Items tagged with Raspberry-Pi

With vehicle makers focusing on making our future travel autonomous, a major concern arises: is it going to be safe and secure? If companies expect people to trust their lives with their technology, it goes without saying that it must be bullet-proof. There can be no compromises. Uber is a company that understands this very well, as it recently beefed-up its security brain-power by hiring two people who've proven that all of the technology lacing our vehicles could prove to be a serious detriment if it's insecure. It's a good thing that autonomous vehicles haven't littered the market quite... Read more...
Give credit to the Raspberry Pi Foundation for helping to popularize the tiny and affordable PC movement that has makers and programmers of all skill levels tinkering with do-it-yourself projects. Millions of boards later, others have jumped into the category, including CHIP, the world's first $9 computer and one that could give Raspberry Pi a run for its money. In response, the price of a previous generation Raspberry Pi Model B+ has been cut to $25. That's a $10 price cut compared to its original $35 price tag. It's a long overdue one. Officially, the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that production... Read more...
Many wonderful things can be and have been said about the Raspberry Pi — it's adroitness as a programming learning tool, its remarkably low cost-of-entry, the strong and varied community that has developed around it, the user creativity it inspires, its oh-so-oh-so-cool factor — but one thing never said is that it provides a clean, well-contained user computing experience. That's because, well, it doesn't. The truth is that the typical Raspberry Pi system is precisely the opposite, presenting as a chaotic jumble of cables, cords, wires, USB hubs, peripheral devices, and various... Read more...
Where DIY PC boards are concerned, Raspberry Pi was an undeniable spearhead. As soon as the original unit came out, a flurry of competitors came to the surface, each with their own little twist. That's great for the consumer, but not great for RPi, which persisted for a couple of years without releasing a substantial update. Well, with the just-released RPi 2, we're brought back up to speed (no pun), and there's more than one reason to get excited: RPi 2 isn't just faster, it also brings Windows 10 support. Oh - and because of the class of device this is, a copy of Windows 10 will be free. On the... Read more...
Two years ago saw the release of the Raspberry Pi Model B, a $35 computer board running Linux, and in the meantime we’ve also seen the $25 Model A emerge. Now the Raspberry Pi Model B+ is here, and the team is calling it “the final evolution of the original Rasperry Pi”. Although the B+ has the same ARM-based BCM2835 processor, 512MB RAM, and $35 price tag as the Model B, there are several key improvements, including two additional USB 2.0 ports (for a total of 4 four), a slicker push-push microSD slot that replaces the old friction-fit slot, and a 40-pin GPIO header that replaces... Read more...
An enterprising tinkerer named David Hunt built a “smartphone” from a Raspberry Pi and off-the-shelf parts. Appropriately, he named the contraption the PiPhone, and it actually functions. Hunt used an Adafruit touchscreen as a display and popped in a SIM900 GSM/GPRS module to enable phone calls, send texts, and use data. There’s a 2500mAh LiPo battery and a DC-DC boost converter as well as a few cables, connectors, and switches, too. Yes, the PiPhone is hideous (someone please 3D print a case for this thing), and yes, you can acquire a much better phone from any provider for less... Read more...
We love a good mod around here, and this one is priceless: Using a Rasperry Pi, a pair of hacked-up video glasses, a tiny wireless keyboard, and some 3D-printed parts, you can create your own Google Glass-like spectacles that will mount on virtually any sunglasses or prescription frames. Basically, you can pull apart the video glasses and extract some key components and then fit them into some 3D-printed pieces, the designs for which are free from Thingiverse. Poof, there are your high-tech specs. To power them--and this is the ungraceful part--you need to put together a pocket-sized Raspberry... Read more...
The adorably awesome $35 Raspberry Pi has proven to be a fun, flexible, and relatively powerful tool for hackers, tinkerers, and makers, but the platform has been lacking a modern web browser. That’s changing, as the Raspberry Pi team, in collaboration with Collabora, have developed an “up-to-date”, HTML5-capable web browser. The idea is that it’s a port of Web (the web browser formerly known as Epiphany), and it will offer multi-tab features, ARMv6-optimized 2D rendering, and accelerated image and HTML5 video decoding. Collectively, the teams have already finished the porting... Read more...
The Raspberry Pi can be used for all sorts of applications, including sweet mini desktop builds, and it can also be used as a personal cloud server with arkOS. The arkOS project has been crowdsourcing funds, and it has already pushed past its $45,000 goal with 5 days to go in the campaign. The open source arkOS platform, simply put, is designed to let you easily host your own websites, email, web-based apps, and personal cloud. There’s a GUI interface called Genesis that should make setting up, configuring, and managing everything fairly simple, so you don’t have to be familiar with... Read more...
Although Intel is Chipzilla, the company can’t help but extend its reach just a bit into the exciting and growing world of DIY makers and hobbyists. Intel announced its Galileo development board, a microcontroller that’s compatible with Arduino software and uses the new Quark X1000 SoC processor (400MHz, 32-bit, Pentium-class, single- core and thread) that Intel announced at the IDF 2013 keynote. The board makes use of Intel’s architecture to make it easy to develop for Windows, Mac, and Linux, but it’s also completely open hardware. If this sounds similar to the low-cost... Read more...
Anything that helps those of all ages learn a new skill without spending a lot of cash is great; anything that helps people learn a skill such as coding is extraordinary. Such is Coder, a project developed by a small group of Googlers that offers a simple way to turn a Raspberry Pi into a little web server and also build apps on it, within a browser. Coder relies on standard languages such as HTML, CSS, and Javascript and lets users “build real web stuff”. It’s an open source project, so it’s totally free, and all you need to get going is a Raspberry Pi, power... Read more...
Intel’s Open Source Technology Center, in conjunction with CircuitCo, is developing a low-cost, embedded-type motherboard based on the Intel Atom processor called the MinnowBoard. The whole affair is very charming (complete with a cartoon minnow logo), and it’s being marketed as a sort of fun, hobbyist-friendly board. (Sound like the Raspberry Pi?) Although it uses Intel architecture, the hardware is open, and it runs the open source Angstrom Linux distro. Specs include an Intel Atom E640 (dual-core, 1GHz) with an Intel integrated Intel Graphics Media Accelerator GMA 600,... Read more...
What’s a fellow to do when the campus Beowulf cluster isn’t quite ideal for his Electrical and Computer Engineering dissertation project? Build one of his own, of course. Boise State’s Joshua Kiepert did just that, and he used 32 Raspberry Pi boards to do it. Kiepert’s dissertation is focused on “developing a novel data sharing system for wireless sensor networks to facilitate in-network collaborative processing of sensor data”, and his testing method required a distributed simulation over a LAN, and the Beowulf cluster in Boise State’s “MetaGeek... Read more...
So far, the tiny and inexpensive Raspberry Pi computer has been about as successful as anyone could have hoped for. More than a million units have been sold so far, there’s a dedicated app store, and hobbyists and developers have been making and porting games and the like. The latest fun consists of a DOS emulator for the Raspberry Pi that enables you to play older PC games such as Duke Nukem 3D, Doom, Little Big Adventure, and more. Coder Patrick Alto based the emulator on one he built for the Nintendo DS, and the latest release offers fixes including better support for USB devices such... Read more...
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