Items tagged with Science

Any way you look at it, today's storage technologies are impressive. We can hold a tiny memory card no larger than our finger nails that can fit thousands of images, songs, and documents, and potentially hundreds of videos. We even just wrote about a new consumer hard drive from Seagate that packs 10 terabytes inside of its frame. Today, as consumers, finding enough storage isn't really a major issue, but that could change in the future. Given some breakthrough technologies we've heard about in recent months, though, that could definitely change in the future. Just earlier this month, we reported... Read more...
Either for work or just for fun, science can be one of the most rewarding and exciting fields to delve into. This is something that Google apparently has a passion for as well, as the company has released a very cool new science app for Android devices. Called Science Journal, this app will let anyone with an interest in science create and manage their own projects. The app is made even more useful by the fact that it interacts with Google's science initiative called Making & Science, and based on its name, it's not that hard to figure out what it's all about. Users of the app can easily browse... Read more...
While some fail to reach their goal of creating something truly amazing, a team of researchers at UC Irvine seems to have done the impossible. While working to create better batteries for our electronics, these researchers managed to develop a makeshift battery with a life so long, it'd always outlive the device it's in. To accomplish this, the researchers make use of gold nanowires to store electricity, in lieu of using traditional lithium. The reason batteries in our devices die after a while (and the reason so many are rightfully miffed when a smartphone doesn't have a swappable battery) is... Read more...
Last month HotHardware reported on how Ohio-based Nikola Labs wowed the crowd at the Disrupt conference — and the Internet — by presenting a smartphone case. Of course, it didn't trot out one of your typical keep-the-dings-off smartphone cases, though, but one that can capture the 90 percent of waste energy pumped out by a typical smartphone in the form of radio frequencies (RF), and convert that energy into DC power that can be channeled back into the encased device to provide it with a 30% energy boost.  Science or science-fiction? Too good to be true?... Read more...
The consortium governing the planning and construction of the Giant Magellan Telescope — which will be the worlds largest optical telescope when completed — has approved its $500 million assembly phase, which is roughly half of the project's $1 billion overall budget. The massive celestial-gazing instrument and its support facility will be built in Chile, on the Las Campanas Peak in the Andes mountain range. A seven-mirror telescope spanning 25.5 meters, or nearly 84 feet, the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) will focus six times the amount of light that is harnessed by the biggest optical telescopes... Read more...
Mobile phones charged with energy taken out of thin air. What sounds like a modern take on a very old magic trick is actually the Unique Selling Proposition of a smartphone case developed by Nikola Labs and presented for the first time on Monday at the TechCrunch Disrupt event taking place this week in New York City (the Ohio-based company was selected to pitch to the crowd "after being selected by the TechCrunch editorial team and the audience").  According to its developers, the Nikola Labs case is able to use its proprietary energy harvesting circuit to capture the 90 percent of waste... Read more...
Leaving the realm of science fiction behind, the super-fast charging mobile phone is inching its way ever more closer to science-fact. As reported in Stanford Magazine in advance of publication this week in the journal Nature, researchers at Stanford University have developed a high-performance aluminum-ion battery that can recharge in about a minute and do so thousands of times without significant loss of capacity. And along with being faster to charge and more durable, the new battery is also much safer than the lithium-ion batteries so many of us currently carry around these days in the mobile... Read more...
Scientists are getting a new tool for sharing information from the publisher of Nature. Macmillan is making all articles available to subscribers in a digital format and is encouraging them to share articles with colleagues both in and out of its subscriber network. The publisher will also let news organizations link to its articles (so their readers can enjoy them without a subscription), potentially introducing the scientific journal to new audiences.Macmillan is making it easy to share Nature articles. Image credit: Macmillan“We exist to serve the information needs of researchers, to help them... Read more...
Google is responsible for a lot of things that have made our lives better. Better search, better email, and one impressive mobile operating system. But beyond its commercial success sits a research department that's doing fascinating stuff. Project Loon is helping rural areas around the globe receive Internet for the first time, and it appears that Google's fixation on health is going to extend well beyond a simple app. The company's Google X division has announced a project whereby researchers are building nanoparticles that "combine a magnetic material with antibodies or proteins that can attach... Read more...
It's no secret that caffeine can be addictive... we've known it for years. But have you ever wondered why your body may feel an urge to make another pot of joe or grab a soda? Believe it or not, the science behind it is rather simple, and definitely interesting. An addiction to something implies that you "need" to intake it often, and while it is about as simple a drug as they come, caffeine is in fact a drug. Many who consume lots of caffeine usually experience withdrawals after going without it for a while, much the same as someone who's trying to kick the smoking habit will, though it goes without... Read more...
If you’ve been secretly wondering whether you’re a double-crossing secret agent, you’ll be excited (or disheartened) to know that the technology to fiddle with memories really is under development. Scientists at MIT have successfully programmed a hapless mouse to remember receiving an electric shock from a situation in which it wasn’t actually shocked. Scientists are able to change memories in mice. Image credit: Rama (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-2.0-fr], via Wikimedia Commons If you’re thinking that the mouse didn’t get shocked as part of the experiment, stop reading... Read more...
Every now and then, it's easy to forget that certain items sure could use a dash of innovation. Every eight or so years, our entertainment + gaming consoles are completely overhauled. Even now, automobiles are evolving from gas to electric. But what about the flashlight? Sure, there have been minor advances, but when is the last time you saw a flashlight innovation making the evening news? Now, a 15-year old girl has been selected into the finals of the Google Science Fair, and she's shining nearly as brightly as the hollow flashlight project that has brought her here. Ann Makosinski, a 10th-grader,... Read more...
At 83-years-old, Buzz Aldrin, one of the first men ever to set foot on the moon (second behind only Neil Armstrong), hasn't lost a step, nor has his passion for space exploration wavered in the years since that day in 1969. Just the opposite, the retired United States Air Force pilot and famous astronaut thinks its high time mankind pulls up its britches and sets out to colonize Mars. Ask him why he thinks we should send astronauts to the red planet, as BBC News reporter Theo Leggett did, and he'll tell you, "Why did the pilgrims on the Mayflower set out to open up the New World? Because it's in... Read more...
DARPA is known for doing some pretty outlandish things, partly in the world of technology and partly in the world of military. And often, those sectors cross paths. DARPA's Adaptable Sensor System (ADAPT) program has launched this week, aiming to transform how unattended sensors are developed for the military by using an original design manufacturer (ODM) process similar to that of the commercial smartphone industry. The goal is to develop low-cost, rapidly updatable intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) sensors in less than a year, a marked improvement to the current three-to-eight... Read more...
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