Items tagged with cores

Over the past seven months or so, NVIDIA has revealed a number of details regarding its upcoming mobile wonder-chip, codenamed Kal-El. According to information provided by NVIDIA dating all the way back to February, Kal-El was to be the world’s first mobile quad-core SoC, sporting an integrated 12-core GeForce GPU, with support for resolutions up to 2560x1600, and performance that’s roughly 5x that of the current Tegra 2. News out of NVIDIA today, however, reveals that Kal-El actually has 5 CPU cores, four high-performance cores for general processing duties a low-power “companion”... Read more...
Earlier today in a San Francisco press briefing Intel Chief Technology Officer, Justin Rattner took the wraps off a proof of concept and experimental product that Intel dubbed a "Single-Chip Cloud Computer". The objective this chip was designed to address is the huge opportunity that exists to reduce power consumption and space in the data center, a very real place, rather than mythical, where "the cloud" really exists and increasing user demand for online services continues to chew up bandwidth, processing resources and storage like there is no tomorrow. The Intel Single-chip Cloud Computer or... Read more...
New AMD Athlon II X2 245 and 240 Processors Designed to Efficiently Handle Today’s Mainstream Computing Needs-- Dual-core processors deliver the right mix of power efficiency and performance at very affordable price points -- What: AMD (NYSE:AMD) today announced the AMD Athlon II X2 dual-core 245 and 240 processors, delivering 45nm technology-based performance to mainstream PC users for less than $67 USD. When combined with AMD’s chipsets, these processors are designed to provide plenty of performance to handle today’s popular mainstream applications in multitasking environments – all while remaining... Read more...
Though obviously Microsoft has taken a fair amount of heat regarding Windows Vista, there's probably a directly proportional level of hype on their next mainstream OS, Windows 7.  Projected by some to be the OS that Vista should have been, and still by others to be nothing more than Vista on steroids (perhaps just a six-pack of Red Bull, depending on who you talk to); there's plenty of rumor, gossip, leaked and public information to go around to keep your mind off your troubled Vista installation that just crashed again for the eleventh time today.  However, when it comes to unreleased... Read more...
When microprocessor manufacturers ran into increasing complications as they tried to make chips runs faster, they shifted gears, and started building more powerful processors using multiple cores. We're still at the early part of the multi-core revolution, but researchers at the University of Rochester claim that microprocessor manufacturers will eventually run into similar challenges with today's multi-core processor design because of the "limits of miniaturization." So what comes next? The answer still lies with multi-core processors; but instead of just packing cores in next to each other on... Read more...
Apparently Intel hasn't forgotten those of you on a budget or in need of a low-power solution for Home Theater setup and the like.  Word is Intel is gearing up to release the Celeron E1200 in January, a 65W chip with dual cores at 1.6GHz, 512KB of cache and an 800MHz FSB.  Word is three mid-range 45nm quad-core (Yorkfield) chips are due out the same day as well, with  Q9300, Q9450 and Q9550 are on the horizon, set to launch on January 20th. "The first dual-core Celeron processor, the E1200, will have core frequency of 1.6GHz, 800MHz FSB and 512KB L2 cache with a price... Read more...
Intel is planning on improving the performance per core on future Itaniums, which should be evident in the next generation part codenamed Tukwila.  While we're all for making sure each core runs efficiently, it seems a bit strange that this would be a major concern for Itanium R&D people like Cameron McNair.  Most people would probably associate Itanium with server clusters and either highly scalable software or large user environments that require lots of resources.Apparently McNair says that there are other processing needs of Itanium customers a well:"There are some workloads that... Read more...
Piling on the cores is nothing new. Intel demonstrated an 80 core processor last year. But there's always been a problem. The computing power of multiple cores has been like a huge boat you built in your basement. You could go sailing, but it won't fit out the door. In multicore chips, the too-small door is getting on or off-chip access to memory through which all data must pass. Well, MIT spinoff Tilera is expected to present a 64 core processor at Stanford's "Hot Chips" symposium today, and instead of a skyscraper of cores stacked on top of a tiny lobby, it's laid out like a grid of city streets.... Read more...
Intel recently announced its intentions to develop a CPU containing 80 cores, but Mike Magee over at The Inquirer explains why he thinks more cores may not be better. The main point of his argument is that hardware can only truly be effective if software can take advantage of it's full capabilities. With that said, what good is an 80 core CPU without software that can utilize that much processing power? Only time will tell whether software will be developed to take advantage of Intel's proposed 80 core CPUs. Perhaps CPUs with as many as 80 cores really are the future... Read more...
Intel has pledged to have a CPU with 80 cores on it within 5 years and has a prototype to prove it.  Intel showed off the CPU wafer at IDF which contains 80 teraflop chips which reportedly can process 1 trillion floating point operations per second.  Now Moore's Law states that the number of transistors that can fit on a single IC will double every 18 months.  This kind of a claim from Intel would most certainly test the boundaries and limits of that theory. CEO Paul Otellini held up a silicon wafer with the prototype chips before several thousand attendees at the Intel... Read more...
The folks over at X-Bit labs take their time demystifying the inner workings of dual-core architecture in their latest article. Using some clever benchmarking techniques, they aim to compare data transfer rates between AMD and Intel's dual core CPUs. "The processors are working with data that are read from system memory to be modified and then written back. Data are cached in the CPU for faster processing, but more than one processor may request the same data in a multiprocessor system. This is not a problem if both the processors are just reading data, because they are both provided the most... Read more...