Items tagged with Wolfdale

One other additional tidbit of information from Intel's recent conference call offers some tantalizing rumors about the upcoming Core i7 architecture, codenamed Sandy Bridge. Officially, Intel isn't expected to launch SB until the end of Q4, but the chip is ramping well enough that Santa Clara might opt to pull the launch forward slightly and ship for revenue earlier. For those of you who aren't up on Intel's latest codenames, Sandy Bridge is a "tock" in Intel's Tick-Tock model. Intel splits its processor releases along these lines; a 'tick' refers to the launch of a new process technology, a 'tock'... Read more...
Just in case you hopped right down to the news and missed the fresh link at the top of the page, we’re writing to let you all know that we have just posted a new article here at HotHardware in which we evaluate the features and performance of Intel’s recently released, Wolfdale-based Core 2 Duo E8500 processor.  The E8500 uses Intel’s 45nm Penryn derived Wolfdale core, with a 3.16GHz clock speed, 6MB of L2 cache, and support for SSEE4.1.  Overall, even in its stock configuration this processor was a strong performer, while consuming less power than Intel’s previous generation 65nm products. ... Read more...
Intel fans have been patiently waiting for the company to release their lineup of refreshed Core 2 Duo and Quad products. Intel started hyping these revised components late last year, and they were expected to hit the market in January of this year. While Intel technically hit that date with the release of one 45nm component, it was the ultra-expensive Core 2 Extreme QX9650, which sells for over $1,000. Not really the type of component that everyone can get their hands on. Nevertheless, the current generation of 65nm Core 2 products continued to fall in price, and with no real competition... Read more...
A little over a year ago at the Intel Developers forum in San Francisco, Intel allowed a small group of members of the technology press to run benchmarks on a pre-configured Conroe-based system, well before processors based on the Conroe core had begun to ship. This was a new strategy for Intel, but a welcomed one in our opinion as it gave enthusiasts a chance to glean some real information about an upcoming product well before it actually hit store shelves.  Intel continued to employ this strategy in the weeks leading up to the launch of the Kentsfield core. Once again, in... Read more...