Items tagged with patent troll

Patent trolls. We all love to hate these despicable companies that often don’t produce a single product, but use their vague patents to sue companies with deep pockets. When companies like Google, Microsoft, Apple, and Samsung aren’t in court suing each other into submission, patent trolls are nipping at their heels by taking away precious resources (namely legal manpower) and slowly siphoning their bank accounts. It seems as though everyone hates patent trolls, well everyone except for juries in the Eastern District of Texas (over a 1/4 of patent troll cases roll though this district) and trial... Read more...
While Apple and Samsung carry a lot of baggage relating to their legal past and current competitive environment, they are also somewhat cordial when it comes to a manufacturer-supplier relationship. Samsung provides components for Apple products ranging from displays to NAND flash chips; the company also recently secured a contract to produce the A9 processor that will go in Apple’s next generation iPhone. The strangely intertwined relationship took an even stranger turn late last week, and it involves a patent troll that we’ve talked about previously here on HotHardware. In late February, a jury... Read more...
Boston University is a prestigous, research-oriented university that can claim a number of famous alumni. Unfortunately, one of the classes it's added in recent months is aimed at a demographic that's been under increasing fire in the United States -- the humble patent troll. BU sued Samsung in April, Amazon in June, and as of yesterday, has added Apple to the mix. The non-profit university has asked that each company be banned from selling pretty much anything, and wants a share of the profits on devices that have been sold. The patent in question is 5,686,738 (the '738 patent) which describes... Read more...
You rarely hear politicians talk about patent reform, but perhaps it's high time the topic merits some discussion. The alternative is to leave the system alone and let businesses pay the price, even if they can't afford it. According to researchers at Boston University School of Law, the cost for businesses paying royalties to patent owners has risen fourfold since 2005, and it's the so-called "patent trolls" that are running the system. The study found that companies in 2011 paid a cumulative $29 billion in expenses associated with nearly 6,000 infringement claims filed by non-practicing patent... Read more...
Righthaven's dream of corporate enrichment via frivolous lawsuits is in tatters, and the company's erstwhile partners are abandoning ship. The new CEO of MediaNews Group, John Paton, announced this week that its partnership with Righthaven would expire at the end of the month and that the company has no plans to renew it. “The issues about copyright are real,” Paton told Wired.com in a telephone interview. “But the idea that you would hire someone on an — essentially — success fee to run around and sue people at will who may or may not have infringed as a way of protecting... Read more...
A recent complaint filed against Apple by the unknown company Operating System Solutions alleges that the company's method of fast-booting OS X violates a patent. At first glance, the lawsuit seems no different than other patent troll cases that litter the legal landscape--but there are a few oddities that hint at a larger purpose to the filling. For one thing. the patent holder--Operating System Solutions--is an absolute unknown. Even patent trolls typically have websites and a modest online presence; OSS appears to lack even these items. Furthermore, the patent in question was originally granted... Read more...
Phone maker HTC is taking heat from investors over its decision to purchase S3 Graphics. Citigroup cut its rating on HTC citing corporate governance concerns. There's a definite connection between the two--S3 is partly owned by HTC Chairwoman Cher Wang, a fact that raises concerns over just how necessary the deal was. Normally, HTC might have been expected to simply license S3's technology, as opposed to buying the company outright. HTC has responded to the allegations, telling Bloomberg: "This is a transaction involving related parties, but it’s certainly not the case that we could never... Read more...
The International Trade Commission has announced its findings in the NVIDIA/Rambus patent infringement lawsuit and it's not the sort of ruling Team Green would've preferred. The commission found NVIDIA to be in violation of three Rambus patents. The trade panel also granted an injunction Rambus had requested, which theoretically prevents NVIDIA and the various companies attached to the lawsuit (Asus, HP, Palit, and MSI among others) from selling products that contain the infringing IP. This last bit sounds more ominous than it actually is; there's a 60-day window before the injunction takes effect... Read more...