Items tagged with Time

Pebble is launching a new Kickstarter campaign, and the star this time around is its new Pebble Time smartwatch. In a nascent market that is seeing the rise of LCD and OLED-powered smartwatches running the Android Wear operating system (the much-hyped Apple Watch is still two months away), the Pebble Time forgoes those power-hungry displays (well, power-hungry when we’re talking about the tiny batteries included on smartwatches) in favor of a color e-paper display. The use of the e-paper allows for the use of [relatively] vibrant colors while retaining the seven-day battery life that Pebble users... Read more...
There's absolutely no shame in finishing second, especially when you're going up against the President of the United States. To wit, Time Magazine named Tim Cook the runner-up to its Person of the Year, giving the ultimate prize to President Barack Obama. According to Time, Cook is the first CEO of Apple to come to power "without blood on his hands." Prior to his stepping into Steve Jobs' former role, a CEO would be named when somebody got fired, Cook explained to Time. Cook, however, was handpicked by Jobs to replace him, and it appears Apple is in good hands moving forward. Since Cook took over,... Read more...
The Internet has been said to be just one big series of tubes. Accurate? In fact, yes, it is. But data doesn't just flow around the globe without a medium to travel through, and most users take the undersea cabling necessary to make it happen for granted. Now, thanks to a little company called Facebook, we're hearing a bit more about it. This week, TIME dotCom (out of Malaysia) has entered into a construction and maintenance agreement of the Asia Pacific Gateway (APG) submarine cable system connecting Malaysia to Korea and Japan. The APG is a 10,000 km international fibre optic cable system that... Read more...
The news magazine Time and Apple announced a deal today that will give print subscribers full access to the iPad versions of its magazines for free, including publications like Fortune, Sports Illustrated, and Time itself. The deal is a potent demonstration of how disappointed most publications have been over the growth of iPad subscriptions. Apple's announcement of the feature last year sparked a great deal of initial interest, but the majority of companies are unhappy with the 70/30 revenue split Apple demands. Subscriber data has proved to be another flash point. Under the terms Apple offers,... Read more...
There's a lot more to history and archeology than just uncovering the past. Sometimes recreating the past in our present time is the best way to understand how people lived thousands of years ago. One such project, the Rome Reborn project of the University of Virginia's Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, seeks to digitally rebuild the city of Rome "as it might have appeared at the height of its urban development in the time of Constantine the Great in A.D. 320."The first version of the Rome Reborn project was ten years in the making and was completed only last year. It included... Read more...
It's no secret that most radio talk shows have a slight delay before a caller's audio reaches the air. The obvious reason: to make sure no "f-bombs" reach the sensitive ears of the public --- or the FCC. Well, Microsoft has been awarded a patent that might eliminate the need for that delay. The patent, 7437290, is for "Automatic censorship of audio data for broadcast" was first filed in 2004. Here's how it's described: An input audio data stream comprising speech is processed by an automatic censoring filter in either a real-time mode, or a batch mode, producing censored speech that has been altered... Read more...
How do you roll out computer access to 1.8 million students at $70 per seat? The answer: Virtualization. The Indian state of Andhra Pradesh is undertaking a "massive 5,000-school educational computing initiative" to build computer labs and give computer access to almost two million Indian children. But instead of requiring one computer per user, the system being put in place, supplied by NComputing, will allow up to seven users simultaneous access to a single computer.   Credit: NComputingGet those images of a bunch of kids crowded around a single keyboard and display out of your heads--that's... Read more...
In our continuing coverage of technologies that are enabling convergence and mobility, we have news from Motorola that they're serious in their commitment to capitalizing on convergence and connectivity in the multimedia living room of tomorrow.  Dubbed the au BOX (case sensitive, please...), Motorola plans to enable customers to take their multimedia content with them on their cell phone.  KDDI, a major mobile carrier in Japan plans to offer the au BOX service first which will allow subscribers to tap into their personal music, video and image libraries, while on the road. ... Read more...
Pundits argue that the computer is quickly on its way to becoming the primary source of delivering audio-visual entertainment. Others will argue that it's already happened. With over 12 billion videos watched online in the U.S. during the month of May, its hard to argue against the ubiquity of the PC as the king of media. To further this claim, market research company, Integrated Media Measurement Inc. (IMMI), has released a study that claims that almost 20 percent of primetime "episodic" television shows are watched online.This number is an average representing IMMI's measurement of "3,000 teens... Read more...
Federal regulators continue to come down on hard on corporate executives they believe are involved with misrepresenting investors and analysts.  The latest group to get collared were 8 executives from AOL Time Warner who are being charged with inflating the company’s online advertising revenue by more than $1 billion between 2000 and 2002.“Four of the executives have agreed to settle the civil charges brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission by paying a total of roughly $8 million in fines and returning allegedly ill-gotten gains.  They are David Colburn, Eric Keller, Jay Rappaport and... Read more...
Your Digital Video Recorder might not have found Sarah Conner yet, but it seems to be responsible for the disappearance of six million primetime TV viewers since last May. Some of the miserable ratings of this year's crop of primetime shows could be laid at the feet of the writer's strike, but that really can't explain the whole number. It's starting to dawn on the TV industry that there's no such thing as primetime anymore. ...the more significant shift can’t be blamed on the strike. In the past television season, there has been a sharp increase in time-shifting. Some of the six million are still... Read more...
Here's a way to peruse the globe while getting regional updates.New York Times "placemarks" will appear on maps where there's relevant news, and showing the New York Times layer in the software will show a window with a month's worth of headlines, Google's LatLong blog said.Google spokeswoman Kate Hurowitz said the company is open to partnerships with other media outlets and that extending such a feature to Google Maps--a much more widely used service than the Google Earth software--"would be a logical progression," though the company has nothing to announce right now. Google's interest in extending... Read more...
Apple patched QuickTime not once, but an amazing eleven times on Wednesday. Some of the patches were to improve stability and compatibility, but there were also some exploits which were found and patched.“It's at least the sixth time Apple has patched QuickTime since October, as researchers and hackers have been closely examining media players for vulnerabilities. As operating systems have become more secure, vulnerabilities in applications have become a favored route to break into a PC.”Apple is notoriously coy with information regarding the specific exploits, but the running rumor is that most... Read more...
We're getting to be nags here at HotHardware news about this facet of computer upgrades, but once again, it's proven to be true: Bigger monitors make people more productive.  Researchers at the University of Utah tested how quickly people performed tasks like editing a document and copying numbers between spreadsheets while using different computer configurations: one with an 18-inch monitor, one with a 24-inch monitor and with two 20-inch monitors. Their finding: People using the 24-inch screen completed the tasks 52% faster than people who used the 18-inch monitor; people who used the two... Read more...
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