Items tagged with Chrome OS

Google released an update for Chrome OS late last week. Chromebook users have had the weekend to form an opinion of the new Launcher, which has Google Now integration and improved typed and voice search functionality. So far, the reaction to Chrome OS 42 is mixed. Comments posted on Google’s Chrome Releases blog suggest that some Chrome users aren’t seeing Google Now cards in the new Launcher. “I concur with other posters who complained they can’t find Google Now,” user Jim Thompson commented on Google’s blog post. “I still get cards in Notifications and have no access to Google Now from the launcher.”... Read more...
Chromebooks based on Google’s Chrome OS are making some inroads in the notebook market — especially in education — but the same can’t be said for two other form-factors of Chrome OS-based computers: the Chromebox and the Chromebase. Acer hopes to at least shift some momentum towards Chromebases (all-in-one Chrome OS desktops) with the introduction of the aptly named Acer Chromebase. The focal point of the Acer Chromebase is of course its massive 21.5-inch display, which packs in Full HD resolution (1080p). Acer also says that this is the first Chromebase to come with a touch display (10-point multi-touch).... Read more...
Many of us are no doubt frustrated with our televisions, convinced that they simply aren't contributing enough to earn their keep, acting only as passive entertainment and information delivery conduits and occasionally as defacto babysitters for our kids (or defacto — and never argumentative — friends for ourselves). We feel they should be doing more to warrant the prime real estate they occupy in our living rooms, dens, playrooms, bedrooms, and kitchens...right? Thankfully, the new Asus Chromebit will be available in the summer of 2015 to help rectify the situation, ready to transform our TVs... Read more...
Microsoft is pulling out all the stops when it comes to battling an insurgency from Google with Chrome OS. Microsoft has resorted to offering Windows 8.1 with Bing free to OEMs that provide low-cost laptops and desktops to consumers as a way of stopping Google dead in its tracks. The latest assault on Chrome OS (and Chromeboxes) is coming in the form of a tiny little machine from Hewlett-Packard called the Stream mini (which measures 5.73” x 5.70” x 2.06”). The Stream mini packs comes with an Intel Celeron 2957U processor, 2GB of RAM, Intel integrated graphics, and a 32GB SATA-based SSD. HP has... Read more...
Google has a history of trying things that may or may not have long-term success in the market, and creating Chrome OS for the Chromebook was certainly one of those things. Somewhat amazingly, the Chromebook has managed to gain enough traction to hang around for future iterations, as seen with Samsung's newly revised Chromebooks 2 launched this week. The refreshed 11.6-inch model has an Intel Celeron 2 (N2840) processor within (2.58GHz), 2GB of system memory, a 16GB eMMC storag echip and a 1366x768 resolution display. The unit also offers up to nine hours of battery life, anti-reflective technology... Read more...
In a move to supplement its list of applications available on its Chromebooks, Google has announced a partnership with Adobe on its official website. The new partnership will bring Adobe’s Creative Cloud onto Chromebooks starting with a streaming version of Photoshop. Google revealed that the new feature will be available first to U.S.-based Adobe education customers as part of a beta. Named Project Photoshop Streaming, is exclusive to consumers who have a paid Creative Cloud membership. Those who apply will receive a response within three to four weeks. “This streaming version of Photoshop... Read more...
Google last week announced the availability of four Android apps on Chrome OS as the result of a projected called App Runtime for Chrome (beta). That was pretty exciting, but what if you could run more than just four Android apps on Chrome OS? And what if you could run them on other operating systems as well? A developer by the name of "Vladikoff" had that same thought, so he went and built a runtime called ARChon (App Runtime for Chrome) that allows Android to spread its wings. The initial release of ARChon was hamstrung by several limitations, such as limited apps support and only working on... Read more...
Whether it's because consumers simply didn't take to Windows 8 the way Microsoft hoped or because there's a genuine like for Chrome OS, Chromebooks have grown to become super popular, especially among students who need a cheap, basic machine for surfing the web. In a way, Chromebooks are the modern day netbooks, and they're about to get a whole lot more functional with the addition of select Android apps. "Chromebooks were designed to keep up with you on the go—they’re thin and light, have long battery lives, resume instantly, and are easy to use. Today, we're making Chromebooks even... Read more...
Leave it to Google's Chrome team to keep the smiles coming, even from a web browser. Chrome itself seems to be updated on a near-nightly basis, with patches and performance tweaks being the norm. That said, a slew of new features have cropped up over the past few months, and the latest Chrome beta includes yet another that sounds almost too good to be true. While sites that auto-play audio have dropped dramatically, they still exist. The latest Chrome beta adds an obvious visual cue up in the tab bar so that you can glance up and see immediately which site is to blame for that screeching coming... Read more...
Worried about what your kids are doing online with their Chromebooks? Your only option at this point is to hover their shoulders each and every time they fire it up, but starting soon, you'll be able to implement certain restrictions as a "Supervised User." By allowing for multiple accounts, Google is basically baking in parental controls. We all know that using parental controls isn't a substitute for good parenting or physically checking up on your child's online behavior from time to time, but it's a starting point, and one that's badly needed considering how popular Chromebooks are becoming.... Read more...
If the only thing stopping you from picking up a Chromebook is the lack of support for Microsoft Word and/or Excel, you'll be happy to know that there's an update to the developer channel build of Chrome OS that adds the ability to edit both types of files on an experimental basis. Chromium evangelist François Beaufort first noticed the capability, which appears in the Chromium Code Review simply as "Improved QuickOffice editing about:flag." To access the feature, your Chrome OS device has to be on the developer channel, If it is, just type "chrome://flags" (without the quotes) into the... Read more...
Earlier this year, Google did something almost ground-breaking when it introduced the Chromebook Pixel. Sure, the Chromebook line as a whole has existed for years, but the entire premise of such a range of notebooks revolved around only a couple of design goals. One of those was accessibility, and almost by default, the other was affordability. The original Chromebooks were priced at $500 or less -- in some cases, far less. The reason seemed obvious: Chrome OS was a great operating system for those who did little more than browse the Web and connect to cloud-based services such as Evernote, but... Read more...
Earlier this year, Google did something almost ground-breaking when it introduced the Chromebook Pixel. Sure, the Chromebook line as a whole has existed for a few years, but the entire premise of such a range of notebooks revolved around only a couple of design goals. One of those was accessibility, and almost by default, the other was affordability. The original Chromebooks were priced at $500 or less -- in some cases, far less. The reason seemed obvious: Chrome OS was a great operating system for those who did little more than browse the Web and connect to cloud-based services such as Evernote,... Read more...
Since their respective launches, it's been oft-speculated that neither Chrome OS or Windows RT have fared too well in the market, and with an updated report from NetMarketShare, we can now add some substance to that. Net Applications, which monitors a number of large websites for usage statistics and then publishes the results through NetMarketShare, began monitoring for both of the aforementioned OSes just a week ago. At the conclusion of that week, it was found that Chrome OS usage was about 2/100th of 1%, or 0.0002% - too low to even register among the rest of the results. Given the fact that... Read more...
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