Items tagged with HDCP

Taiwan-based electronics manufacturer, Grandtec, claims that it is now shipping "the world's first USB to HDMI converter"--the Grand HD Cinema. Grandtec claims that the Grand HD Cinema can use your Windows XP or Vista system's USB 2.0 ports to send 720p HD video to an HDMI-equipped display, such as widescreen HD LCD or plasma TV. The Grand HD Cinema is a 1.30x2.17x3.94-inch (HWD) adapter with a USB port on one end and an HDMI port on the other. It gets its power from the USB port, so it doesn't need an external power supply. You can connect up to six Grand HD Cinema adapters to a PC to send video... Read more...
HKEPC reports that Intel's upcoming G35 (Bearlake G+) IGP chipset will have complete support for both HDMI connections and HDCP. With Vista and high-definition formats such as HD-DVD and Blu-Ray promising to utilize HDCP, the inclusion of this technology is surely a necessity for Intel should they wish to hang onto the market share they currently have. Thankfully, the HDMI connection will also simplify things for users as the single cable can handle both audio and video duties. Unfortunately, the HDMI spec calls for 3.3V instead of the 1.2V which the motherboard can... Read more...
DailyTech brings word that ATI has responded to the latest complaints regarding the company's supposed support for HDCP functionality with its products. HDCP content protection is said to be fully supported by ATI's latest GPU's. However, products using these GPU's lack the appropriate decryption keys at the board level to actually allow for this functionality. If you purchased an ATI-based graphics card in preparation for Vista, be warned that the HDCP feature you'll require might not actually be enabled and yet another graphics card will need to be purchased to play withthe full functionality... Read more...
Some interesting reading over at FiringSquad today regarding HDCP and the current level of support for the technology offered by ATI and NVIDIA.  HDCP support has been listed in both company's GPU specification for years, but did you know there is virtually no board level support for HDCP at this time?"HDCP stands for High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection and is an Intel-initiated program that was developed with Silicon Image. This content protection system is mandatory for high-definition playback of HD-DVD or Blu-Ray discs. If you want to watch movies at 1980x1080, your system will need... Read more...