Items tagged with retro

Some three decades later, what's old is new again with the Commodore Amiga 2000 HD making an unlikely comeback. Well, sort of. Just over a week before Halloween, some lucky expo attendee stumbled upon a never touched and fully functioning Amiga system powered by a Motorola 68000 processor running at all of 7.16MHz. Oddly enough, his rare find wasn't even the first decades old virgin Amiga system unearthed this month! Around three weeks ago, a Facebook user posted pictures of a non-HD Amiga 2000 that was still in its retail packaging to the Commodore Amiga Facebook group. The system was sold as... Read more...
Hush little baby, don't say a word. And never mind that noise you heard. Unless, of course, it's an array of screaming floppy disk drives cranking out the Metallica classic Enter Sandman. Everyone is going to have soundtracks that bring forth a deluge of memories from the past. Some might consider the Star Wars theme to be the ultimate for that. For metal fans in the 90s, Enter Sandman is going to be right on up there for many. Heck, it even managed to drive Megadeth's Dave Mustaine to begin Sweating Bullets a year after its release. However, this version of Sandman, may just top that for some... Read more...
Longing for those days of yesteryear, questing and conquering in Defender of The Crown? Or perhaps you miss that fast-paced platform action, snuffing out Aliens in Another World? You're not alone; Glenn had the itch too. Commodore Amiga Facebook group member Glenn, (and we'll leave it at that so you're not tempted to ring him up for a retro therapy session), was fortunate enough to stumble upon a machine that could quite literally take him back in time, circa 1985, maybe 87ish, otherwise known as the glory days of Commodore's Amiga personal computer. Rocking a Motorola 68000 processor, 256kB of... Read more...
One common complaint in the twenty-first century is that nothing is built to last. Even complex, expensive computers seem to have a relatively short shelf-life nowadays. One computer in a small auto repair shop in Gdansk, Poland, however, has survived for the last twenty-five years against all odds. In January a photo was taken by Facebook user Bartek for the page Retrokomp/Loaderror. The picture recently resurfaced on Commodore USA’s Facebook page. The computer claiming victory here is a Commodore C64C that has been balancing driveshafts non-stop for a quarter of a century. The C64C looks like... Read more...
Although working at a publication like HotHardware often involves tight deadlines and countless hours of benchmarking, product photography, and writing, plenty of fun activities get thrown into the mix as well. Case in point--I came home from the Intel Developers Forum this past week to a pair of boxes that were begging to be torn open in an unboxing video. So, I that’s what I did. And what I found inside the boxes is the kind of stuff tech-enthusiasts drool over. Not only was there some killer hardware to ogle, but it was presented in a very unique way...check this out... If you stay on top of... Read more...
There's a reason the mantra "History Repeats Itself" continues to live on. For as much as things change, a lot of things end up staying the same, and all bets are off when it comes to pure nostalgia. LG is looking to tap a certain segment of consumers who may have aged a bit, started a family of their own, and now has the disposable income to both satisfy the desires of owning modern technology, while satisfying the yearnings of "the good ole' days." The company's newest HDTV is quite the looker, complete with a retro-inspired case that is part Jetsons, and part high-tech. The 32LN630R looks much... Read more...
For whatever reason, the camera market has truly been embracing high fashion. While many of our gadgets seem to be assembled with no real eye on beauty, Fujifilm's camera department has been going the opposite way. The company has just released the XF1 point-and-shoot camera, with a bit of retro flair and an f/1.8 lens that should make nighttime shooting a bit more enjoyable. The camera touts a 4x manual zoom, a 2/3" 12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor, and it's available in three motifs: a dimpled synthetic black leather, a smooth synthetic tan leather and a synthetic red leather. Other specs include... Read more...
This isn't new news, and it shouldn't be a shock to historians, but every now and then, it's really good to reach back and grab some perspective. The SSD or HDD that you're probably using now will look like a relic in just a decade, but look at what a 5MB hard drive looked like in 1956. IBM's 305 RAMAC was considered to be the first "super" computer with an HDD, and the HDD module alone weighed over a ton and wouldn't hold enough information to send a single JPG image from most DSLRs. Wow.... Read more...
Here's an idea that brings back memories of coin-operated kiosks of one sort of another that you used to see in booths in restaurants - and still do in retro-style ones - a coin-operated wi-fi kiosk.First, you’ve got to dig deep and slot some coins into it, after which the kiosk will print out a ticket that details your temporary Internet access account details. You then use this information to gain web access through whatever enabled gadget you like, whether it be an Eee PC or an iPhone. Of course, once your time has elapsed then the connection automatically ends. At which point, you’ll have to... Read more...
While buying on the Internet is a) easy, b) fast, c) frequently less expensive, it can also be frustrating, particularly when there is a customer service issue or a return to be made.  Granted, some companies such as Amazon.com make returns easy, by making the entire process of a return as easy as the buying process, and even providing free return shipping if the error is theirs. However, sometimes you really, really need to communicate with a human.  Email, while faster than snail-mail, is simply too slow for these types of issues.  This problem has even led to the creation of some websites that... Read more...
Good afternoon folks! It's been a while since we posted any links to the BIOS Optimization Guide over at Adrian's Rojak Pot, but he's been constantly adding new content to the ever growing list of BIOS features. Also in the news, well future news anyway, is the release of Quake 4 this friday. I'll breakout a "Woot!" for that! Wireless Industry Leaders Promote Next-Generation Wi-Fi Technology to Accelerate IEEE Standards Development   The Enhanced Wireless Consortium has developed a specification that is designed to enable consumers to enjoy new levels of wireless performance, coverage... Read more...
Good evening HotHardware fans!  We've got something a little different for you all tonight. Rob spent some time gaming with a few classic Coleco at-home arcade units, and has put together a fun retrospective of some of the most popular units, including Pac-Man, Donkey Kong, Galaxian and Frogger. If you'd like to take a walk down memory lane, and have a little fun while you're at it, check out Rob's article right here...... Read more...
After our previous foray into some old-school arcade action with the X-Arcade Dual Joystick and MAME, we got to thinking about the early years of home-style gaming.  We're talking about back in the late 70's, a time when the USSR was still our Cold War adversary, and the thought of a PC in every household was still a fantasy.  While today's generation drools over the heavenly graphics and stellar gameplay that a Doom 3 or FarCry provide, back then we didn't have much more interaction than moving paddles up and down on the edge of the screen in Pong.  Mattel Electronics released some... Read more...
  By, Marco Chiappetta April 8, 2004 Almost four years ago, we took at a look at Asetek's original version of the Vapochill designed for the Pentium III, and we came away impressed.  The enclosure was a basic beige full-tower, which by today's standards isn't very exciting. The installation was tedious, but we were able to take a Slot 1 933MHz Pentium III all the way up to 1.16GHz, using an Abit CX6 motherboard.  No small feat considering it was June of 2000 and Intel was still using a .18 micron manufacturing process... Read more...