URL shorteners. With them, we can take grossly long URLs and shorten them to a mere fraction of their original length, allowing your Facebook status update to retain a clean look and actually put a few words alongside a URL in a tweet. There's a reason services like Google Maps and Twitter offer their own URL shorteners... they're convenient and useful. According to a new report released out of Cornell Tech, however, we should be showing some concern over the use of URL shorteners. There's a... Read more...
Israeli tech firm Cellebrite has offered to help an Italian father hack into a locked iPhone 6 handset that belonged to his deceased son. It's the same tech firm that assisted the Federal Bureau of Investigation with hacking an iPhone 5c after Apple refused over fears that cracking its own security would leave hundreds of millions of iPhones vulnerable to attack. Cellebrite was sympathetic to a story about Leondardo Fabbretti, who's 13-year-old son Dama, adopted from from Ethopia in 2007, passed away in September 2015 of bone cancer. Fabbretti wrote a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook asking for help... Read more...
It's no secret that law enforcement agencies and governments at large want to have access to our personal data whether we like it or not. Hot on the heels of the FBI managing to bypass security measures that should have protected the data on a terrorist's iPhone 5c, we see that the case is definitely not closed. As many had suspected, now that the floodgates are open, agencies like the FBI are not content to let this one win be the last. This week, draft legislation leaked out of the U.S. Senate that to some highlights the government's ignorance about encryption. Within the bill is an... Read more...
Picking up where the FBI left off against Apple, Senators Richard Burr (R-NC) and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif) are getting ready to introduce a bill that would force companies like Apple and Google to provide "technical assistance" to government authorities trying to access encrypted data on locked devices. "We're still working on finalizing a discussion draft and as a result can’t comment on language in specific versions of the bill," Burr and Feinstein said in a joint statement, according to The Hill. "We’re still in the process of soliciting input from stakeholders and hope to have final language... Read more...
Here's a tip for anyone who owns a smartphone (so pretty much everybody)—don't leave your handset out in the open and unattended, even if you've locked it. Case in point, an online video making the rounds showed how it was possible to bypass an iPhone's passcode using Siri to access the device's contacts and photos. The hack, if you want to call it that, was made possible by a rather odd bug in iOS 9.3.1. For it to work, Siri must have access to the iPhone owner's Twitter account. The handset must also support Force Touch, limiting the vulnerability to iPhone 6s and iPhone 6S Plus models. And the... Read more...
A prosecutor in Arkansas will get an assist from the Federal Bureau of Investigation in a murder trial where key pieces of evidence may be contained in a pair of Apple devices. Having just recently thwarted the security on an iPhone 5c that belonged to one of the San Bernardino shooters, the FBI has agreed to help prosecuting attorney Cody Hiland with breaking into an iPhone and iPod that belonged to the two alleged teenagers assailants.The case involves the killing of Robert and Patricia Cogdell, both murdered at their home in Conway, a town that sits half an hour north of Little Rock. Authorities... Read more...
The FBI dropped its case against Apple yesterday claiming it had extracted the contents of the now infamous iPhone 5c model that belonged to Syed Farook, the terrorist involved in the San Bernardino shooting, with the assistance of a third-party. It's as much a win for Apple as it is for the FBI, though instead of celebrating, Apple released a statement saying the matter should never have went to court to begin with. "From the beginning, we objected to the FBI's demand that Apple build a backdoor into the iPhone because we believed it was wrong and would set a dangerous precedent. As a result of... Read more...
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