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Top Windows 7 Features That Vista Should Have Had
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Date: Oct 22, 2009
Section:Misc
Author: Shawn Oliver
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Windows: A Brief Retrospective
This week may be as big a week in the company's history as Microsoft has ever had. We know, that's a pretty bold statement, but there's a lot of evidence to back that up. Microsoft has been drowning in negative press and negative vibes for most of Vista's life; it has tried for years to spit-shine the image of its "Wow!-inducing" operating system, and by and large, it has failed.



In order to really understand the importance of Windows 7, we've got to go back in time a bit and take the whole of Microsoft's work into account. For those of you old enough to remember Y2K and that underground bunker you built in order to stay safe, you're probably old enough to remember Windows ME. It's almost impossible to argue that ME was Microsoft's biggest gaffe in terms of operating systems; ME barely lasted on the market, and Windows XP ushered in what the company's real next generation OS should've been. It was a monumental leap from Windows 98; driver issues suddenly vanished (for the most part), productivity shot up and consumers/corporations alike flocked to upgrade.


Windows ME: "Oh, The Horror!"

Windows XP lived a good, long life, and with only a few exceptions, the press and consumers alike seemed to love it. Microsoft was riding high, and it only expected to ride even higher than the launch of Vista. The company spent inordinate amounts of money promoting it in every nook and crannie it could find, and the whole world was soon under the impression that the "Wow!" was for real. Microsoft encouraged us all to set our expectations high, and we did. The world did. But when Vista launched, folks were baffled--the wow that was promised was nowhere to be found, or if it was found, it was watered-down. Vista felt like Windows XP, only with more glossy and system requirements that were downright painful at first. Upgrading older machines was a challenge, and many simply couldn't handle the stress of Vista. Look at the modern day netbook, for example. Netbooks weren't even a sector when Vista arrived, and yet all netbooks today ship with either Linux or Windows XP, because manufacturers know that Vista is too resource intensive.


Windows XP: "Old Faithful"

Honestly, Windows 7 would have to do little more than "be the Vista that Vista should have been" in order to receive praise, but Microsoft made sure to do more than that. Windows 7 reminds us a lot of Windows XP in terms of what was anticipated compared to what was/is being delivered. We won't go so far as to say that Vista is the ME of the modern day, but it's close.


Windows Vista: "What Could've Been..."

Join us on the next page to see the ten greatest features of Windows 7 that should've been in Vista, and learn how those ten features will make your life that much better if you're currently pondering the upgrade.
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Top 10 Windows 7 Features Missing From Vista


1. Reasonable System Requirements

Today, this sounds like such a no-brainer, but Vista really got this one wrong. People were duly excited about upgrading their OS to something that was prettier, more flashy and more intuitive, but they weren't banking on buying an entirely new system in order to do so. The cost of Vista was tough enough to swallow; the cost of Vista plus the cost of a machine capable of running Vista was too much for some. Microsoft put off a lot of potential customers by demanding such high-end hardware to run its OS, and to compound the issue, many end-users felt that the upgrade wasn't even worth it once they'd splurged on a new PC.


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Windows 7's hardware requirements are the exact same as Vista's hardware requirements. The difference? Windows 7 is coming out in late 2009, whereas Windows Vista came out in early 2007. Windows 7 enables older machines (particularly those strong enough to handle Vista) to run beautifully on a new platform.  Even netbooks and Windows XP-based machines are seeing smooth performance on Win7, though Vista is still sluggish. The bottom line? Windows 7 does more with what you give it, and it functions smoothly with older hardware that has less to offer it.

2. Streamlined Code/Speed
We haven't read through each and every line of code that makes up Windows 7, but we can tell you this much just from using it: the developers spent an awful lot of time cleaning up background activity in Windows 7 compared to Vista. In Vista, it always felt like too much was going on underneath, as if wheels were turning unnecessarily. This led to the OS being far too resource intensive, as it couldn't do the things it needed to do in a highly efficient fashion.


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Win7, on the other hand, is buttery smooth from bootup to shut down. Transitions are seamless, application launching is quick and everything just seems to fit together better. If Vista was a first or second draft, Windows 7 is the final copy after being edited four or five times over.

3. Trust
Okay, so maybe trust is awkward--but is Ritalin any more politically correct? Windows Vista seemed to question your every move, and while we know its intentions were (it wouldn't want you venturing to some virus-installed website, for example), the incessant nagging grew tiresome very quickly. Vista wanted to check, double-check and sometimes triple-check every single move you made, and while Windows 7 still asks for your permission before doing an awful lot of tasks, it's not nearly as persistent.


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4. Aero Peek
Vista was plenty advanced enough to include Aero Peek, but instead, the only thing Aero was good for in Vista was adding a bit of sheen to your desktop while consuming 500MB of RAM in the process. Aero Peek is a Windows 7 feature that allows users to hover over application/window groupings in the task bar in order to see what's currently going on. Let's say you've got three IE8 windows, two Windows Explorer windows and four Adobe Reader windows open on the desktop. If you roll over the IE8 icon in the task bar, your three IE8 windows pop-up above it; hover over the one you want to maximize, and that windows automatically takes center stage over everything else. What once was chaos is now calm and understandable.


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5. Aero Shake
Here's yet another Windows 7 feature that sounds simple--almost too simple to matter--yet makes a huge difference in daily work. Let's re-insert yourself into that chaotic desktop situation mentioned above. What if you'd just like to have one single window on the desktop? In Vista, you had to either show the desktop and then click on the window you wanted to appear alone, or you had to manually minimize each and every window except your preferred one. What a pain. Aero Shake lets you grab a window, shake your mouse like a crazy person, and watch all of the other windows shrink down into the task bar. It's the Windows equivalent of a stress reliever ball, but it actually helps your productivity.


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6. Aero Snap
In case you haven't noticed, Windows 7 puts Aero to good use. Rather than just making your windows, desktop and transitions look "cooler," Aero Snap is another great tool for instantly re-arranging your desktop into how you'd like it. Using this is simple; you just grab a window, ram it into the left or right side, and immediately that window resizes to fill precisely half of your desktop space (on whichever side you slammed it into). Do the same process to another window on the opposite side, and bam, you've just maximized your screen space while viewing two documents/web pages/etc. Oh, and if you want to get really crazy, you can slam a window into the top of your desktop space in order to maximize that document to full screen. Brilliant.


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7. A Smart Task bar
The task bar in Windows Vista was simply a shiny version of the task bar in Windows XP. Sure, it worked, but it didn't innovate. And look, you're paying a lot of money for this new OS--surely some innovation should come standard, right? Windows 7's task bar enables users to pin app launchers and documents to the bar, and it even lets you pin web pages and specific shortcuts on each main icon. As we alluded to earlier, the new task bar also stacks up documents in a certain application (such as three Firefox windows or four Adobe Reader documents) in order to pop-up the available windows when moused over rather than crowding the screen with all of them. Simple, subtle and perfect.


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8. A Windows Media Center That Likes Media
For casual users of Windows Media Center, the one in Windows Vista is probably "good enough." But for those with multiple TV tuners, a Netflix subscription and a library of movies that runs a few hundred titles deep, there were loads of issues to deal with. We won't get into the nuts and bolts of it all, but suffice it to say, the Windows Media Center within Windows 7 runs a whole lot smoother, feels a lot less like a shoe-horned addition to the OS and is actually built to handle extenders such as the Xbox 360. If Microsoft ever wanted to be taken seriously in the HTPC arena, it had to nail its own media playing software; thankfully, it did. Win7's version boasts a slicker interface, faster transitions and integration with far more web content portals. Oh, and did we mention the extra long list of compatible HTPC hardware? Chances are, your TV tuner, sound card and optical drive will work without any extra drivers on Windows 7, and simplicity is always a good thing.


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9. Search That Works
Microsoft really, really fine tuned searching in Windows 7, and considering that an operating system is a big, scary world, it makes perfect sense. You'll probably find yourself search for one thing or another on a daily basis, so wouldn't it be nice if your OS was ready at all times to help you find it? Vista's search was universally a pain. It oftentimes wouldn't search in the places you needed it to, and many times it would look right over the file you were trying to find. Worst of all, it acted like it needed you to give it "a head start" by telling in where in the drive to search. Windows 7, on the other hand, allows you to simply hit the Windows key and start typing; your text automatically goes into a search field and the gears start turning as soon as you mash the first hey. Windows 7 is far better at indexing material to search, and we've yet to type in something that it couldn't locate.


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10. Multi-touch Support
We know multi-touch wasn't at the height of popularity in 2007, but it wasn't unheard of. Microsoft's own Surface paved the way for simpler, consumer-oriented multi-touch applications, so we're confident the boys and girls in Redmond know a thing or two about it. Vista simply wasn't built for touch, which is baffling given the amount of Tablet PCs on the market (particularly in enterprise) and the amount of touch-panel PCs that are shipping. Windows 7 rights that wrong, however, added a deep level of multi-touch support throughout the OS. We recently reviewed a multi-touch Lenovo notebook, and the interaction between Win7 and the touch-friendly panel was amazing. Take a look below.



All told, we think Windows 7 is an outstanding operating system, and it really improves on the areas that Vista was weak. Rather than trying to re-invent the wheel, Microsoft has done what Apple did with its most recent OS, 'Snow Leopard.' Windows 7 is what Vista should have been. It's Windows Vista done right. Thankfully for us, it's Windows Vista done right and more, as the ten features we listed are nowhere to be found within the prior system.


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Windows 7 could still stand to be improved, sure. For starters, there shouldn't be so many OS options; having a half dozen difference Win7 retail boxes is only bound to confuse consumers, though we are thrilled to know that some netbooks will soon start shipping with the OS. If you've been looking for more from your OS while using Vista, Windows 7 is worth a look. If you've been holding tight to Windows XP after hearing horror stories of Vista, you can finally sleep easy knowing that this upgrade won't ruin your life. Of course, Microsoft doesn't make it super easy to migrate all of your files and settings from XP to Win7, but with a little extra effort (think Windows 7 Easy Transfer Wizard)  it's not all that painful.


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Will Windows 7 finally get people smiling when discussing Microsoft's operating systems again? Based on our testing, we'd say yes--but you have to wonder, is Microsoft benefiting here from Vista being so problematic? Either way, we're excited about the new features and streamlined nature of the new OS, and we're betting future service packs have even more of that "wow" in store that we've been waiting for since early '07.



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