Items tagged with data caps

Comcast has sparked the ire of customers across the country with its restrictive broadband data caps. Earlier this week, we reported that during the first half of 2015, Comcast received 863 complaints about its data caps. However, for the second half of the year, those complaints skyrocketed to nearly 8,000 as it expanded its data cap “trials” to additional markets. And it’s not just customers that are fed up with data caps; the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has also let it be known that it won’t tolerate such nonsense. In fact, the FCC stipulated that in order for Charter to win approval... Read more...
Cable ISP customers aren't real keen on Comcast's broadband data caps and they're letting the Federal Communications Commission know about it in rising numbers. In the second half of 2015, there were 7,904 complaints about data caps, up from 863 complaints in the first half of the year. As of April in this year, the total was 1,463. Comcast, one of just two outfits to earn Consumerist's "Worst Company in America" title on more than one occasion (2010 and 2014), knows it needs to do a better job satisfying customers. That's why the ISP went on a hiring spree in March of last year, at the time noting... Read more...
While it might have been difficult to imagine 15 years ago, so much of our daily lives are now dependent on the Internet. This has led to a surge in data hogging products and services, like high-definition and even 4K video streams, massive game downloads, and so forth. Data caps are inherently at odds with this transition from offline to online experiences, and if you're an AT&T U-verse subscriber, you'll soon have the option of removing yours, for a fee.Beginning May 23rd, AT&T will roll out a new unlimited data option for its U-verse home Internet customers. For an extra $30 per month,... Read more...
It probably won't come as much surprise that Comcast and its customers aren't on the same page when it comes to data caps. Simply put, Comcast is in favor of charging extra when a customer goes over a set amount of data per month, while customers despise them and have filed over 13,000 related complaints with the Federal Communications Commission. Here's the thing, Comcast CEO Brian Roberts doesn't like the term "data cap" because hey, if you're a Comcast customer and you reach your monthly data allotment, the ISP will happily charge you a fee for more data. In other words, there's no off switch... Read more...
Comcast CEO Brian Roberts is making good on the company’s ‘Comcast Cares’ policy. For many, however, it appears that Comcast Cares more about its bottom line than about its customers. Roberts made that clear at Business Insider’s Ignition conference after he was asked point blank by the publication’s EIC, Henry Blodget, to respond to customer complaints about data caps. Roberts first tried to dance around the use of the term data caps, stating, “But they’re not a cap. We don’t want anybody to ever not want to stay connected on our network.” In other words, since Comcast doesn’t simply turn of the... Read more...
Over the past week, we’ve detailed Comcast’s continued efforts to spread data caps to more of its markets in the United States. Starting December 1st, nine additional markets in the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee and Virginia, will be hit with 300GB monthly data caps. But of course, these same customers have the option of opting for unlimited data, but they will have to pay an additional $35 per month. The assumption was that Comcast was making this move because of “data hogs” that were slowing the network down for others — you know, “The needs of the man outweigh the needs of the few.”... Read more...
We don’t usually associate Comcast with the word fair, but that’s exactly the term the telecommunications company is using to describe its new plan to expand its restrictive data caps to additional markets across the United States. According to a new report, which has been confirmed by Comcast, customers in nine additional cities will now be subject to 300GB monthly data caps. For these customers, the all-you-can eat data buffet is effectively going away — that is unless you’re willing to pay Comcast even more money. Comcast says that its new 300GB plans will go into effect starting December 1st,... Read more...
Data caps are the bane of any active broadband Internet subscriber, and let's face it, the arbitrary limitation is mostly hogwash. You know it, we know it, and heck, even Comcast knows it. But if that's the case, then why does Comcast impose a 300GB per month data cap on its Internet service? That's a good question -- so good that it stumped one of Comcast's higher ups.Jason Livingood is the Vice President of Internet Service for Comcast. He's also a Twitter user, and when asked on the microblogging service about the data caps, Livingood gave a refreshingly honest answer, one that strongly suggests... Read more...
Recently, Sprint went on the offensive with its data plan by offering families 1GB of shared data for $20 per month and introducing a double data plan that offers 20GB for $100. In response, Verizon and AT&T have fired back with their own updated data plans to entice consumers over to their services. On Friday, Verizon announced a price reduction for its $100  and $110 per month plans. Effective November 1, new and existing customers who go with the company’s new "More Everything" plan will receive 10GB for $80 and 15GB for $100. In addition, Verizon is also offering a $150 port-in credit... Read more...
Last month, we covered AT&T's decision to impose caps on its previous unlimited Internet service plans. An estimated 56 percent of Americans now pay for bandwidth-capped service, almost always at the same price point that once allowed them unlimited bandwidth. Now, toss in the fact that you can't swing a dead cat two feet without smacking into another company eagerly talking about 'cloud services.' The offers are varied, the promises inflated, and the terminology uncertain. In virtually every case, today's cloud services are nothing more than what we used to call 'web storage' or 'sharing content... Read more...