Items tagged with iCloud

It seems that Apple may have a complicated relationship with device user privacy. Russian digital forensics firm Elcomsoft has recently discovered that iPhone users’ call histories are being sent to Apple’s servers. A user’s call history can be sent to Apple’s servers if iCloud is enabled. The data will include phone numbers, dates, times, and duration of phones calls as well as missed and bypassed calls. Facetime and third-party apps such as Skype, WhatsApp, and Viber, and that use Apple CallKit to make the calls, are also saved in iCloud. Apple retains this information for no longer than four... Read more...
This isn't a perfect analogy, but imagine if Burger King approached McDonald's about storing and managing its inventory of beef patties, buns, condiments, cups, napkins, and so forth. That's sort of what's happening between Apple and Google, with the former becoming a customer of the latter's cloud platform.Apparently this was a deal Apple inked with Google last year, and since that time it's been able to reduce its reliance on Amazon Web Services to a large degree for its iCloud service. Apple hasn't completely severed its ties with Amazon, but at this point it's entrusting Google's cloud platform... Read more...
Apple users with massive libraries of songs now have a much higher ceiling when it comes to the number of tracks they're allowed to upload. As was previously promised just before Apple Music launched in late June, iTunes Match and Apple Music's scan-and-match feature now support match limits of up to 100,000 tracks.Previously Apple set the match limit at 25,000 songs, which for the average Joe is probably way more than enough. But for music lovers who've spent years amassing tracks, this is a big upgrade that should bring about a few smiles. Also, perhaps a few frowns from Android users -- Apple's... Read more...
If there’s one thing that I’ve learned when it comes to taking any computing device in for service, it’s to back it up beforehand “just in case.” There’s no telling what service technicians will have to do with your device or what kind of mishaps could happen in the process, so it’s better to be safe than sorry. However, it appears that at least one British man didn’t use enough caution when he took his malfunctioning iPhone in to be serviced at a local Apple Store. Deric White claims the Apple Geniuses never asked him if he had backed up his iPhone 5, and took it upon themselves to reset the iPhone,... Read more...
Jan Souček, a security researcher from Prague, has uncovered a vulnerability in the security of the iOS Mail application that nefarious types can deploy against users of the app to gain access to their iCloud passwords.    The method published by Souček illustrates how an email can be sent to the hapless victim that uses HTML code that mimics the iCloud login pop-up window upon receipt. Then, after said victim has inadvertently tapped their iCloud password into the window's Password field and clicked OK, an email is sent back to the sender with that critical information. Specifically,... Read more...
It’s long been said that Apple’s efforts to tackle “the cloud” have often come up short. Apple has seemingly struggled to get a firm grip on cloud data starting with iTools, which subsequently morphed into .Mac, MobileMe, and to its current incarnation as iCloud. In the past, Apple has rented server capacity from various vendors -- such as Amazon and Microsoft -- to support its cloud services like iCloud. In addition, Apple has taken the easy (but not always efficient) approach of using off-the-shelf hardware like Cisco switches and HP servers in its growing army of data centers. However, Apple... Read more...
An update to OS X today brings with it Apple’s new Photos app, which is meant to give users better tools for accessing and sorting their photos. Photos is also more integrated with iCloud, which is good news if you’ve been meaning to get your photos off your vulnerable hard drive and into the cloud. If your 5GB of free iCloud space is already nearly tapped, however, you may soon be exploring Apple’s paid storage expansion options. Image credit: AppleThe Photos app is free, of course. It replaces Aperture and iPhoto and is similar in design to the Photos app for iOS. But it has many more features... Read more...
The bigger they are the harder they fall, and you could almost hear a thud when Apple's web stores and various services went down on Wednesday. You could certainly hear the groans as the outage loomed on, effectively halting online sales from Apple's iTunes Store, iBooks Store, App Store, and Mac App Store, ultimately costing the Cupertino outfit millions of dollars in lost app revenue. It all started around 2 AM Pacific on March 11, less than two full days after Apple showed off its shiny new toys, including its much anticipated Apple Watch and new MacBook systems. The outage lasted about 12 hours,... Read more...
Under CEO Satya Nadella, Microsoft has shown a surprising amount of “love” for its competitors. It has provided high-functioning Office apps to iOS and Android users well ahead of solutions for its own Windows Phone platform. It has even partnered with Dropbox, which goes head-to-head with Microsoft’s own OneDrive online cloud storage solution. Today, Microsoft has even more love to share, as it is taking steps to offer more robust cloud storage integration into its Office apps. That starts today with the addition of updated iOS Office apps that allow users to “open, edit and save documents from... Read more...
There's a fine line to balance when it comes to providing users with a comprehensive backup service and providing that service in a manner that fundamentally compromises the security of the people it's supposed to be protecting. According to security researcher Jeffrey Paul, iCloud has thoroughly breached that barrier thanks to unwelcome changes baked into OS X 10.10 (Yosemite). Here's the problem: Prior to now, if you were working in an application -- even a basic application like TextEdit (the Mac version of Notepad), and you quit the application, the machine would automatically save your documents... Read more...
Apple recently posted a security bulletin alerting iCloud users to the presence of "intermittent organized network attacks using insecure certificates to obtain user information," and though the company didn't publicly point a finger at China, several reports suggested that's where they're coming from. In response to the attacks, Apple CEO Tim Cook booked a flight to China today to try and resolve the issue. Citing China's state-run Xinhua News Agency, PCWorld says that Cook met with Chinese Vice Premier Ma Kai in Beijing to talk about improving cooperation in the telecommunication industry, as... Read more...
It's a little bit awkward when you're flipping through photos in front of a group and come upon that one sexy pose in skimpy clothing you forgot was on there, but imagine if someone hacked your phone and uploaded all your private photos for the entire world to see. Jennifer Lawrence and several other celebrities don't need to imagine because a flaw in Apple's Find My iPhone service may have allowed hackers to do just that. According to various reports, someone posted a Python script on Github for a password brute force proof of concept to Apple's iCloud service. Brute force attacks use a script... Read more...
Apple has worked hard to deliver synchronized data across all of your iDevices with iCloud, but for those who aren’t so keen on trusting the cloud with their data, there’s a device coming called the iStick that allows you to transfer files locally. Yes, it’s a USB flash drive (nothing interesting there)--however, it also has an integrated Lightning connector (ah, there we go). iStick HYPER (by Sanho), the company behind the iStick, says that it’s currently the only USB flash drive with Apple’s proprietary connector, and it works with iPhones, iPads, and iPod touch... Read more...
Australian authorities are advising Apple device owners who have iCloud accounts to change their passwords due to a recent hacking/hijacking outbreak, and now it appears to be spreading to the U.S. as well. The attacks involve a hacker logging into an iCloud account and using the lost device feature to lock users out. Once the device is locked, the hacker sends a message to the device owner demanding a ransom, typically between $50 and $100, to unlock the device. The attacks seemed to initially only affect Apple device owners living in Australia, though Apple users living in the U.S. have started... Read more...
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