Items tagged with HD 5000

AMD has yet to make an official statement on this topic, but several unofficial remarks and leaks point in the same direction.  Contrary to rumor, there won't be a new GCN 2.0 GPU out this spring to head up the Radeon HD 8000 family. This breaks with a pattern AMD has followed for nearly six years. Starting with the HD 3000 family, which debuted in November 2007, each successive generation appeared 9-13 months later. The HD 4000 series debuted in June 2008, the HD 5000 products launched in September 2009, the HD 6000's in October 2010, and the HD 7000 family in January, 2011. By that calendar,... Read more...
The Internet has been buzzing with unoficial information regarding the specs and performance of AMD's upcoming Radeon 6000 cards, but we may have to wait a little longer According to the ever reliable rumor bill, AMD has pushed to launch back a month or so. There's been no mention of why Sunnyvale would delay the launch, particularly given the way NVIDIA's GTS 460 and GTS 450 are hammering the price/performance ratio of the Radeon 5500 and 5700 cards. We're going to guess that AMD has delayed its launch for one of two reasons:  Last year, AMD's ability to sell Radeon 5000 cards was heavily... Read more...
If you've read our review of NVIDIA's new GTS 450 and are hungry for additional information, we've rounded up some of the other coverage online for your perusing pleasure. Tech Report has information on stock and overclocked cards with SLI tossed in, as do our lovable, polite Canadian brothers. Hexus.net has its own review on some single card matchups, Over at Legit Reviews, Nathan Kirsch goes into some detail on NVIDIA's target market for the GTS 450, and tests a few games other sites didn't. If you're curious about numbers for Batman: Arkham Asylum, Stalker: Call of Pripyat, or FurMark 1.8.2,... Read more...
One of the annoying realities of buying aftermarket coolers for CPUs or video cards is that the heatsink component of the cooler can end up with a relatively short lifespan, particularly if you prefer to upgrade at a fairly quick pace. This is arguably more of an issue for GPUs than CPUs, and the cost of keeping one's system temperatures and/or acoustics at the desired level can easily tack an extra $100-$200 on to periodic update costs. CoolIT Systems claims to have designed its way around the need for such replacements through the use of what it calls a universal cooling plate. We reviewed a... Read more...